Rob Dauster

LAWRENCE, KS - JANUARY 21: Frank Mason III #0 of the Kansas Jayhawks drives to the goal against Andrew Jones #1 of the Texas Longhorns in the first half at Allen Field House on January 21, 2017 in Lawrence, Kansas. (Photo by Ed Zurga/Getty Images)
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No. 2 Kansas’ backcourt shines in 79-67 win over Texas

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LAWRENCE, Kan. (AP) Shaquille Cleare turned the ball over on Texas’ first two possessions. Not even 40 seconds had expired before Kansas’ Devonte’ Graham drained a 3-pointer in transition.

Thirty seconds later, Frank Mason III pulled up for a shot outside the arc to put Kansas up 6-0.

“I think that’s the best we started a game in the past few games that we’ve played in,” Mason said. “We have to do that every game moving forward.”

Graham scored 18 points, Mason added 17 and No. 2 Kansas beat Texas 79-67 on Saturday.

Freshman Josh Jackson chipped in 15 points for the Jayhawks while Svi Mykhailiuk added 12 points and Landen Lucas had 12 rebounds.

Kansas (18-1, 7-0 Big 12) hovered between a six- and eight-point lead for most of the second half. The Jayhawks only pulled away with 60 seconds remaining, as Graham and Mykhailiuk hit corner 3-pointers in front of the Kansas bench.

“We were so good early, you’re not going to keep playing that way,” Kansas coach Bill Self said. “Texas, we kind of staggered them early and then the law of averages prevailed. They fought back. I don’t think you should apologize for playing somebody even.”

Texas (7-12, 1-6) opened the game with five turnovers in the first 4 minutes, letting the Jayhawks run out to a quick 10-point lead. Texas managed to cut the deficit to three points with 6 1/2 minutes remaining in the first half, but that was as close as the Longhorns would get.

Freshman Jarrett Allen posted season-highs with 22 points and 19 rebounds for Texas. Eric Davis Jr. added 12 points and Cleare scored 11.

BIG PICTURE

The next three games for Kansas are going to be the biggest test the Jayhawks have had all season. In a span of nine days, the Jayhawks will play three top seven teams. Two of those games take place in hostile road environments.

Kansas goes to No. 7 West Virginia on Tuesday and remains on the road to play at No. 5 Kentucky on the following Saturday. Kansas returns home that following Wednesday to host No. 6 Baylor.

The big win over the Longhorns should give the Jayhawks confidence heading into their tough test, but the big question is: Will Kansas have enough energy to get through it?

“This is a stretch that is probably as tough as we’ve had since I’ve been here,” Self said.

POLL IMPLICATIONS

Villanova leapfrogged Kansas for the No. 1 spot on Monday. With the Wildcats’ definitive 30- and 10-point wins over Seton Hall and Providence this week, expect the top two spots to remain the same.

QUOTABLE

“It’s kind of like the `Twilight Zone’ because it feels like there’s nothing else going on here besides the game,” Texas coach Shaka Smart said of Lawrence and the University of Kansas. “Everybody’s locked in on the game. That’s a testament to the program and Coach Self and what they’ve built over the years.”

GOIN’ STREAKING

The win over Texas gave Kansas its 50th straight win in Allen Fieldhouse and its 36th straight at home in conference play.

UP NEXT

Texas returns home to host Oklahoma on Monday.

Kansas hits the road to start its gauntlet, playing at West Virginia on Tuesday.

More AP college basketball: http://www.collegebasketball.ap.org and https://twitter.com/AP-Top25.

Happ, No. 17 Wisconsin edge Minnesota in overtime, 78-76

MINNEAPOLIS, MN - JANUARY 21: Reggie Lynch #22 of the Minnesota Golden Gophers fouls Ethan Happ #22 of the Wisconsin Badgers while shooting the ball during the second half of the game on January 21, 2017 at Williams Arena in Minneapolis, Minnesota. (Photo by Hannah Foslien/Getty Images)
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MINNEAPOLIS — Ethan Happ scored a career-high 28 points and grabbed 12 rebounds to lead No. 17 Wisconsin to a 78-76 overtime victory over Minnesota on Saturday.

Nigel Hayes added 21 points for the Badgers (16-3, 5-1 Big Ten) and Bronson Koenig hit two huge 3-pointers in overtime to help beat the Golden Gophers for the sixth straight time. The bigger, stronger Badgers outscored Minnesota 44-24 in the paint to win for the 12th time in their last 13 games.

Amir Coffey scored 19 points and Akeem Springs added 16 for the Gophers (15-5, 3-4), who lost their third straight game. Springs hit a 3 to force overtime, but his last-second heave in overtime clanked off the rim to preserve the victory for Wisconsin.

The border rivalry had not been much of a rivalry lately, with the Badgers taking every game following an upset by the Gophers in 2014. That game, a win over No. 9 Wisconsin, was the last time Williams Arena was sold out for a game before Saturday. And this crowd got its money’s worth.

There was plenty of red in the upper deck at the Barn, but the old gym’s rafters rattled for the first time in recent memory thanks to a Gophers program that has awakened this season after winning just eight games last season. With the homegrown Coffey leading the way, Minnesota took a 48-45 lead with 12 minutes to play in the game.

Reggie Lynch scored on a putback to put Minnesota up 64-62, but the Gophers went more than 5 minutes without scoring against the Big Ten’s best defense. Springs got loose for an off-the-dribble 3 from the left wing that tied the game with 11.4 seconds to go.

Koenig’s second 3 of OT put Wisconsin up 77-76 with 44 seconds to play. He finished with 11 points.

BIG PICTURE

Wisconsin: Another tough win on the road against an opponent with a strong RPI has the Badgers rolling. They are in first place in the conference and withstood a fiery effort from the Gophers that should move them up the Associated Press’ Top 25. Wisconsin has road wins over Minnesota, Indiana and Marquette to bolster its resume.

Minnesota: Win or lose, this was a big game for establishing Williams Arena as a place to be in the crowded Twin Cities sports market again. The Gophers were knocked out of the AP Top 25 last week with consecutive losses to Michigan State and Penn State, but the young team gave senior-laden Wisconsin all it could handle. The gritty performance should further show a skeptical public that the team is worthy of its attention once more.

HAPP’S BINGE

The Wisconsin big man got off to a slow start in the game, missing several easy shots early. But the Badgers never would have made it to OT without his performance in the second half. He scored 14 straight for the Badgers at one point and almost single-handedly fouled Lynch out of the game.

UP NEXT

Wisconsin: Hosts Penn State on Tuesday.

Minnesota: Visits Ohio State on Wednesday.

POSTERIZED: Derek Willis stuns Kentucky bench with dunk

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Derek Willis stunned his teammates with a poster over South Carolina’s Sedee Keita on Saturday.

I’m sure you’ll be able to read his lips here …

Yeah, this was pretty nice:

No. 14 Arizona lands first marquee win, upsetting No. 3 UCLA in Pauley

LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 21: Allonzo Trier #35 of the Arizona Wildcats goes up for a layup against TJ Leaf #22 of the UCLA Bruins during the first half of the game at Pauley Pavilion on January 21, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)
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Allonzo Trier made his first appearance of the season for No. 14 Arizona but it was Kobi Simmons who was the star for the Wildcats as Sean Miller’s club picked up their biggest win of the season, going into Pauley Pavilion and knocking off No. 3 UCLA, 96-85.

Simmons had 18 points, five boards and five assists, providing the spark at the end of the first half as Arizona opened up a 48-37 lead. Lauri Markkanen, who has been Arizona’s best player on the season, finished with 18 points while Trier chipped in with 10 points, seven boards and four assists.

The win moves Arizona into sole possession of first place in the Pac-12 – at least until No. 11 Oregon plays at USC tonight – at 7-0, a full two games ahead of the Bruins in the loss column. Arizona still gets UCLA in the McKale Center, but their only game against Oregon will come in Eugene.

For the Bruins, Lonzo Ball led the way with 24 points, eight assists and six boards, but he had very little impact on the game in the final 12 minutes. The bigger talking point for UCLA is their defense. They entered Saturday ranked 92nd in the country in defensive efficiency, according to KenPom, and giving up 96 points to the Wildcats isn’t going to help that. Arizona was able to penetrate at will on Saturday, and it’s a concern for the Bruins that is glaring.

Here are the four things to take away from that game:

1. Allonzo Trier is back, but this was more than just his return: Getting Trier back into the fold was, unquestionably, a boost for the Wildcats. He finished with 12 points, seven boards and four assists and, for the most part, held his own on the defensive end of the floor. He had a bucket near the end of the first half that pushed Arizona’s lead to 11 points, and when UCLA made a run in the second half, he had a steal and a dunk that felt like a momentum-changing play.

Arizona is a better team with him on the floor.

But this score, this result, was about much more than just the return of a guy that sat out the first 19 games of the season. For starters, Kobi Simmons played the best game that he’s played since he arrived in Tucson. He has lottery-level talent, and while his inconsistency and tendency to coast is the knock on him, when Simmons is locked in, he can do what he did on Saturday. It was about Markkanen, who outplayed T.J. Leaf, the guy that he essentially replaced in Arizona’s recruiting class. It was about the leadership down the stretch of Kadeem Allen and the key stops that Arizona got down the stretch.

In other words, simply saying that Arizona looked like a Final Four contender because Trier was back is a disservice to that performance.

2. This win provided the validation that we needed to take Arizona seriously: Arizona entered Saturday with a gaudy, 17-2 record, but it was hard to take them seriously as a Pac-12 or Final Four contender because of the teams that they had beaten to get to this point. Prior to winning at Pauley Pavilion, the best win Arizona had on the year was a Michigan State team that just got smoked by the O.G. Anunoby-less Indiana Hoosiers or at USC, who was without Bennie Boatwright.

A competitive performance, let alone a win, would’ve been enough to convince us that their record wasn’t a fluke. A win, however, is precisely what Arizona needed to bolster a tournament rĂ©sumĂ© that still lacks a bit of depth.

3. UCLA’s defense is becoming a major concern: We knew UCLA wasn’t all that good on the defensive side of the ball entering Saturday. They ranked 92nd in KenPom’s adjusted defensive efficiency metric, which isn’t good but which was the kind of thing that could be overlooked given just how dominant UCLA’s offense can be. They had developed a habit of getting up by 25 points and then slacking off on the defensive end, which isn’t ideal but whatever. They were still winning.

Saturday, however, was a disaster. Arizona scored 1.315 points-per-possession, which is downright unacceptable for a team with their sights set on the Final Four and a potential national title. The Wildcats seemed to target Bryce Alford, whose defensive issues are well-known, and routinely attacked him with dribble penetration. But Bryce wasn’t the only victim here. No one on UCLA’s perimeter seemed capable of being the stopper, and the result was that the Wildcats were able to get to the bucket at will.

4. Can UCLA still win the Pac-12?: After losing on Saturday, the Bruins are now two games behind both Oregon and Arizona in the Pac-12 standings, and they still have a trip to the McKale Center left on their schedule. The Bruins have been the trendy pick to win the national title for a while because of how quickly they can score and how entertaining they are to watch, but at this point it seems unlikely that they’ll be able to make up two games in the standings on two different teams with just 11 games remaining on the schedule.

Does that say more about the Bruins as national title contenders or just how good the Pac-12 is at the top of the conference? I’d lean the latter, but after seeing the way UCLA defended on Saturday, I’m not sure.

No. 7 Creighton loses at home in first game without Mo Watson

OMAHA, NE - JANUARY 21: Marcus Foster #0 of the Creighton Bluejays shoots the ball between Matt Heldt #12 and Duane Wilson #1 of the Marquette Golden Eagles during their game at CenturyLink Center on January 21, 2017 in Omaha, Nebraska. (Photo by Eric Francis/Getty Images)
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Playing their first game without Mo Watson, No. 7 Creighton dug themselves an early hole and could never climb out, losing at home to Marquette, 102-94.

On the surface, it’s pretty clear what happened here, right? The Bluejays lost their all-american point guard, the guy that set the tone for their high-octane offense, and the result was a mollywhopping in front of their home fans.

And their may be something to that. It took Creighton a while to find their footing offensively – they missed 23 of their first 34 shots from the floor – and that’s before you consider the mental side of losing the leader of your team.

But Creighton’s issue on Saturday wasn’t on the offensive side of the ball. They put up 94 points. They shot 49.3 percent from the floor and 11-for-24 from three. They only committed 11 turnovers. Isaiah Zierdan, who started in Watson’s place, finished with 15 points and hit all four of his threes. Davion Mintz, who played the majority of the minutes at the point guard spot, had 17 points and eight assists while turning the ball over just two times. Marcus Foster looked like the Marcus Foster that was first-team all-Big 12 as a freshman, finishing with 30 points.

Their transition game wasn’t quite as lethal as with Watson, but overall, Creighton scored enough to win.

Their may have been some mitigating factors there – and I’ll get to those in a second – but on paper, the defensive side of the ball was far more concerning. Simply put, you aren’t going to win many games when you give up 1.275 points-per-possession or allow an opponent to shoot 60 percent from the floor.

Now maybe there was a reason that Creighton struggled so much early in the game. Maybe there numbers are somewhat inflated by the fact that Marquette was trying not to foul down the stretch. Maybe Creighton’s effectiveness offensively had just as much to do with them as it did with a Marquette team that entered Saturday ranked 143rd in KenPom’s defensive efficiency metric.

Calling a home loss to a likely NIT team promising is silly.

But there is reason to be optimistic if you are a Creighton fan.

They got lit up by a team with one of the nation’s most efficient offenses. It happens. But if they can keep scoring at this clip, maybe their ceiling didn’t fall quite as far as we thought it would in a post-Mo Watson world.

VIDEO: Clock stoppage costs Georgia win at Texas A&M

NASHVILLE, TN - MARCH 11:  Mark Fox the head coach of the Georgia Bulldogs gives instructions to his team during the game against the South Carolina Gamecocks during the quarterfinals of the SEC Basketball Tournament at Bridgestone Arena on March 11, 2016 in Nashville, Tennessee.  (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)
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COLLEGE STATION, Texas — Texas A&M wiped out a 13-point second-half deficit to defeat Georgia 63-62 on Saturday in one of the season’s odder endings.

The Bulldogs had the final possession trailing by one, but the clock inadvertently stopped with 5.6 seconds remaining. Georgia’s J.J. Frazier dribbled the ball near the top of the key, and thought he had time to pass down low to Yante Maten.

Maten received the pass from Frazier, and officials whistled a foul on the Aggies when Maten attempted a layup. With the clock still stuck at 5.6 seconds, officials used game video to count down Georgia’s final possession, and determined that time had run out before the foul was called on A&M.

Here is the play:

Georgia coach Mark Fox kept his composure afterward but was obviously upset at the outcome.

“Our kid (Frazier) looks up and thinks he has time to make a play, but he doesn’t,” Fox said. “I don’t know who stopped the clock; I’d like to know.”

Afterward A&M officials said a “belt-pack” worn by one of the officials malfunctioned and inadvertently stopped the clock. They were checking further into what happened. The Aggies (10-8, 2-5 Southeastern) snapped a two-game losing streak, while the Bulldogs (12-7, 4-3) have lost two of their last three.

Robert Williams led the Aggies with 18 points and D.J. Hogg followed with 16, while Maten led the Bulldogs with a game-high 19 points.