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The Reinvention Of Greg McDermott: How Creighton’s coach remade his coaching philosophy

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Sometimes, what you’re looking for comes to you when you’re not looking for it.

Sometimes, the changes you need to make become apparent before you know changes need to be made.

For Greg McDermott, it happened during his first season as the head coach at Creighton, as he was leading an unremarkable Bluejay team on a run to within a game of the 2011 CBI title, an event only “memorable” because former Creighton coach Dana Altman, then in his first season with Oregon, squared off with his old team for a three-game series in the finals.

No one has ever dreamed of playing in the CBI. McDermott was coaching a roster full of veterans that he did not recruit to play in a tournament that they never wanted to be a part of. Keeping seniors engaged when they are going to end their career in an event far less prestigious than even the NIT is a tough sell, but doing so when there is a 10-day layoff between being eliminated from the conference tournament and playing the first game of the CBI is like trying to motivate a locker room full of seven-year olds to lineup and wait to get flu shots.

McDermott had a plan, one he thought could help.

Old Guys vs. Young Guys.

There were a handful of promising freshman on the roster, including McDermott’s son, Doug. Grant Gibbs, a transfer from Gonzaga, was sitting out as a redshirt, as was Ethan Wragge, who dealt with an injury that season. They were on the scout team most of the year, meaning they never got reps alongside that year’s starters in practice. This was a chance to make that happened, and there isn’t a coach in the country that wouldn’t love to get those extra practices in after the season; it’s like getting the Cliffs Notes for next season’s team.

This time, however, there was a catch.

“He just said play,” said Gibbs, which is a departure from the norm for a guy who had spent the past decade coaching like he learned the game from Tony Bennett. “Run it up the floor, set early ball-screens, space the court and let it fly.”

McDermott’s never gone back.



“No.”

Ben Jacobson’s answer is nothing if not to the point when asked if he ever thought that he would see the day where Greg McDermott would be running a spread pick-and-roll system on a team that ranks top 25 nationally in pace, in the process eschewing the set plays with actions and counters on top of counters that made him so successful at Northern Iowa.

“I would not have, and I know for sure I would not have been alone.”

Jake, as he’s known in the coaching world, knows Mac and the way that he was raised in this business better than anyone. McDermott’s first season as an assistant coach came at North Dakota the same year that Jacobson was a freshman in Rich Glass’ program. He played for McDermott for four years. They spent a year on staff at UND together and, six years later, joined forces against as McDermott took head coaching positions at North Dakota State and, in 2001, Northern Iowa.

Jacobson worked for McDermott for five years in Cedar Falls. He took over for him when McDermott was hired by Iowa State. He still hasn’t left, and he’s still running those same sets, same actions and same counters – still playing that Pack-Line defense – that McDermott did.

“What I think is a great thing about college basketball and basketball in general is that there are so many different ways to be successful,” McDermott said. “Ben Jacobson is one of the best college basketball coaches in the country, but he does it totally different than I do. It works for him and his program and what they do.”

And it worked for McDermott while he was there as well. He reached the NCAA tournament in his last three seasons with the program, and that included earning an at-large bid out of the Missouri Valley for the last two. They’ve reached the NCAA tournament four more times since McDermott left, including two of the last three years. As it stands, UNI is arguably the best basketball program left in the Valley, and their current success makes it easy to forget what they were when McDermott took the reins.

Ben Jacobson (Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)

Sam Weaver amassed a 30-57 record during his three-year tenure with UNI. He went 7-24 the year before McDermott arrived, and prior to the trip to the 2004 NCAA tournament, the program had been to just a single NCAA tournament as a member of Division I.

“When we got here, I remember going over to some workouts in the spring and just seeing the guys a little bit,” Jacobson said. “And it didn’t feel like the guys I just worked out would have played for us on [my North Dakota State and North Dakota teams] that were Division II.”

“I’m 100 percent convinced he’s the only guy that could have come in here and get it turned around that fast while putting in a foundation for us to be able to continue to have success.”

Why?

It’s simple, really.

McDermott had the connections. He played there. He knew who he needed to get support from on campus. He knew where to go and what to do to get support for the program from people in the community, whether it be financial or something as simple and necessary as butts in seats. More importantly, he had relationships with high school coaches in the state of Iowa. He was able to get players that had the ability to end up somewhere better, and he was able to do that before the program was good. It’s one thing for Northern Iowa to land a high-major recruit these days. It was a different story in 2002, when the program was in the midst of their sixth-straight losing season.

And with the players that McDermott was bringing into the program, it only made sense to play the way that he had spent the majority of his life playing and coaching.

“We weren’t the most talented team,” McDermott said. “We didn’t want more possessions, we wanted less possessions.”

He had a roster full of players that grew up playing that exact same upper-midwest brand of basketball. Flare screens, back screens, slips. His emphasis on tough defense, execution on offense and spacing was no different than that of the high school and AAU programs he was recruiting players from. That style of play led to a 3-2 record against Iowa in those five years, including a win over the Hawkeyes in his first year, when Iowa was the No. 12 team in the country with Luke Recker and Reggie Evans on the roster. He won at Iowa State. He won at LSU the year LSU got to the Final Four.

It worked.

But basketball has changed since those days.

And McDermott had to change, too.


Greg McDermott with Northern Iowa (Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

In what turned out to be a fortuitous bit of scheduling luck, Creighton drew Davidson in the second round of the CBI back in 2011.

After dispatching San Jose State in the opener, McDermott and his staff had six days to pour over tape of Bob McKillop’s team doing what they do. There aren’t many in the collegiate ranks that embrace pace and space quite like Stephen Curry’s college coach does, and McDermott had all the time in the world to watch it on film. Combine that with what he was allowing his team to do in practice that spring and the fact that the Bluejays eventually beat Davidson 102-92 – the first time in McDermott’s Division I head coaching career that one of his teams cracked triple-digits – behind 31 points and 10 boards from his son, and McDermott saw the light.

It helped that his roster was perfect for that style of play.

There may never be another player better suited to being a small-ball four at the college level than Doug McDermott was. He is skilled enough to play shooting guard in the NBA and he was a killer in the post for Creighton throughout his career. He was also flanked by either Gregory Echinique – a bruising, 6-foot-10 Venezuelan center – or Ethan Wragge – a 6-foot-7 sniper that couldn’t do anything beyond shoot threes – in his Creighton days. Throw in a trio of guards that were able to space the floor with their shooting and operate in ball-screens, and it made too much sense not to run with a new style of play.

“The game has changed,” McDermott said. “At UNI, we might have defended ten ball-screens the entire game, but you’re going to defend a staggered double, you’re going to defend a double-screen, you’re going to defend America’s play, screen the screener, over and over again. It has changed. You may now defend those actions six to ten times per game and defend ball screens every possession.”

“You better change with the game.”

It worked in the Valley. Creighton would reach the NCAA tournament in each of the next two seasons as Doug developed into an All-American and the Bluejays became the target of Big East expansion. And it worked that first year in the Big East; building a system perfectly suited to maximize the talents of the best player in the sport is an easy way to win basketball, and McDermott did that.

The question was what would happen once the McBuckets era was over.

(Jim McIsaac/Getty Images)

McDermott’s tenure as the head coach at Iowa State was not great. He did not finish above .500 once in four seasons and only bested a 4-12 mark in Big 12 play in his first season – the Cyclones went 6-10 that year – despite the fact that he had four NBA players on his Iowa State rosters: Craig Brackins, Wes Johnson, Justin Hamilton and Diante Garrett.

In McDermott’s first post-Dougie McBuckets season, it looked like Creighton might be headed down that same path. The Bluejays went 14-19 and 4-14 in the Big East as their offense slowed back to a crawl, but McDermott had already started recruiting players to the system he wanted to play. It started with point guard Mo Watson, a dynamic and speedy point guard transfer from Boston U. that sat out the 2014-15 season, and Cole Huff, a transfer from Nevada that fit nicely as a stretch-four. Then McDermott landed commitments from a pair of high-major prospects from Omaha in Khyri Thomas and Justin Patton. Marcus Foster pledged to the Bluejays after a falling out with the Kansas State coaching staff.

He was landing talents that fit the way he wanted to play, and from there it’s only grown. Creighton beat out Kansas State for a commitment from now-starting point guard Davion Mintz, a North Carolina-native. They beat out the likes of Clemson and South Carolina to land Ty-Shon Alexander, a freshman guard that was ranked as a top 50 prospect. Alexander is another North Carolina-native. Perhaps most impressive was that McDermott secured the services of Mitchell Ballock, another top 50 prospect and a Kansas-native (and Jayhawk fan) that picked Creighton over, among others, Kansas.

In the process, the pace and space McDermott has played with has only gotten faster and bigger.

Creighton is 24th nationally in tempo this season, according to KenPom. They have been among the top 75 teams in pace the last three years. In his final season with Northern Iowa, McDermott ranked 321st in pace.

More importantly, they’re winning. In 2015-16, Creighton won 20 games and finished as a top 40 team on KenPom. Last year, had they not lost Watson early in Big East play, they would have finished the season as a top 10 team. This year, they’re a top 25 team with a roster that has plenty of young and intriguing talent on it.


Marcus Foster (Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)

Building UNI was one thing. McDermott is an alum. He was connected to the high school coaches in the state. He was able to get guys that could thrive in the Valley, and he won there by playing the style of basketball that defines where he’s from and where he was coaching. He was the perfect guy for the job, and it only made sense that he would make it work.

The same logic applied to Creighton when he took the job, which is why it made sense for him to leave Iowa State on his own volition to replace Altman in 2010. The school is located in Omaha, which sits on the Missouri River, the border between Nebraska and Iowa. You can see Iowa from the CenturyLink Center, where Creighton plays their home games. No one was surprised when he won there …

… when it was a member of the Missouri Valley.

What wasn’t so obvious was whether or not that success could be sustained once McDermott ran out of All-American offspring.

Well, it has, to the point that he was the object of Ohio State’s affection in June, when they were looking to find a replacement for Thad Matta.

He passed.

McDermott may have reinvented who he is as a basketball coach, but he’s still the same midwest country boy he was growing up in Cascade, Iowa.

“I’m 53 years old,” he said. “I really like my life. I like pulling into my driveway at night when I get home and I like pulling into work in the morning. I like the people I work with. There was really nothing missing in my life.”

“I’ve never made decisions in my life based on money. I’ve made moves because I thought it was a good move professionally or for our family, and had I chose to leave, it strictly would have been more dollars involved. I don’t think that’s the right reason to make a decision.”

“I’m happy.”

Commission on College Basketball says ban cheats, end 1-and-done

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INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The Commission on College Basketball sharply directed the NCAA to take control of the sport, calling for sweeping reforms to minimize one-and-done, permit players to return to school after going undrafted by the NBA and ban cheating coaches for life.

The independent commission, led by former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, released a detailed 60-page report Wednesday, seven months after the group was formed by the NCAA in response to a federal corruption investigation that rocked college basketball. Ten people, including some assistant coaches, have been charged in a bribery and kickback scheme , and high-profile programs such as Arizona, Louisville and Kansas have been tied to possible NCAA violations.

“The members of this commission come from a wide variety of backgrounds but the one thing that they share in common is that they believe the college basketball enterprise is worth saving,” Rice told the AP. “We believe there’s a lot of work to do in that regard. That the state of the game is not very strong.

“We had to be bold in our recommendations.”

The Associated Press obtained a copy of the report ahead of Rice presenting its findings to top NCAA officials. It’s not yet clear how the governing body would pay for some of the proposals, and some of the panel’s key recommendations would require cooperation from the NBA, its players union and USA Basketball.

The commission offered harsh assessments of toothless NCAA enforcement, as well as the shady summer basketball circuit that includes AAU leagues and brings together agents, apparel companies and coaches looking to profit on teenage prodigies. It called the environment surrounding college basketball “a toxic mix of perverse incentives to cheat,” and said responsibility for the current mess goes all the way up to university presidents.

The group recommended the NCAA have more involvement with players before they get to college and less involvement with enforcement. It also acknowledged the NCAA will need help to make some changes and defended its amateurism model, saying paying players a salary isn’t the answer.

“The goal should not be to turn college basketball into another professional league,” the commission wrote in its report.

Rice was scheduled to present the commission’s report to the NCAA’s Board of Governors and Division I Board of Directors on Wednesday morning. The two groups of university presidents planned to meet after Rice’s presentation to consider adopting the commission’s recommendations. If adopted, the hard work of turning the recommendations into NCAA legislation begins.

NCAA President Mark Emmert has said he wants reforms in place by August. The commission does, too. And it wants to review the NCAA’s plans for implementation before it goes before the boards for approval.

The 12-member commission made up of college administrators and former coaches and players was tasked with finding ways to reform five areas: NBA draft rules, including the league’s age limit that has led to so-called one-and-done players; the relationship between players and agents; non-scholastic basketball, such as AAU, meant to raise the profile of recruits; involvement of apparel companies with players, coaches and schools; and NCAA enforcement.

NCAA officials mostly stayed out of the process. Emmert and Georgia Tech President Bud Peterson were part of the commission, but not included in executive sessions, when proposals were being formed. The commission spent 70 percent of its time in executive session, Rice said, and kept its work secret until Wednesday’s reveal.

The overarching message to those in college athletics: Take responsibility for problems you have created.

ONE-AND-DONE

The commission emphasized the need for elite players to have more options when choosing between college and professional basketball, and to separate the two tracks.

The commission called for the NBA and its players association to change rules requiring players to be at least 19 years old and a year removed from graduating high school to be draft eligible. The rule was implemented in 2006, despite the success of straight-from-high-school stars such as LeBron James, Kobe Bryant and Kevin Garnett. The commission did, however, say if the NBA and NBPA refuse to change their rules in time for the next basketball season, it would reconvene and consider other options for the NCAA, such as making freshmen ineligible or locking a scholarship for three or four years if the recipient leaves a program after a single year.

“One-and-done has to go one way or another,” Rice told the AP, expressing hope the NBA would act.

The commission decided against attempting to mirror rules for baseball but said it could reconsider. Major League Baseball drafts players out of high school, but once an athlete goes to college he is not eligible to be drafted until after his third year. Baseball players can also return for their senior seasons after being drafted as long as they do not sign professional contracts.

The commission did take a piece of the baseball model and recommended basketball players be allowed to test the professional market in high school or after any college season, while still maintaining college eligibility. If undrafted, a college player would remain eligible as long as he requests an evaluation from the NBA and returns to the same school. Players could still leave college for professional careers after one year, but the rules would not compel them to do so.

ENFORCEMENT

The commission recommended harsher penalties for rule-breakers and that the NCAA outsource the investigation and adjudication of the most serious infractions cases. Level I violations would be punishable with up to a five-year postseason ban and the forfeiture of all postseason revenue for the time of the ban. That could be worth tens of millions to major conference schools. By comparison, recent Level I infractions cases involving Louisville and Syracuse basketball resulted in postseason bans of one year.

In those cases, then-Louisville coach Rick Pitino, who was later fired after being tied to the FBI investigation, received a five-game NCAA suspension for violations related to an assistant coach hiring strippers for recruits, and Syracuse coach Jim Boeheim was suspended for nine games for academic misconduct and extra benefits violations. The commission said suspensions should be longer, up to one full season.

Instead of show cause orders, which are meant to limit a coach’s ability to work in college sports after breaking NCAA rules, the report called for lifetime bans. The commission also said coaches and administrators should be contractually obligated comply with NCAA investigations.

AGENTS

The commission proposed the NCAA create a program for certifying agents, and make them accessible to players from high school through their college careers.

AAU AND SUMMER LEAGUES

The NCAA, with support from the NBA and USA Basketball, should run its own recruiting events for prospects during the summer, the commission said, and take a more serious approach to certifying events it does not control.

The NCAA should require greater transparency of the finances of what it called non-scholastic basketball events and ban its coaches from attending those that do not comply with more stringent vetting, the report said. Such a ban could wipe out AAU events that have flourished in showcasing future talent.

APPAREL COMPANIES

The commission also called for greater financial transparency from shoe and apparel companies such as Nike, Under Armour and Adidas. These companies have extensive financial relationships with colleges and coaches worth hundreds of millions of dollars, and Adidas had two former executives charged by federal prosecutors in New York in the corruption case.

The commission also called out university presidents, saying administrators can’t be allowed to turn a blind eye to infractions.

To that end, the commission said university presidents should be required to “certify annually that they have conducted due diligence and that their athletic programs comply with NCAA rules.”

The commission recommended the NCAA Board of Governors, currently comprised of 16 university presidents and chancellors, include five public members with full voting privileges who are not currently employed as university leaders.

Finally, the commission admonished those within college sports who use the NCAA as a scapegoat for the problems in basketball, saying universities and individuals are accountable for keeping the game clean.

“When those institutions and those responsible for leading them short-circuit rules, ethics and norms in order to achieve on-court success, they alone are responsible,” the commission wrote. “Too often, these individuals hide behind the NCAA when they are the ones most responsible for the degraded state of intercollegiate athletics, in general, and college basketball in particular.”

2018 NBA Draft Early Entry List: Who declared? Who is returning? Who are we waiting on?

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Here is a full list of the players that have signed with an agent, declared and are testing the waters and those that have decided to return to school.

Underclassmen have until April 22nd to declare for the NBA draft this season and until 11:59 p.m. on May 30th to remove their name from consideration.

The NBA Combine will be held May 16-20 this year. 

The full list of early entrants, from both the collegiate and international ranks, can be found here.

DECLARED, SIGNING WITH AGENT

TESTING THE WATERS

  • ESA AHMAD, West Virginia
  • MIKE AMIUS, Western Carolina
  • KOSTAS ANTETOKOUNMPO, Dayton
  • UDOKA AZUBUIKE, Kansas
  • SEDRICK BAREFIELD, Utah
  • TYUS BATTLE, Syracuse
  • LAMONTE BEARDEN, Western Kentucky
  • BRIAN BOWEN, Louisville
  • KY BOWMAN, Boston College
  • JORDAN BRANGERS, South Plains
  • BARRY BROWN, Kansas State
  • BRYCE BROWN, Auburn
  • TOOKIE BROWN, Georgia Southern
  • TROY BROWN, Oregon
  • C.J. BURKS, Marshall
  • JORDAN CAROLINE, Nevada
  • HAANIF CHEATEM, FGCU
  • KAMERON CHATMAN, Detroit
  • YOELI CHILDS, BYU
  • CHRIS CLEMONS, Campbell
  • TYLER COOK, Iowa
  • ISAAC COPELAND JR., Nebraska
  • BRYANT CRAWFORD, Wake Forest
  • MIKE DAUM, South Dakota State
  • JON DAVIS, Charlotte
  • JORDAN DAVIS, Northern Colorado
  • SHAWNTREZ DAVIS, Bethune Cookman
  • TERENCE DAVIS, Ole Miss
  • TYLER DAVIS, Texas A&M
  • NOAH DICKERSON, Washington
  • DONTE DIVINCENZO, Villanova
  • TORIN DORN, N.C. State
  • NOJEL EASTERN, Purdue
  • CARSEN EDWARDS, Purdue
  • JON ELMORE, Marshall
  • JACOB EVANS, Cincinnati
  • BRUNO FERNANDO, Maryland
  • JARREY FOSTER, SMU
  • MELVIN FRAZIER, Tulane
  • WENYEN GABRIEL, Kentucky
  • KAISER GATES, Xavier
  • EUGENE GERMAN, Northern Illinois
  • ADMON GILDER, Texas A&M
  • MICHAEL GILMORE, FGCU
  • JESSIE GOVAN, Georgetown
  • TYLER HALL, Montana State
  • JAYLEN HANDS, UCLA
  • ZACH HANKINS, Xavier
  • ETHAN HAPP, Wisconsin
  • JARED HARPER, Auburn
  • MALIK HINES, UMass
  • ARIC HOLMAN, Mississippi State
  • JALEN HUDSON, Florida
  • DEWAN HUELL, Miami
  • KEVIN HUERTER, Maryland
  • TRAMAINE ISABELL, Drexel
  • DEANGELO ISBY, Utah State
  • JUSTIN JAMES, Wyoming
  • ZACH JOHNSON, Miami
  • CHRISTIAN KEELING, Charleston Southern
  • DEVONTE KLINES, Montana State
  • SAGABA KONATE, West Virginia
  • KALOB LEDOUX, McNeese State
  • MARQUEZ LETCHER-ELLIS, RICE
  • ABDUL LEWIS, NJIT
  • MAKINDE LONDON, Chattanooga
  • DOMINIC MAGEE, Southern Miss
  • FLETCHER MAGEE, Wofford
  • CALEB MARTIN, Nevada
  • CODY MARTIN, Nevada
  • ZANE MARTIN, Towson
  • CHARLES MATTHEWS, Michigan
  • LUKE MAYE, North Carolina
  • JALEN MCDANIELS, San Diego State
  • MARKIS MCDUFFIE, Wichita State
  • CHRISTIAN MEKOWULU, Tennessee State
  • AARON MENZIES, Seattle
  • ELIJAH MINNIE, Eastern Michigan
  • SHELTON MITCHELL, Clemson
  • TAKAL MOLSON, Canisius
  • JUWAN MORGAN, Indiana
  • MATT MORGAN, Cornell
  • TRAVIS MUNNINGS, Louisiana-Monroe
  • RENATHAN ONA EMBO, Tulane
  • JOSH OKOGIE, Georgia Tech
  • JAMES PALMER JR., Nebraska
  • LAMAR PETERS, Mississippi State
  • JALON PIPKINS, CSUN
  • SHAMORIE PONDS, St. John’s
  • JONTAY PORTER, Missouri
  • MARCQUISE REED, Clemson
  • TRAYVON REED, Texas Southern
  • ISAIAH REESE, Canisius
  • CODY RILEY, UCLA
  • KERWIN ROACH II, Texas
  • JEROME ROBINSON, Boston College
  • AHMAAD RORIE, Montana
  • QUINTON ROSE, Temple
  • ADMIRAL SCHOFIELD, Tennessee
  • MICAH SEABORN, Monmouth
  • RONSHAD SHABAZZ, Appalachian State
  • TAVARIUS SHINE, Oklahoma State
  • CHRIS SILVA, South Carolina
  • YANKUBA SIMA, Oklahoma State
  • FRED SIMS, Chicago State
  • OMARI SPELLMAN, Villanova
  • MAX STRUS, DePaul
  • DESHON TAYLOR, Fresno State
  • KHYRI THOMAS, Creighton
  • REID TRAVIS, Stanford
  • JARRED VANDERBILT, Kentucky
  • LAGERALD VICK, Kansas
  • CHRISTIAN VITAL, Connecticut
  • JAYLIN WALKER, Kent State
  • NICK WARD, Michigan State
  • TREMONT WATERS, LSU
  • PJ WASHINGTON, Kentucky
  • QUINNDARY WEATHERSPOON, Mississippi State
  • ANDRIEN WHITE, Charlotte
  • DEMAJEO WIGGINS, Bowling Green
  • LINDELL WIGGINTON, Iowa State
  • AUSTIN WILEY, Auburn
  • KRIS WILKES, UCLA
  • JUSTIN WRIGHT-FOREMAN, Hofstra

RETURNING TO SCHOOL

 

Former Texas center James Banks III transfers to Georgia Tech

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After playing sparingly in two seasons at Texas, 6-foot-10 center James Banks III made the decision to transfer. Tuesday night Banks announced his next stop, with the Decatur, Georgia native committing to Georgia Tech.

After sitting out the 2018-19 season per NCAA transfer rules, Banks will have two seasons of eligibility remaining.

In 46 total games at Texas, Banks averaged 1.7 points, 2.3 rebounds and 1.1 blocks in 10.7 minutes per game. As a freshman Banks appeared in 32 games and averaged 12.4 minutes per appearance, contributing 1.7 points, 2.5 rebounds and 1.2 blocks per game. With the additions of Mohamed Bamba and Jericho Sims, Banks’ playing time decreased in 2017-18, as he appeared in 14 games and averaged 1.6 points and 1.7 rebounds in 6.8 minutes per game.

Georgia Tech currently has four scholarship front court players for the 2018-19 season, with one being rising redshirt senior forward Abdoulaye Gueye. Rising redshirt junior Sylvester Ogbonda and rising sophomores Evan Cole and Moses Wright will have eligibility remaining when Banks becomes available to compete at the start of the 2019-20 season.

Villanova basketball team snaps photo with Meek Mill prior to 76ers game

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Tuesday’s Game 5 between the Miami Heat and Philadelphia 76ers was a big one for both teams, as the visiting Heat were looking to stave off elimination and the 76ers were one win away from their first playoff series victory in six years.

What added to the atmosphere at Wells Fargo Center was the release of hip hop artist Meek Mill, who due to a Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruling was released from prison. Among those also in attendance were the reigning national champion Villanova Wildcats, who along with comedian Kevin Hart, Meek Mill and the artist’s lawyers took a photo prior to the game.

Villanova was originally scheduled to handle the pregame ringing of the replica Liberty Bell, but they were bumped due to Meek Mill’s release.

City prosecutors were of the belief that Meek Mill, who had been imprisoned without bail since November, was entitled to a new trial after being found guilty of a probation violation stemming from a conviction handed down in 2009. This was a factor in the Supreme Court’s decision to grant Meek Mill, who rang the bell prior to the start of Tuesday’s game, his freedom.

Meek Mill received a groundswell of support throughout his incarceration from members of the 76ers and Super Bowl champion Eagles and other public figures, including 76ers co-owner Michael Rubin and New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft.

Ohio State lands grad transfer Keyshawn Woods

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With three of the team’s top five scorers from this season, led by Big Ten Player of the Year Keita Bates-Diop, moving on Ohio State entered the offseason in need of players who could potentially have an immediate impact in 2018-19.

Tuesday evening the Buckeyes picked up a commitment from a grad transfer, as former Wake Forest guard Keyshawn Woods announced that he will play his final season at Ohio State.

Woods appeared in 28 games for the Demon Deacons in 2017-18, averaging 11.9 points, 2.5 rebounds and 1.9 assists in 25.7 minutes per game. The 6-foot-3 guard was used primarily as a reserve this past season, making just five starts for Wake Forest. Woods began his collegiate career at Charlotte, playing the 2014-15 season there before transferring to Wake Forest.

During the 2016-17 season, the first in which he was eligible to play at Wake Forest, Woods started 22 of the 33 games he played in and averaged 12.5 points, 4.2 rebounds and 3.5 assists per game. Woods shot 49.5 percent from the field and 43.8 percent from three during that campaign, and the hope in Columbus is that he can get back to that level in his lone season as a Buckeye.

Ohio State’s best returnee on the perimeter next season will be rising junior C.J. Jackson, who averaged 12.6 points, 3.9 rebounds and 3.9 assists per game as a sophomore. Ohio State also adds a talented freshman class that includes guards Duane Washington Jr. and Luther Muhammad. Florida State transfer C.J. Walker will have two seasons of eligibility remaining after sitting out the upcoming campaign per NCAA transfer rules.