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ACC Conference Reset: Get caught up on all of the league’s offseason wheelings and dealings

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The NBA Draft’s Early Entry Deadline has come and gone. Just about every elite recruit has decided where they will be playing their college ball next season. The coaching carousel, which ended up spinning a bit faster than initially expected, has come to a close. The transfer market is slowly winding down.  

In other words, by now, we have a pretty good feel for what college basketball is going to look like during the 2017-18 season. With that in mind, let’s take a look at what has happened — and what will happen — in the ACC over the next six months. 


1. Is ‘Is Duke Back???’ going to be a thing again next season?: Unfortunately, it probably will be.

Last year, as the preseason No. 1 team in the country battled injuries and inconsistency, the question of whether or not Duke is back became a consistent talking point. While Duke lost Jayson Tatum, Luke Kennard, Amile Jefferson, Frank Jackson and Harry Giles III this offseason, they not only returned Grayson Allen and Marques Bolden, they added a terrific recruiting class — headlined by five-stars Wendell Carter and Gary Trent Jr. — that was bolstered by the May addition of Trevon Duval.

I know you guys don’t want to hear me say it, but … Duke is going to be a top five team with as much talent as anyone in the country. They are the favorite to win the ACC.

2. Tony Bradley, one-and-dones and UNC’s NCAA investigation: There’s a lot to unpack here. For starters, Tony Bradley became UNC’s first one-and-done player since Brandon Wright and just the third one-and-done player in Roy Williams’ tenure when he signed with an agent last week. Part of this is because Williams has not proven the ability to get elite talent straight to the NBA, and part of that is a direct result on missing a number of elite talents due to the looming NCAA investigation into academic fraud, which, mercifully, is on track to come to an end at some point later this year … (we hope).

Does that mean that Williams will now be able to recruit one-and-done players, like Kevin Knox or Brandon Ingram, to UNC? The better question is whether or not he actually needs to.

Since the one-and-done rule came into effect before the 2006-07 season, Williams has won two national titles, been to four Final Fours and taken home seven ACC regular season titles. Mike Krzyzewski, in contrast, has won two national titles (only one of which came with a one-and-done player on it) in the only two Final Fours that he’s been to while winning just a single ACC regular season title.

Who has been more successful?

Grayson Allen (Photo by Chet Strange/Getty Images)

3. Duke and UNC traded rosters: Roy Williams is one of the few coaches that has bucked the small-ball trend, opting to roll out rosters that feature two bigs that do their damage within eight-feet of the rim. Mike Krzyzewski, on the other hand, has relied more and more on small-ball lineups, with Jabari Parker, Justise Winslow, Brandon Ingram and Jayson Tatum — hell, even Ryan Kelly and Kyle Singler fall into that category — playing the majority of their minutes at the four.

With Duke missing on Kevin Knox, Coach K is going to be counting on Marques Bolden, a five through-and-through, and Wendell Carter, a top five recruit and a beast of a low-post scorer, to play in his front court together. Ol’ Roy, on the other hand, is probably looking at a situation where Theo Pinson sees quite a few minutes at the four while Joel Berry II, Jalek Felton and Kenny Williams roam the perimeter.

This is what happens when rosters are overhauled every spring.

4. So where does Cameron Johnson end up?: This is the major question in the ACC hierarchy. Johnson is a 6-foot-8 forward that averaged 11.9 points and shoots threes at a 42 percent clip. He’s also a grad transfer from Pitt that has two years of eligibility remaining, but is being barred by the Panthers from transferring within the ACC. North Carolina wants him, and looks like the best landing spot for a team that needs perimeter shooting and a player that doesn’t seem to fit into the rotation at Kentucky, Arizona or UCLA anymore.

Stallings has been crushed in the media of late for his refusal to unblock ACC schools, and it doesn’t seem like he’s going to be willing to relent anytime soon.

5. Can Miami actually win an ACC title?: Simply put: Yes, they can. They won one in 2013 and finishing a game out of first place in 2016, and this season, they should end up being just as talented as they were when they won the league. JaQuan Newton will be the veteran presence in the back court while Bruce Brown should be expected to develop into a player that can push for ACC Player of the Year and All-American honors this season. Throw in a five-star recruit in off-guard Lonnie Walker and a former five-star big man in Dewan Huell, and the talent and coaching is there for the Hurricanes. Don’t be surprised when Miami is back near the top of the ACC come February.

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6. Is this the year that Notre Dame and Virginia fall off?: Mike Brey and Tony Bennett are two of the best coaches in the country at establishing tradition and culture, developing the players they recruit to be stars by the time they are juniors and senior. At some point, however, consistently losing key pieces is going to catch up to them, and both the Irish and the Wahoos are looking at something of a youth movement this year.

Notre Dame does return seniors Bonzie Colson and Matt Farrell, but they are going to be relying heavily on inexperienced players like Temple Gibbs, Rex Pflueger and D.J. Harvey to play major minutes. UVA, on the other hand, is nearing a full rebuild, as they look to replace London Perrantes and a pair of rising seniors that transferred out of the program with a Rutgers transfer and a slew of talented, but inexperienced, freshmen and sophomores.


  • Trevon Duval, Duke: Duke reeled in three five-star prospects this summer, including big man Wendell Carter and Gary Trent Jr., but the real story here is that they finally landed a point guard to replace Tyus Jones three seasons later. Is he the piece that finally puts it all together for the Blue Devils?
  • Lonnie Walker, Miami: The Hurricanes are going to be much better than you think they will be, largely due to the fact that I expect sophomore Bruce Brown to be a star. But Lonnie Walker, a five-star shooting guard that Miami outdueled Villanova and Arizona for, was a monster addition.
  • Jalek Felton, North Carolina: Is small-ball in the cards for the Tar Heels this season? If it is, Felton, the back-end five-star recruit that Roy Williams seems to thrive with every year, should see a lot of minutes next to Joel Berry II.
  • D.J. Harvey, Notre Dame: Harvey was, at one point, a top ten prospect in the class. He graduated as a top 50 recruit, but he’s a skilled, versatile 6-foot-7 wing, which is precisely the kind of player that Mike Brey thrives with.


  • Donovan Mitchell, Louisville: I still like this Louisville roster and expect them to be a top ten team this season, but man, losing Donovan Mitchell to the NBA is a shot to the gut. I’m an admitted Mitchell stan, but I would have had the Cardinals as the preseason No. 1 team and Mitchell as a National Player of the Year contender had he returned.
  • Frank Jackson, Duke: It doesn’t take a genius to read through the tea leaves and see that Jackson leaving Duke to likely end up in the second round of the NBA Draft coincided with Trevon Duval’s decision to enroll. The loss still hurts, however, because he would have been awesome sharing a back court with Duval, Grayson Allen and Gary Trent Jr.
  • Tony Bradley, North Carolina: The loss of Bradley hurts UNC because it’s pretty clear that the Tar Heels had built their roster around having him on campus for at least one more season. He would have been in the all-american discussion had he returned.


  • Kevin Keatts, N.C. State: Keatts left UNC Wilmington and replaced Mark Gottfried in Raleigh, and he’s already started to load up on talent, convincing Omer Yurtseven to return to school while adding transfer Al Freeman (Baylor), C.J. Bryce (UNCW) and Devon Daniels (Utah). Getting players won’t be his problem, and it wasn’t Gottfried’s. Turning that talent into wins is where the former Wolfpack man struggled, and it will be on Keatts to buck that trend.
Bonzie Colson (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)


Joel Berry II, North Carolina (Player of the Year)
Grayson Allen, Duke
Bonzie Colson, Notre Dame
Bruce Brown, Miami
Deng Adel, Louisville


  1. Duke: Duke has plenty of talent next season. Trevon Duval, Grayson Allen and Wendell Carter is as talented of a top three as you’ll find. The key will be how all the pieces fit together.
  2. Miami: The Hurricanes will enter 2017-18 with the nation’s most underrated backcourt with Bruce Brown, Lonnie Walker and JaQuan Newton, and Jim Larrañaga is as good as anyone at using elite guards.
  3. Louisville: I’m going to go long on Louisville here. Losing Donovan Mitchell hurt; before he signed with an agent, when it looked like he may return to school, we had the Cardinals as the preseason No. 1 team in the country. But Deng Adel is returning, giving a team that struggled offensively last season a go-to scorer, and with a core of young and athletic talents, particularly in the front court, Rick Pitino should have another top ten-caliber roster to work with. Their ceiling will be determined by how the likes of V.J. King, Ray Spalding and Anas Mahmoud develop.
  4. North Carolina: Losing Tony Bradley was a killer. Well, ‘killer’ may be too strong, but with him back in the fold, the Tar Heels looked like a top five team.
  5. Notre Dame: The Fighting Irish have reached the point where I’m just going to assume they will be a top 25 team pushing for top four in the ACC every preseason. Bonzie Colson and Matt Farrell are back to carry the load again.
  6. Virginia Tech: The Hokies lose Zach LeDay and Seth Allen, but they add Nickeil Alexander-Walker, get Chris Clarke healthy and return basically everyone else of relevance.
  7. Virginia: Losing London Perrantes hurts, but the Wahoos added a veteran point guard in Nigel Johnson to a roster with quite a bit of young talent. I think they’re a year away.
  8. N.C. State: Keatts has already added some pieces to a roster with talent on it. The big question is going to be how they adjust to his style of play?
  9. Syracuse: The Orange graduate John Gillon and Andrew White while losing Tyler Lydon to the draft. Once again, they’re going to be looking for a point guard. What does Tyus Battle turn into?
  10. Florida State: Replacing Jonathan Isaac, Dwayne Bacon and Xavier Rathan-Mayes won’t be easy, but bring in five-star M.J. Walker will help.
  11. Wake Forest: John Collins’ development into a star happened one year too soon, but Danny Manning does have some solid back court talent returning and joining the program.
  12. Clemson: It has to be frustrating for Brad Brownell that he couldn’t get back to the NCAA tournament with Jaron Blossomgame back. I don’t think it’s out of the question that Brownell could get there with this roster, however.
  13. Georgia Tech: Josh Pastner put together a surprisingly good first season in Atlanta. Ben Lammers return was massive. What does Josh Okogie develop into?
  14. Boston College: The duo of Jerome Robinson and Ky Bowman will be good. Will there be enough around them to get the Eagles out of the ACC basement?
  15. Pittsburgh: Six players transferred out of Pitt this offseason. At this point, are we sure that Kevin Stallings will have enough players on his roster to field a team this fall.

VIDEO: Kansas State legend celebrates revenge on Kentucky 67 years in the making

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In 1951, Kansas State lost to Kentucky in the National Championship game.

Ernie Barrett, who eventually became the school’s athletic director and is known as “Mr. K-State“, played on that team.

He’s wanted to get revenge on Big Blue ever since.

On Thursday night, Kansas State did.

Ernie was there, and here was his reaction in the locker room:

Keenan Evans perseveres through toe injury as Texas Tech looks to get through the East Region

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BOSTON — It was a gut punch when they got the call.

After a dreadful 3-15 freshman season, Tubby Smith had turned Texas Tech around his sophomore year, when Keenan Evans had averaged 8.7 points and 2.9 assists, respectable enough given the role that Tubby asks his point guards to play. The core of that team — a sophomore class that also included Zach Smith, Justin Gray and Norense Odiase — were returning. Tubby was making some in-roads in Texas. Everything was pointing up.

And then the former Kentucky head coach left for Memphis, a job that would chew him up and spit him out within two years.

“As parents, we definitely thought about what his next step would be,” Kenny Evans said. Who would Texas Tech hire? What if they didn’t like him? What if he didn’t like Keenan? It didn’t help matters that the Evans family had a weird and unique bond with Tubby.

The Evans’ family is as athletic as athletic gets. Keenan’s basketball IQ and guile come from his mom, Shantell, who was an all-SWAC guard at Arkansas-Pine Bluff. His athleticism comes from his dad, Kenny, who was an Olympic high-jumper. He finished 13th in the 2000 Summer Games in Sydney, which also happened to be the Games where Tubby was an assistant coach for USA Basketball. Kenny, an Arkansas-native and high school basketball star, knew who Tubby Smith was; he was less than two years removed from winning a national title out of the same conference as his Razorbacks, and Kenny says he idolized Nolan Richardson and his Arkansas teams.

“You don’t see a lot of celebrities in Arkansas,” Kenny said, so when the Track & Field team was put next to the USA Basketball team, he did what any red-blooded American would do: He asked them for pictures.

One of those pictures was with Tubby — Kenny’s mother was a fan — and that picture ended up being displayed in the Evans house for years to come.

Suffice to say, Tubby’s name carried some weight with the family. It was part of what made Keenan decide to play at Texas Tech. And it’s one of the reasons why Keenan’s parents wanted to do their homework on the good ole’ boy Tech hired that was on his third job in three weeks, his sixth job in six seasons and a little more than four years removed from coaching in the ABA.

(Tom Pennington/Getty Images)

Chris Beard’s roots run deep in Texas.

He went to high school just outside Houston. He was a manager at Texas during his time as a student. After graduating, he spent 14 of the next 16 seasons coaching in Texas, with one-year layovers at Junior Colleges in Kansas and Oklahoma along the way.

Throw in a one-year stay with the South Carolina Warriors and one season with Arkansas-Little Rock, and Beard lived outside Texas for just four years since childhood. And, as his assistant coach Chris Ogden puts it, “Beard’s a relationship guy.” He knows people all over the state, and when he got the job at Texas Tech — where he had previously been an Associate Head Coach under Bobby Knight — Kenny started getting calls from people vouching for him.

Give him a chance.

He may not have the national title-pedigree that Tubby does, but he’s got a shot at getting there one day.

Hear him out.

And Beard made sure they would have the chance to do so. Almost immediately after setting foot in Lubbock, the new Tech staff got to work trying to develop relationships with his new players and their families. Beard had a one-on-one meeting with every single member of the Texas Tech roster, which is not uncommon. He then took a flight to meet with the family of every member of his team. To sit down in front of them, look them in the eye and get to know them personally, as more than just the people that his players hear from when they go over their data plan or when those on-campus parking tickets start to add up.

“When I called them to let them know that Coach Beard said he was going to fly out to see [them], they were kind of shook,” Keenan said. “‘Wow, he’s really going to fly to everybody’s family around the country?’ They were really in shock and that stood out to them as well.”

“Not a lot of coaches do that. Fly to each person’s family, sit down and meet them, introduce himself. That played a big part in [my decision to stay] as well.”

The other part of it was that Keenan believed in the plan, in the vision that Beard had, for both the program and himself.

You see, the way Tubby uses his point guard is different than the way Beard does.

“Tubby is more old school,” Kenny explains. “He envisioned his point guards not shooting much and running the offense. Chris is new school. He recognizes you need to me more dynamic at the point guard spot. You gotta be a threat to score to get assists.”

And Beard knew he had the guy he needed in Keenan.

The staff was not unfamiliar with him when they took over. Ogden had recruited Keenan’s high school teammates, so he had seen him plenty. They knew what Keenan would be able to do when unleashed, and they knew what kind of a player and a worker they were inheriting.

“I just believed in his process, believed that he wanted to win at this level,” Evans said. “He believed in me, so I believed in him, and he gave me an opportunity. And he’s still doing that.”

“What I’m most appreciative of Keenan is he basically trusted me before he had to. He basically took me at my word,” Beard said. “He trusted me from day one, and I asked him to do a lot of things that he had never done before in his career.”

It paid off.

Tech struggled last season, but as a senior, Keenan morphed into one of college basketball’s best players. He’s averaging 17.8 points, 3.2 assists and 3.2 boards entering Friday’s Sweet 16 matchup with Purdue, numbers that would have been more impressive in a year that could have truly been legendary if it wasn’t for an awkward landing after a jump shot that resulted in unfortunate toe injury that Keenan suffered at Baylor on February 17th.

Keenan did not play in the second half of that game. He did play at at Oklahoma State and against Kansas in the two subsequent games, but anyone watching knew that he wasn’t himself. He sat out a road trip to West Virginia.

Four straight losses.

Sole possession of first place in the Big 12 with a home game left against Kansas and a grasp on Big 12 Player of the Year turned into just another victim of the Jayhawks’ 14-year reign over the conference.

And if you don’t think that was hard for Keenan to handle, you don’t know Keenan.

(Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

Keenan Evans has always picked up on things quickly.

Everyone has that one friend that is annoyingly good at everything, whether it’s pool, or bowling, or Fortnite. That’s Keenan, and that’s why Keenan’s mom — an all-conference basketball player herself — had to stop training him by the time he was in the fourth grade.

He was just getting too good, too quickly.

That can be a slippery slope. If you’re a natural, if things come too easily to you, work ethic might not be your forte. With Keenan, it worked the other way. When he got good at one thing, he wanted to perfect the next thing. The best are the best because they are addicted to improvement, and Keenan falls into that category.

“The Keenan Evans story is not me or Tubby,” Beard said. “It is Keenan Evans. This guy self-made himself into one of the best players in college basketball, and I can tell you how he’s done it. He’s done it with a lot of work. He’s in the gym every day. He’s in the film room a lot. He’s a guy that’s changed his body in the weight room.”

That’s what made this toe issue so devastating.

We’re talking about a guy that is known within the Texas Tech locker room as being their hardest work. Three-a-days in the gym. He’s made himself into a star. He earned his shot at getting a Big 12 title and a Player of the Year award, and it got taken away from him.

Because of a toe.

“Simply stated, a lot of guys wouldn’t even be playing on it right now,” Beard said. “Keenan is playing on it and playing at a high level. He’s just an absolute warrior.”

“I’ve never coached a tougher guy than Keenan Evans.”

“It was tough to overcome just because I felt like I was letting my team down in a way,” Keenan said. “It wasn’t my fault, but also [my toe’s] just not 100 percent, and I still battle with it every night.”

According to Kenny, the struggle was as much mental as physical.

“It was devastating for him,” he said. “He tried to be strong for his teammates. He could have shut it down and gotten ready for everything after college. But that’s not us, that’s not our family, that’s not Keenan.”

He does his best to stay off the foot when he’s not playing games. His time on the practice floor is limited. When media is granted access to the Texas Tech locker room, Keenan’s foot is in a big, yellow bucket full of ice water. He doesn’t have the same explosiveness. He can’t push off of it the way he did before the injury. And that’s before you get to the mental side of it, having the confidence in himself and his body to be able to try and do the things he’s been doing all season long.

And in this tournament, it’s worked.

Keenan has scored 45 points through two games, and 33 of those 45 points have come in the second half. He made every shot he took in the second half of a come-from-behind win over Stephen F. Austin in the opener. He hit the go-ahead three and threw a lob to Zhaire Smith for the clinching basket in the final two minutes of the win over Florida. All told, in his last five games, Evans is averaging 17 of his 21.2 points and shooting 26-for-37 from the floor after halftime.

He is Texas Tech’s closer, and with a date against No. 2-seed Purdue in the Sweet 16 on Friday night, Evans will likely be called upon to close once again.

Just the way Beard likes it.

“I just love coaching him,” he said. “I just don’t want it to end. I want to coach that guy another day. It is like when you go to a good movie and you know it’s getting towards the end, but you are loving the movie so much, you want it to go a little bit farther. Or you’ve got a good plate of enchiladas and you’re looking at it, and you only have two bites left, but it’s so good, you turn it into three bites.”

“I want it to keep lasting.”

The end was disappointing, but Kentucky’s season outpaced all expectation

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In yet another example of what makes March Madness the greatest and most unpredictable sporting spectacle on the planet, Kentucky’s run to the Sweet 16 this season is going to be looked at as a disappointment.

Who saw that coming back in January?

Who thought that this team had second weekend potential when they were in the midst of the first four-game losing streak of John Calipari’s tenure in Lexington?

And please, show me who, at that point in time, predicted that Kentucky media would be calling a loss in the Sweet 16 “the worst loss” in the Calipari era back when there were actual discussions being had over whether or not the Wildcats were going to get into the NCAA tournament?

It’s amazing how quickly the tide turns in college basketball

Kentucky lost on Thursday night. The fifth-seeded Wildcats fell to the ninth-seeded Wildcats of Kansas State in a game that turned into drama-filled slugfest down the stretch. The final score was 61-58. Kentucky had two shots at the end of regulation to force a tie or take the lead. They also gave up an offensive rebound to a 6-foot-3 no-name with 40 seconds left that led to the game-winning bucket.

The narrative is going to be that Kentucky choked this game away, that their inability to run offense — and P.J. Washington’s free throw yips — cost them the Final Four that seemed a given Thursday morning and a pipe dream on Selection Sunday.

The truth is that Kentucky was a flawed basketball team that got hot at the right time before running into a team that executed a game-plan to perfection while getting the benefit of a couple of bounces and whistles going their way.

And let me be perfectly clear: In no way, shape or form am I saying that Kentucky or Big Blue Nation should be happy with this loss. It should be disappointing. It should hurt — more so for the players than the fans, but whatever. The bracket broke perfectly for them. Everyone in their region was a cinderella. We weren’t wrong in thinking that Coach Cal’s kids were the heavy favorites to get to San Antonio out of Catlanta.

But we need to say that while also acknowledging this: There is a reason that Kentucky was a No. 5-seed this season.

This was a flawed basketball team.

They were young. They didn’t have enough shooting. Their offense was entirely too predictable, even when they were winning. If Shai Gilgeous-Alexander and Kevin Knox weren’t carrying the load for them on that end, they didn’t really have anywhere to turn. And on Thursday night, they ran into a team that had the personnel and a game-plan to take away Kentucky’s two go-to guys.

Kansas State is not overly talented, but what they have in abundance are tough, athletic and older guards that are going to put in a shift on the defensive end of the floor. Kentucky fans may not know who Barry Brown is, but I guarantee you that fans of every Big 12 team can tell you just how good he can be. I guarantee that coaches in the Big 12 can tell you just how annoying their guards are, and those little guards played that role to perfection.

To put it another way, it wasn’t a fluke that Gilgeous-Alexander struggled to make plays off the dribble the way he has for the last two months of the season. It wasn’t an accident that Kevin Knox struggled to find a way to get the looks he had become accustomed to getting coming off of Kentucky’s circle sets.

And in a 40 minute basketball game, when one team matches up well with another, something as simple as Xavier Sneed catching fire and Washington going 8-for-20 from the foul line will get you beat.

But that’s neither here nor there.

Because the real point that I am trying to make here is that this particular Kentucky team just wasn’t all that good. They were young. They were injured. They had their flaws masked by the improvement of a couple of kids who played out of their minds for long stretches of the season, and I just don’t think that’s something that should be overlooked.

Maybe this is just my mindset as a fan. I enjoy the ride more than I need to celebrate the ending. Give me a reason to tune in every game. Make me excited to have the monotony of a week broken up when the ball tips. I’m good.

And I think this Kentucky team accomplished just that.

But two weeks ago, no one thought this team had a shot of getting to the Elite 8. Two months ago, every Kentucky fan would have taken a trip to the second weekend in a heartbeat.

The ending sucked.

No doubt about it.

But this team kept fighting and kept improving and, in the end, lost because someone took makeup remover to the cosmetics that Calipari applied.

Be disappointed, but don’t lost sight of the big picture.

VIDEO: Townes’ late 3 seals Loyola’s win over Nevada

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Nevada was faced with a dilemma. The Wolf Pack were down just one possession – just one point – and were on defense with with a five-second differential between the game and shot clocks.

Foul and extend the game or play it out and hope for a stop?

Nevada opted to play it straight-up, and Loyola hit them with the worst-case scenario – a 3-pointer at the end of the shot clock.

The 3-pointer from Marques Townes made it a two-possession game and the clock all but ruled out the possibility for two possession.

And that’s why Loyola is now in the Elite Eight.

2018 NCAA Tournament: Saturday’s tip times, TV channels, announcer pairings

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Half the spots in the Final Four are up for grabs Saturday. Be sure you know where your TV needs to be before the nets are cut down.

Atlanta: Brian Anderson, Chris Webber and Lisa Byington

  • 6:09 p.m. – No. 9 Kansas State vs. No. 11 Loyola, TBS

Los Angeles: Kevin Harlan, Reggie Miller, Dan Bonner and Dana Jacobson

  • 8:49 – No. 3 Michigan vs. No. 9 Florida State, TBS