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Kansas AD confident in hoops program dogged by issues

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LAWRENCE, Kan. — Kansas athletic director Sheahon Zenger understands people may have questions about the many legal issues surrounding the Jayhawks’ storied basketball program, an avalanche of off-the-court news that in recent weeks has cast a shadow over Allen Fieldhouse.

He also hopes people understand many of them cannot be discussed publicly.

In a wide-ranging interview with The Associated Press, Zenger maintained his confidence in Kansas coach Bill Self’s handling of the program and insisted the athletic department has “a very healthy” relationship with the university and local law enforcement.

“There are many legal and ethical reasons I can’t discuss anything that’s ongoing, primarily any investigations,” Zenger said. “All I can tell you is this university and this athletic department will forever be committed to its core values, and its priorities of all students, staff and guests.”

Still, the past few weeks have been dominated by headlines the Jayhawks could do without.

It began with news that police are investigating a reported rape at McCarthy Hall, the $12 million dormitory that houses the men’s basketball team and other students. No suspects have been identified in connection with the incident the night of Dec. 17. Five members of the team are listed as witnesses.

During the investigation, police uncovered two glass smoking devices with residue inside. Sophomore forward Carlton Bragg Jr. was charged with misdemeanor possession in that case and promptly suspended, a punishment that was lifted this week when he was granted diversion. Bragg was also arrested in December following an altercation with a woman, but a charge of domestic violence was dropped when video evidence suggested he was acting in self-defense.

More bad news hit last week when The Kansas City Star reported sophomore guard Lagerald Vick may have struck a female student two years ago. The school’s Office of Institutional Opportunity and Access investigated the case and recommended he receive school probation.

Meanwhile, star freshman Josh Jackson and Vick have been linked to a vandalism investigation stemming from an incident in December, when a vehicle sustained nearly $3,000 in damage outside a Lawrence bar.

Those are damaging cases individually. Taken collectively, the reports have overshadowed just about everything the third-ranked Jayhawks have accomplished on the court, from their win over Kentucky at Rupp Arena to their defeat of then-No. 2 Baylor to their season sweep of rival Kansas State. The team’s pursuit of an unfathomable 13th Big 12 Conference title is alive and well.

“I can’t really speak to why or how that’s happened,” Zenger said of the cases stacking up. “All I can tell you is we have to stay focused on being true to our values.”

Yet the legal issues have put Self in a delicate situation.

On the one hand, he has to maintain order within a program that some critics argue already has gone rogue, where athletes who generate millions of dollars for the school often appear coddled or favored. On the other hand, his players deserve to be treated like anybody else accused of a crime or misconduct, and that means allowing any investigations to run their course.

“We don’t have anything to do with how the police does their job, nor would we interfere,” Self said. “I would tell you this, Carlton Bragg or your son or your daughter or anybody else who is a student here should be treated the exact same. I’m not running from that at all.”

Zenger said he speaks frequently with donors, many of whom have contributed millions to the program and sit courtside at Allen Fieldhouse, and nobody has expressed concern about the legal problems.

“I think our fans and donors, they’ve been around a long time,” he said. “They’ve followed this program a long time. They have a lot of faith in the university, in Coach Self and in doing things the right way. I believe everyone is being patient and thoughtful.”

Zenger also has no issue with Self operating as a de-facto school spokesman.

After all, the coach is the highest-paid employee of the university, along with the most visible. And it’s a burden the even-keeled Self has assumed before, whether during controversies that brought down football coach Mark Mangino or a messy ticket scandal that surfaced several years ago.

“We’re focused on basketball. That’s our job,” point guard Frank Mason III explained. “We don’t focus on anything outside of that, besides school. Just let coach deal with all of that. We’re just here to play ball.”

There is hope around Lawrence that the cases will be resolved in the coming weeks, before the Jayhawks head to Kansas City for the Big 12 Tournament. And certainly before they are thrust onto the national stage of the NCAA Tournament, chasing their sixth national title and first since 2008.

But that remains out of Zenger’s hands, he insisted. All he can do is keep preaching patience.

“We just have to weather the time period when there may be incomplete or inaccurate public conversations,” he said, “We do that as you ought to in this country, to protect all the individuals, all the people, everyone involved in any investigations, or more broadly the investigative process.”

More AP college basketball: http://www.collegebasketball.ap.org and https://twitter.com/AP-Top25

VIDEO: LaVar Ball gets female ref replaced after threatening to pull team from court

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A female referee was removed from a Big Ballers game after LaVar Ball threatened to pull his team from the court for the second time in a week.

The referee called Ball for a technical foul, which sparked the confrontation, but both Ball and an adidas rep told ESPN’s Jeff Borzello that the reason the ref was pulled was because she and Ball had a previous issue:

Before the game was over, Ball would receive a second technical foul and the game was eventually called with two minutes left and Big Ballers losing by 10.

Western Kentucky’s five-star recruit Mitchell Robinson has left campus

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The soap opera that has been Mitchell Robinson’s tenure at Western Kentucky took another on Friday, as the five-star center and top ten prospect in the Class of 2017 has reportedly left campus.

Robinson was a massive coup for Rick Stansbury when he committed to and signed for the Hilltoppers, but it has been non-stop drama since then. Less than two weeks after his commitment, Robinson tweeted that he would be decommitting from WKU before immediately deleting the tweet and claiming that his account was hacked. Robinson did not attend the first session of summer school on campus, and he was in class in the second summer school session and reportedly practicing with the team this month for a trip to Costa Rica, but he cleaned out his dorm room and left the campus last night.

Part of the reason that Robinson opted to go to Western Kentucky was that his godfather, former UNC star Shammond Williams, was an assistant coach on the staff. Williams left the program on July 3rd, and ever since then there have been questions surrounding where Robinson will play this season. There have been rumors that he will be heading overseas for a year before entering the 2018 NBA Draft, and there is also the potential that Robinson could end up transferring to a different college.

The question, however, is whether or not Robinson will be able to transfer and play immediately without sitting out a year since he enrolled in summer school.

Robinson is a 7-foot center and a terrific defensive prospect that is projected as a first round pick next year. If he does get a waiver to transfer, he immediately becomes the best available talent on the market, along with Marvin Bagley III, who is considering reclassifying.

Virginia, Seton Hall, Rhode Island, Vandy in NIT Tip-Off

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NEW YORK (AP) — Virginia and Vanderbilt will meet in one semifinal of the NIT Preseason Tip-Off on Thanksgiving Day at Barclays Center.

Rhode Island and Seton Hall face off in the other semifinal with the winners meeting on Friday, Nov. 24.

This is the third straight year the Tip-Off has been held at Barclays Center. Eventual NCAA champion Villanova won the event in 2015. All games will be televised on ESPNU.

Non-bracketed teams in the NIT Season Tip-Off who will play games at campus sites are: Austin Peay, Fairleigh Dickinson, Monmouth, Oakland City and UNC Asheville.

Miles Bridges explain why he returned to Michigan State

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Miles Bridges changed the landscape of the 2017-18 college basketball season on April 13.

The Michigan State forward spurned the NBA for another year in East Lansing. The decision not only meant that Bridges was a frontrunner for national player of the year, but solidified the Spartans as a national title contender.

But Bridges’ choice to return was still puzzling to many. The 6-foot-7 forward was projected as a lottery pick. Bridges explained his decision to Mike Decourcy of Sporting News in a story published on Thursday.

“He says, ‘You know what, Coach? I want to get better. I don’t want to be in the D-League. I’ve got buddies that are, and I just want to make sure when I go, I’m ready,’ ” Izzo recalled to Sporting News. “I looked at him and I said, ‘Done deal.’ For me, that was a done deal. It was a reasonable, sensible argument.”

Agents, friends, reporters, scouts, acquaintances, fans, strangers and family members — oh and, as we said, coaches — all had one opinion about how Bridges should spend the next year of his life. Miles had another, opposing, viewpoint.

Bridges told Decourcy that support came from his teammates, many of whom were returning to the team as well. Assuming the backcourt of Cassius Winston and Josh Langford make a leap forward, as well as incoming freshman Jaren Jackson providing an immediate impact, the Spartans’ title hopes could become a reality.

Bridges averaged 16.9 points, 8.3 boards, 2.1 assists and 1.5 blocks as a freshman at Michigan State. He’s rated as the No. 5 overall pick in the 2018 NBA Draft by DraftExpress.

Four conferences sign on to basketball officiating alliance

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GREENSBORO, N.C. (AP) — Four more Division I conferences will join a men’s basketball officiating alliance formed last year by the Atlantic Coast Conference, the Big East, the Atlantic 10 and Colonial Athletic Association.

The Big South, the Ivy League, the Northeast and the Patriot League are joining ahead of the 2017-18 season, according to announcements from the leagues Thursday. The alliance launched last summer for conferences to work together on officiating matters and enhance training, development, recruitment, retention and feedback for officials.

John Cahill, the Big East’s supervisor of officials, and Bryan Kersey, the ACC’s coordinator of men’s basketball officiating, will continue to lead the alliance operations.

ACC commissioner John Swofford says the new additions to the alliance “provide an even greater opportunity to build chemistry and quality” across the officiating ranks.