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Louisville lands recruit over Providence, proves college hoops hierarchy exists

Kelly Kline/Under Armour

Providence recruited Donovan Mitchell, a talented lead guard in the Class of 2015, as well as any program can recruit a player.

For two years, the coaching staff stalked him, building a relationship and watching his games and doing all the little things that it takes to convince a kid to come to your college to play basketball for you. They didn’t stop recruiting him when a broken wrist kept him out the summer after his sophomore season and their interest didn’t fluctuate when Mitchell’s ranking on the major recruiting websites remained in the borderline top 100 range. They were, many believed, the favorites to land his services.

This summer, the Friars were court side for every game that Mitchell played during the July live period, with at least one assistant and, often times, head coach Ed Cooley getting a front row look as Mitchell’s stock began to soar. From Philly to Springfield to Atlanta to Vegas, the Friars trailed Mitchell as he put together sterling performance after sterling performance, collecting scholarship offer after scholarship offer.

When it was all said and done, Mitchell had gone from a borderline top 100 recruit to a borderline five-star recruit; from a kid that was a target for the high-major programs in the northeast to someone that was being targeted by heavily by one of the nation’s best basketball programs, Louisville.

MORE: Donovan Mitchell’s recruitment blows up

He played his best basketball in front of the right people at the right time, and it was all over for Providence before they even knew what hit them. Last Thursday, less than a month from the time he received an offer from the Cardinals, Mitchell committed during a visit to the campus. He never even took an official visit to Providence.

That’s the kind of miss of the recruiting trail that is going to sting, but it’s also one that schools like Providence know all too well. The best programs are going to get the best players, and often times it doesn’t matter how good a relationship with a coaching staff is or how much effort one program has put into a kid’s recruitment.

They want to play for the best programs in the country, which is why Mitchell’s recruitment is a textbook example of why granting the Power 5 conferences the autonomy to play their athletes a stipend isn’t going to significantly change the power structure in college basketball. I wrote about that very point extensively here.

RELATED: What does Power 5 autonomy mean for college hoops?

Louisville won the 2013 national title a year after playing in the 2012 Final Four. The school will make the jump from the American to the ACC this season, putting itself in what is likely the nation’s premier basketball conference. He’ll play every meaningful game in his career on national television, and there will be a lot of meaningful games during the years that he spends on campus. He’ll compete for league championships and national titles. He’ll play in front of 22,090 fans every time the Cardinals take the court at the KFC Yum! Center.

That said, Providence isn’t a bad program. Cooley has done a terrific job rebooting that program despite the fact that arguably the three best recruits that he’s brought to campus in his tenure — Ricky Ledo, Kris Dunn and Brandon Austin — have done next to nothing in a Friar uniform. He’s got a very good 2014 recruiting class entering the program this season and his 2015 class is off to a good start. In Cooley’s third season, the Friars made the NCAA tournament for the first time in a decade, and sent their star guard to the NBA.

They’re peaking right now. Outside of Villanova — maybe — I’d say there is an argument to be made that Providence has the brightest future of any program in the Big East.

But none of that changes the fact that Providence isn’t Louisville.

And this is without Louisville having the ability to pay for full cost of attendance scholarships or to fly family members of their players to NCAA tournament or all of those things that the Power 5 conference schools are going to be able to provide with the new autonomy ruling.

So if Providence loses a kid it prioritized for two years to Louisville, who recruited him for a month. What is really going to change when the rules change?

No. 25 Texas A&M outlasts No. 10 Gonzaga

Billy Kennedy
AP Photo/Chuck Burton
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No. 25 Texas A&M made a statement on Turkey Day, as they knocked off No. 10 Gonzaga 62-61 in the semifinals of the Battle 4 Atlantis.

Danuel House led the way with 19 points for the Aggies while Tony Trocha-Morales finished with 14 points as Texas A&M picked up the win despite the fact that they did not score for the final eight minutes of the game.

Billy Kennedy’s club looked the part of an SEC contender, playing tough defense and keeping Gonzaga’s massive and talented front line in check. Perhaps most impressive was that they were able to hang on despite blowing a lead late in the second half, and that they did it with their defense. Gonzaga can score. They have big bodies inside and shooters to surround them, but Domantas Sabonis struggled with foul struggle throughout the game while Kyle Wiltjer did not score in the final 12 minutes.

Kentucky, at this point, is the clear-cut favorite in the SEC, and while Vanderbilt looked really good in Maui this week, A&M looks like they’re going to end up giving the Commodores a run for their money for second-best in the league.

On the other hand, this loss wasn’t a total disaster for the Zags. They had the final possession with a chance to be a good team on a day when Domantas Sabonis was rendered completely ineffective. And, more importantly, point guard Josh Perkins was terrific. He did have a late turnover, but he scored all 15 of his points in the second half as he helped keep the Zags within striking distance.

Texas A&M will play the winner of Syracuse and No. 18 UConn for the title.

PREGAME SHOOTAROUND: Thanksgiving Day Edition!

Kevin Ollie
(AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo)
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GAME OF THE NIGHT: Syracuse vs. No. 18 UConn, 3:30 p.m.

For the first time since the Orange departed the Big East, the two former rivals will square off. Today’s battle will take place at the Battle 4 Atlantis, as the Orange knocked off Charlotte yesterday and the Huskies dispatched Michigan. To get ready for this battle, I’d suggest ready through the conversation @NoEscalators had with himself last night.

THIS ONE’S GOOD, TOO: No. 25 Texas A&M vs. No. 10 Gonzaga, 1:00 p.m.

The other semifinal in the Battle 4 Atlantis could end up being just as good, as the Aggies — who might be the second best team in the SEC — square off with a Gonzaga team that has one of the best front lines in the country. This will be a good test to figure out just how good both of these teams are.


1. No. 20 Wichita State vs. USC, 2:00 p.m.: The Shockers will be without Fred VanVleet for this event. It will also be a chance for us to gauge just how good this 4-0 USC team is.

2. No. 23 Xavier vs. Alabama, 12:00 p.m: The Musketeers should have no problems dispatching Alabama.

3. No. 8 Villanova vs. Stanford, 4:30 p.m.: The Wildcats are, once again, as good as any team in the country. Josh Hart might be the nation’s most underrated star.

4. No. 14 Cal vs. San Diego State, 12:00 a.m.: Tyrone Wallace and company have been awesome this season. They get their first real test of the season tonight.

5. Providence vs. Evansville, 7:00 p.m.: Evansville is one of the nation’s best mid-majors, good enough to give the likes of Wichita State and Northern Iowa a fight in the Missouri Valley. And Providence? They got a kid named Kris Dunn. Heard of him?


  • No. 3 Michigan State vs. Boston College, 6:30 p.m.
  • No. 11 Arizona vs. Santa Clara, 11:30 p.m.
  • No. 17 Notre Dame vs. Monmouth, 6:30 p.m.