A breakdown of every college player at adidas Nations

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LONG BEACH, California — Since adidas Nations featured so many quality college basketball players, the CBT staff has received a lot of questions about how certain guys played that haven’t received a lot of publicity from the event. So Raphielle Johnson and Scott Phillips decided to give quick breakdowns of each of the college players in attendance last week.

Click here for CBT’s coverage from adidas Nations

Bryce Alford, UCLA: Thrived in catch-and-shoot situations but struggled as a point guard against good competition. (SP)

BeeJay Anya, N.C. State: Having lost nearly 60 pounds since the start of his freshman year, Anya was far more active on both ends of the floor. (RJ)

Jabari Bird, Cal:  The sophomore got stronger as a scorer as the week went and played hard at both ends of the floor. (SP)

Jonah Bolden, UCLA: Bolden had his moments on both ends of the floor, but the level of consistency will need to improve. (RJ)

Perry Ellis, Kansas: Tried to showcase his perimeter ability too much but when he operated extended elbow and in Ellis was tough to stop. (SP)

AJ English, Iona: English played well, knocking down shots and playing solid defense throughout the weekend. (RJ)

Shaq Goodwin, Memphis: One of the more disappointing players in attendance as Goodwin showed bad hands and not enough weight and strength to stop bigger post players. (SP)

Josh Gray, LSU: Gray had some issues finishing in traffic, but his ability to break down defenses off the dribble was on display and that will help LSU’s big men this season. (RJ)

Montrezl Harrell, Louisville: The jumper wasn’t falling but the motor kept running for Harrell, as he showed an improved dribble-drive game from the elbow. (SP)

Zak Irvin, MichiganIrvin struggled to knock down catch-and-shoot looks, and there were also issues when it came to creating his own looks. (RJ)

Stanley Johnson, Arizona: The freshman ran through a bevy of tough pro and college wings and handled himself well because of his advanced skill level and college-ready frame. (SP)

Chris Jones, Louisville: Jones did a good job of getting his teammates involved, and he was also aggressive on the defensive end of the floor. (RJ)

Frank Kaminsky, Wisconsin: Kaminsky tried too hard to showcase his pick-and-pop ability for NBA scouts and wasn’t hitting shots while also neglecting his post game. (SP)

Shawn Long, Louisiana: Long struggled mightily with the athleticism of the big men he was asked to compete against. (RJ)

Kevon Looney, UCLA:  The only college counselor who didn’t participate in the three-day event due to injury. (SP)

Jordan Mathews, Cal: As with college teammate Jabari Bird, got better as the week went along and finally started to knock in some perimeter jumpers. (SP)

E.C. Matthews, Rhode Island: Matthews is still a work in progress when it comes to running the point, but he played well on both ends of the floor all weekend long. (RJ)

Jordan Mickey, LSU: While he had a quiet weekend offensively, Mickey did a good job on the boards and also as a weak-side defender. (RJ)

Austin Nichols, Memphis: Nichols is skilled as a pick-and-pop guy and showed more willingness to play against physicality, but he’s still largely a non-factor against tough interior presences unless he uses his face-up game. (SP)

Landry Nnoko, Clemson: Nnoko had a tough week in Long Beach, struggling on both ends of the floor. (RJ)

Kelly Oubre, Kansas: Only played for the last day of camp, but the smooth, lefty freshman had a great outing with Stanley Johnson guarding him (6-for-7 from 3PT) and appeared very confident on the offensive end. (SP)

Tony Parker, UCLA: One of the revelations of the weekend, Parker scored well around the basket and proved to be difficult for opponents to keep off the offensive glass. (RJ)

Terran Petteway, Nebraska:  Outstanding week for one of the Big Ten’s best players as he scored aggressively from multiple levels and defended hard on the perimeter. (SP)

Norman Powell, UCLA: Powell was the best performer at the camp, doing a very good job of finding looks offensively and keeping his man in check on the other end. (RJ)

Terry Rozier, Louisville: Looked like one of the best prospects in attendance at times but was prone to over-penetrating and getting himself into tough spots. (SP)

Shavon Shields, Nebraska: Shields got better as the weekend progressed, doing a better job of knocking down open looks and also passing the basketball. (RJ)

Kaleb Tarczewski, Arizona: Just an average camp for the junior big man as he walled up well on the defensive end but wasn’t much of a factor on the offensive end. (SP)

Brad Waldow, Saint Mary’s: Waldow played hard but there were multiple occasions in which he struggled with the athleticism on the court. (RJ)

Derrick Walton, Michigan: Walton generally played good overall floor games and operated well in the pick-and-roll, but his shot went in-and-out for much of the week. (SP)

Sweet 16 betting lines, point spreads, over-unders

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Here is the full TV schedule, with spreads, over-unders and betting lines, for every game for final day of the Sweet 16 of the NCAA tournament.

Odds via VegasInsider.com



  • 7:07 p.m.: No. 11 Loyola-Chicago vs. No. 7 Nevada (-2.5), CBS (143.5)
  • 9:37 p.m.: No. 9 Kansas State vs. No. 5 Kentucky (-5.5), CBS (138.5)


  • 7:37 p.m.: No. 7 Texas A&M vs. No. 3 Michigan (-3), TBS (134)
  • 10:07 p.m.: No. 9 Florida State vs. No. 4 Gonzaga (-5.5), TBS (154.5)



  • 7:07 p.m.: No. 5 Clemson vs. No. 1 Kansas (-4), CBS (143)
  • 9:37: No. 11 Syracuse vs. No. 2 Duke (-11.5), CBS (133.5)


  • 7:27 p.m.: No. 5 West Virginia vs. No. 1 Villanova, TBS
  • 9:57 p.m.: No. 3 Texas Tech vs. No. 2 Purdue (-1.5), TBS (137.5)

The 2018 NCAA tournament bracket looks wide open after a wild opening weekend

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The wild opening weekend of the 2018 NCAA tournament is finally in the books.

The bracket officially turns its attention to the Sweet 16 and Elite Eight this week as teams are trying to punch tickets to San Antonio during an especially wide-open year.

Major upsets, double-digit seeds advancing into the Sweet 16 and the loss of all four top seeds in the South Regional means there’s still plenty of action to watch over the next several weeks.

Here’s how the updated bracket looks after the first weekend of March Madness.

Sunday’s NCAA Tournament Recap: Four top three seeds fall

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Caleb Martin was, once again, a monster for Nevada on Sunday.

He finished with 25 points. He handed out seven assists. He put the No. 7-seed Wolf Pack on his back and carried them back from a 22-point deficit in the final 12 minutes of a game that looked like it was lost.

It was impressive.

But he’s not our player of the day. His teammate Josh Hall is. Because he’s the one that grabbed this offensive rebound and scored this put back and sent Nevada into the second weekend of the NCAA tournament.

That lead was Nevada’s first lead of the game.


  • JEVON CARTER, West Virginia: 28 points. Five steals. Five assists. Four boards. Eight turnovers for Marshall’s Jon Elmore. Jevon Carter was terrific this weekend.
  • T.J. STARKS, Texas A&M: While Tyler Davis and Big Bob Williams combined for 26 points and 22 boards, it was Starks that was the star for the Aggies on Sunday, finishing with 21 points and five assists in a blowout win over UNC.


No. 9-seed Florida State erased a 12-point deficit in the final 10 minutes to send No. 1-seed Xavier back to the Queen City. Both Xavier and Cincinnati blew late leads on Sunday.

It was not a pretty game, but No. 11-seed Syracuse knocked off No. 3-seed Michigan State in a game where the Spartans completely forgot how to make a jump shot.


Playing without their starting center, who is recovering from a broken elbow, Purdue’s Dakota Mathias buried this shot to send in-state rival Butler home:


Michigan State shot 8-for-38 from three on Sunday afternoon, which was the major reason that the Spartans found a way to lose to Syracuse in the second round.

But one of the eight threes that they did hit was this one:


Auburn never stood a chance. No. 5-seed Clemson led by 41 points at one points as they sent Bruce Pearl’s boys packing.

The dream died. No. 16 UMBC lost to No. 9 Kansas State, ending their “run” in the NCAA tournament at two games.

VIDEO: Roy Williams reflects on recent run: ‘Those kids on the court were my salvation’

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North Carolina head coach Roy Williams took a moment to reflect on a special three-year run after the Tar Heels were eliminated from the 2018 NCAA Tournament with a blowout loss to No. 7 seed Texas A&M on Sunday.

After back-to-back national title game appearances and a championship win last season, Williams grew quite fond of seniors like Joel Berry II and Theo Pinson. Williams also mentioned some of the tumultuous circumstances surrounding the program from the past few years as he maintained that his players helped him through a difficult stretch in his life.

Speaking to reporters at the postgame press conference, Williams tried to subdue the emotion in his voice as he talked about this Tar Heels team.

2018 NCAA Tournament: Sweet 16 betting odds and national title futures

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With four more top threes falling out of the NCAA tournament on Sunday, here are the updated national title futures and betting odds in the NCAA tournament.

Odds via VegasInsider.com

Villanova: 4/1
Duke: 6/1
Michigan: 8/1
Kentucky: 8/1
Kansas: 10/1
Gonzaga: 12/1
Purdue: 15/1
West Virginia: 22/1
Texas Tech: 25/1
Nevada: 100/1
Texas A&M: 100/1
Loyola Chicago: 100/1
Clemson: 125/1
Kansas State: 125/1
Syracuse: 125/1
Florida State: 150/1