What would Team USA look like if it only used college players?

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By now, everyone has heard about — if not seenthe brutal injury that Indiana Pacers star Paul George suffered in a Team USA scrimmage that was played to help Mike Krzyzewski figure out who will be on the squad that will play in the Basketball World Cup later this month.

One of the major talking points after that injury was whether or not professionals should be allowed to play in major international basketball competitions, or if we should send our nation’s best collegiate players overseas to participate.

That got us to thinking: If collegiate players were to make up our national team, what would that team look like? Three notes: Karl Towns plays with the Dominican team so he was not considered; Buddy Hield is Bahamian so he was eliminated as well; and Emmanuel Mudiay’s eligibility for our team was erased when he decided against playing college basketball. Otherwise, he would have likely been our starting point guard.

Here is the roster that we came up with:

G Marcus Paige, North Carolina: Paige is a lock to make this team — he might be the NCAA Preseason Player of the Year — but I do have my reservations when it comes Paige playing as a full-time point guard. He’s a scorer at heart. But it’s impossible to ignore what Paige did late last season, as he would run UNC’s offense until the moment they needed him to take the game over. Few can score like Paige can when he gets into a rhythm.

G Caris LeVert, Michigan: To think that LeVert is even in a position to be considered for this spot is nuts given where he came from, but he’s earned it. LeVert is a 6-foot-6 guard that can hit threes and is capable of creating in ball-screen situations. He’s not as complete of a player as Ron Baker is, but he’s a better scorer and individual creator.

F Stanley Johnson, Arizona: Johnson is just such a complete player. He can defend anywhere on the floor, he can run an offense if he needs to, he can hit a three and score in the post, he’ll rebound the ball. Johnson may be our small forward in this situation, and he’s may only be a freshman, but he’s strong enough and physical enough to hold his own against the pros at his position.

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F Sam Dekker, Wisconsin: We decided to go a bit smaller with our starting lineup for a couple reasons. On the one hand, Johnson is physical enough that he can help make up for some of Dekker’s deficiencies. But Dekker has also grown this summer, and the now-6-foot-9 forward can play the kind of stretch four role you see in European hoops. What he lacks in post strength he can make up for by creating a mismatch on the offensive end.

C Jahlil Okafor, Duke: Okafor is probably the best low post scorer in college basketball, and he’s not even in college basketball yet. He’s also got the size and strength to help the USA matchup with the massive Spanish front line that includes both Gasol brothers. Given that we will be using Dekker as a stretch four, Okafor gets the initial start over Kaminsky as he is the more physically imposing presence in the paint.

BENCH

  • Fred Van Vleet, Wichita State: I’m not sure there is a better point guard in the country than Van Vleet. He’s a calming presence and a leader that doesn’t get rattled. He’d likely push for a starting spot if this was the real world.
  • Ron Baker, Wichita State: We had a long debate over whether to include Baker or Chasson Randle and I made the decision to go with Baker. He can shoot the three and he can play both guard positions, but more importantly, he’s 6-foot-4 and can defend either guard position.
  • R.J. Hunter, Georgia State: We wanted to make sure that we had a sharpshooter somewhere on our roster, and I’m not sure there is a better pure shooter in the country than Hunter.
  • Georges Niang, Iowa State: Niang is a matchup nightmare given his ability to handle the ball and score in the high-post and mid-post. He’s the perfect four-man for the European game.
  • Perry Ellis, Kansas: I’m not sure just how much playing time Ellis would get in this scenario. He’s not as big as Okafor or Kaminsky, he’s not as versatile offensively as Niang, he’s not the rebounder or defender Harrell is. But Ellis can flat out play, and that was enough for him to make the cut.
  • Montrezl Harrell, Louisville: We needed an overpowering athlete on the roster and we decided to go with Harrell over Cliff Alexander. Harrell just plays so damn hard, and he’s added a better post and face-up game than he gets credit for.
  • Frank Kaminsky, Wisconsin: I’ve wondered just how much of Kaminsky’s success is a result of his actual ability and how much of it is a product of Bo Ryan’s ability to get the most out of his big men. The answer is irrelevant, however, as Kaminsky is a good fit as a big man in Europe. He can shoot, he can put the ball on the floor, and he’s got some back to the basket moves. He may end up beating Okafor out for a starting spot, but Kaminsky will be a major factor for this team.

Clemson basketball returns home after Barcelona van attack

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CLEMSON, S.C. (AP) — Clemson’s basketball team arrived back on campus, a day after a deadly van attack in Barcelona that occurred just outside their hotel.

The Tigers were preparing to play their fourth and final game of a summer tour of Spain when a van drove up on a sidewalk and crashed into scores of people in Las Ramblas promenade, killing 13. Clemson canceled the final game and flew back home as scheduled Friday.

Teams from Arizona and Oregon State were also staying at the hotel. A fourth team, Tulane, was in Barcelona at a different hotel. All of the schools said their parties were unharmed.

Clemson coach Brad Brownell tweeted Friday the team had landed in Atlanta and was “excited to be back in this great country.”

Tulane’s new court design brings back ‘Angry Wave’

(Photo courtesy of Tulane Athletics' Twitter account)
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Tulane’s court design is a throwback.

On Friday night, the school revealed the new look inside Devlin Fieldhouse, with the old “Angry Wave’ logo taking its place at center court.

A little over a year ago, Tulane University announced that the old ‘Angry Wave’ logo would be reincorporated into the athletics department as a secondary logo.

Over half a century ago, the “Angry Wave” was born and became one of the most visible marks of Tulane Athletics.  Together for the first time with the “T-Wave” the Green Wave now boasts one of the most unique sets of logos in collegiate athletics.

The Green Wave finished the 2016-17 season with a 6-25 (3-15 AAC) record. The program is currently on a foreign tour in Barcelona.

Five-star big man names final two schools

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There are only two schools in contention for the services of five-star big man Nazreon Reid.

On Friday night, the 6-foot-10 New Jersey native named Arizona and LSU as the two finalists. Before the start of the July live evaluation period, Reid had trimmed his list to seven programs. Kansas, Kentucky, Louisville, Seton Hall, and UCLA did not make the latest cut.

The Roselle Catholic High School center has ties to commits from both programs. Jahvon Quinerly, who picked Arizona over Villanova earlier this month, played with Reid, winning championships in 2015 and 2016 with Sports U in the Under Armour Association. According to Andrew Lopez of NOLA.com, Reid has developed a friendship with LSU pledge Javonte Smart through USA basketball and the grassroots circuit.

Reid’s commitment will bolster an already star-studded recruiting class for Sean Miller, as Quinerly is accompanied by five-star recruit Shareef O’Neal and four-star guard Brandon Williams. With Dusan Ristic exhausting his eligibility and DeAndre Ayton destined to be a top-10 pick in next summer’s NBA Draft, Reid would play a key role down low for the Wildcats during the 2018-19 season.

For LSU, this would add additional momentum for new head coach Will Wade. Since taking over the program in March, Wade has landed commitments from Smart and Tremont Waters.

Reid is listed as No. 13 overall player in the Class of 2018, according to Rivals.

Duke recruit Bagley hoping to play in the 2017-18 season

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Marvin Bagley III, widely considered the top recruit in the class of 2018, reclassified this week and could be eligible to play for Duke in the upcoming season.

His decision immediately thrusts the Blue Devils toward the front of the national-title conversation for the 2017-18 season.

But what exactly does it mean to reclassify and how does the process work?

According to the NCAA, all incoming student-athletes must complete 16 core courses from a list that includes English, math, natural or physical science, social science, foreign language, comparative religion or philosophy. Classes such as physical education, health and music do not count as core courses, nor do remedial classes or classes completed through credit-by-exam.

The student-athlete must also show proof of graduation from high school and have an ACT/SAT test score that corresponds to his or her core course GPA on a sliding scale; the higher the GPA, the lower the standardized test score needs to be.

The NCAA eligibility center’s amateurism team then determines whether to certify a student-athlete. The process and requirements are the same for every sport.

Bagley is scheduled to graduate from Southern California’s Sierra Canyon High School later this month, completing his course work a year ahead of schedule. His transcripts may be a little more complicated because he attended three different high schools and the NCAA will review his final transcript following his graduation to determine if he is eligible to play Division I basketball.

Bagley’s move is not unprecedented.

Through the years, five-star prospects who want to get a jump on their college careers — and potentially professional careers — have gone through the same process, though usually not right before the fall semester begins as Bagley did.

Mike Gminski is considered the leave-high-school-early originator, graduating a year early so he could play at Duke in 1976. He went on to become an All-American and played 17 NBA seasons.

In recent years, Kansas’ Andrew Wiggins, North Carolina State’s Dennis Smith Jr., Duke’s Derryck Thornton and Kentucky’s Karl-Anthony Towns were among the student-athletes who graduated early to play college basketball sooner. Kentucky’s Hamidou Diallo graduated a semester early and joined the Wildcats in January last season, but did not play. He declared for the NBA draft before deciding to return to Lexington.

Jontay Porter reclassified this year so he could play a year early with his brother, top recruit Michael, at Missouri. Canadian guard R.J. Barrett, considered the top recruit in 2019, has reclassified so he can graduate in 2018.

“With AAU and year-round competition basically, a lot of the players are ready for college-level play at an earlier age,” Gminski told WRAL in Raleigh, North Carolina, in 2015. “And most of these guys have been around a lot. They do a lot of traveling. They tend to mature pretty fast.”

Early graduation in football became popular in the early 2000s, though they typically only do it a semester early to enroll in college for the spring semester and participate in spring practices.

Baseball player Bryce Harper left his Las Vegas high school after his sophomore season and earned his GED so he could start playing professional baseball sooner. He played one season for the College of Southern Nevada and was taken with the No. 1 overall pick in the 2010 MLB draft by the Washington Nationals.

An opposite trend has started playing out in recent years, with parents holding their kids back a year so they can become bigger, stronger and more polished — some as early as middle school. Many top-tier recruits hold off going to college for a year, instead playing for elite prep schools after graduation for more seasoning and exposure.

Bagley opted for the get-to-college-early route, changing the landscape in college basketball in the process

Did Nike plagiarize JellyFam, Minnesota freshman Isaiah Washington to sell kid shoes?

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The JellyFam movement started as nothing more than a way for a little New York City point guard to add some flair to his game, a way to stunt on an opponent when you can’t dunk on that opponent, and has grown into something no one, not even Isaiah Washington, could have imagined.

Washington is that little point guard, and a few years ago, he and a couple of his hooping buddies coined the jelly, which, at its root, is essentially nothing more than a finger roll. Where the magic happens is when that finger comes after weaving around an opponent or finishing the layup despite the presence of a shot-blocker at the rim, with a sprinkle of NYC Point God showmanship. Think Kyrie Irving’s layup package if they happened at Rucker Park with an And1 Mixtape crew filming the game:

What JellyFam has turned into is a full-blown, grassroots movement powered by social media.

And while Washington is the face of the movement, it’s not just him. A half-dozen other talented New York hoopers are members of JellyFam, but Washington is the star. He’s a celebrity on the city’s hoops scene, drawing massive crowds wherever he goes and garnering more than 335,000 followers on Instagram despite having just 27 posts on the site. It’s not as if Washington is a sure-fire NBA All-Star, either. He’s a 6-foot-1, 160 pound point guard that doesn’t crack the top 50 on any of the major recruiting services and is headed to Minnesota to play his college ball.

His popularity is tied directly to the movement that he created.

It’s a shame, however, that he cannot profit off of it, not if he wants to remain an amateur that is eligible to play college basketball.

That doesn’t stop corporations from profiting off of what he has created.

Today, Nike released a new colorway for the kid size PG1s, Paul George’s signature shoe, that has been dubbed the ‘JellyFam PG1’. It’s being sold for $90 on their website right now. This is what it looks like:

What you’ll notice, in addition to purple and turquoise colors that are a staple in the JellyFam gear that Washington wears, is the straps. On the right foot, it says “score in bunches”. On the left foot, you’ll see a design that looks like basketballs on a grapevine … or the grape emoji, with basketballs instead of grapes.

Washington and the rest of the members of JellyFam have adopted the grape emoji as their own when posting on social media.

According to a Nike spokesperson, these shoes were “inspired by Paul George’s love for fresh grapes.”

What Nike is doing here is wrong.

They are trying to capitalize on a movement created by athletes that are not allowed to monetize something they built simply because of the NCAA’s amateurism rules. They are stealing the work created by these young men simply because they can. At worst, this is plagiarism.

Washington did not respond to messages from NBC Sports, but on Friday morning he tweeted, “It’s crazy bro they know I can’t so they just take advantage.” That tweet has since been deleted.

If you read this space, you know my feelings on the NCAA and amateurism. It’s wrong and it needs to be changed, but that’s another column for another day that’s been written thousands of times.

This column is much simpler: An international, multibillion-dollar company like Nike is already profiting off of the unpaid labor of amateur athletes.

Stealing their art, their work, their movement to try and sell sneakers to kids for $90 is despicable.

And I’m not sure there’s anything else to add.