Marcus Paige (Getty Images)

What would Team USA look like if it only used college players?

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By now, everyone has heard about — if not seenthe brutal injury that Indiana Pacers star Paul George suffered in a Team USA scrimmage that was played to help Mike Krzyzewski figure out who will be on the squad that will play in the Basketball World Cup later this month.

One of the major talking points after that injury was whether or not professionals should be allowed to play in major international basketball competitions, or if we should send our nation’s best collegiate players overseas to participate.

That got us to thinking: If collegiate players were to make up our national team, what would that team look like? Three notes: Karl Towns plays with the Dominican team so he was not considered; Buddy Hield is Bahamian so he was eliminated as well; and Emmanuel Mudiay’s eligibility for our team was erased when he decided against playing college basketball. Otherwise, he would have likely been our starting point guard.

Here is the roster that we came up with:

G Marcus Paige, North Carolina: Paige is a lock to make this team — he might be the NCAA Preseason Player of the Year — but I do have my reservations when it comes Paige playing as a full-time point guard. He’s a scorer at heart. But it’s impossible to ignore what Paige did late last season, as he would run UNC’s offense until the moment they needed him to take the game over. Few can score like Paige can when he gets into a rhythm.

G Caris LeVert, Michigan: To think that LeVert is even in a position to be considered for this spot is nuts given where he came from, but he’s earned it. LeVert is a 6-foot-6 guard that can hit threes and is capable of creating in ball-screen situations. He’s not as complete of a player as Ron Baker is, but he’s a better scorer and individual creator.

F Stanley Johnson, Arizona: Johnson is just such a complete player. He can defend anywhere on the floor, he can run an offense if he needs to, he can hit a three and score in the post, he’ll rebound the ball. Johnson may be our small forward in this situation, and he’s may only be a freshman, but he’s strong enough and physical enough to hold his own against the pros at his position.

source: Getty Images
Getty Images

F Sam Dekker, Wisconsin: We decided to go a bit smaller with our starting lineup for a couple reasons. On the one hand, Johnson is physical enough that he can help make up for some of Dekker’s deficiencies. But Dekker has also grown this summer, and the now-6-foot-9 forward can play the kind of stretch four role you see in European hoops. What he lacks in post strength he can make up for by creating a mismatch on the offensive end.

C Jahlil Okafor, Duke: Okafor is probably the best low post scorer in college basketball, and he’s not even in college basketball yet. He’s also got the size and strength to help the USA matchup with the massive Spanish front line that includes both Gasol brothers. Given that we will be using Dekker as a stretch four, Okafor gets the initial start over Kaminsky as he is the more physically imposing presence in the paint.


  • Fred Van Vleet, Wichita State: I’m not sure there is a better point guard in the country than Van Vleet. He’s a calming presence and a leader that doesn’t get rattled. He’d likely push for a starting spot if this was the real world.
  • Ron Baker, Wichita State: We had a long debate over whether to include Baker or Chasson Randle and I made the decision to go with Baker. He can shoot the three and he can play both guard positions, but more importantly, he’s 6-foot-4 and can defend either guard position.
  • R.J. Hunter, Georgia State: We wanted to make sure that we had a sharpshooter somewhere on our roster, and I’m not sure there is a better pure shooter in the country than Hunter.
  • Georges Niang, Iowa State: Niang is a matchup nightmare given his ability to handle the ball and score in the high-post and mid-post. He’s the perfect four-man for the European game.
  • Perry Ellis, Kansas: I’m not sure just how much playing time Ellis would get in this scenario. He’s not as big as Okafor or Kaminsky, he’s not as versatile offensively as Niang, he’s not the rebounder or defender Harrell is. But Ellis can flat out play, and that was enough for him to make the cut.
  • Montrezl Harrell, Louisville: We needed an overpowering athlete on the roster and we decided to go with Harrell over Cliff Alexander. Harrell just plays so damn hard, and he’s added a better post and face-up game than he gets credit for.
  • Frank Kaminsky, Wisconsin: I’ve wondered just how much of Kaminsky’s success is a result of his actual ability and how much of it is a product of Bo Ryan’s ability to get the most out of his big men. The answer is irrelevant, however, as Kaminsky is a good fit as a big man in Europe. He can shoot, he can put the ball on the floor, and he’s got some back to the basket moves. He may end up beating Okafor out for a starting spot, but Kaminsky will be a major factor for this team.

SMU won’t appeal tournament ban, Brown suspension

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Last month the NCAA announced that due to rules violations found in their investigation of the SMU men’s basketball program, the team would be banned from postseason play in 2015-16 and head coach Larry Brown would be suspended for the first nine games of the 2015-16 season. With a team led by seniors Nic Moore and Markus Kennedy and just one player (Keith Frazier) being the subject of the investigation, it was assumed that SMU would at the very least appeal the postseason ban.

Friday, the school announced that while it will appeal some of the penalties handed down by the NCAA to the men’s basketball and men’s golf programs they will not appeal the postseason ban or Brown’s suspension.

“After careful consideration, however, we will not appeal the NCAA post-season ban on men’s basketball or partial season suspension of Head Men’s Basketball Coach Larry Brown,” SMU president R. Gerald Turner stated in the release. “Although we regret the severe impact on our student-athletes, the simple fact is that the NCAA penalty structure mandates at minimum a one-year post-season ban for the level of misconduct that occurred, in our case, when a former staff member completed an online high school course for a prospective student-athlete, committing academic misconduct.

“In addition, should we appeal this matter, the lengthy process and uncertainty during this period could harm many aspects of the program. Coach Brown and his staff also agree that it is in the best interests of the program to accept these sanctions and move forward.”

Among the penalties the school will appeal (with regards to the basketball program) are the “duration of scholarship losses” and how long the recruiting restrictions placed on the program will last, and the vacating of games Frazier played in during the 2013-14 season.

This a tough turn of events for players who had nothing to do with the violations, as they see their opportunity to return to the NCAA tournament taken away. As a result of the school’s decision, SMU’s season will end March 9 following their regular season finale against Cincinnati.

Kevin Marfo commits to George Washington

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Kevin Marfo committed to George Washington on Friday evening, announcing his decision on Twitter.

“I am grateful and appreciative to all the schools that recruited me. But I will be spending the next four years at George Washington University,” he tweeted.

This caps a successful week for Mike Lonergan on the recruiting trail. On Tuesday, GW landed a commitment from Darnell Rogers, a 5-foot-3 point guard. He is the son of former GW guard Shawnta Rogers, the 1999 Atlantic 10 Player of the Year. GW ends the week by adding a tenacious rebounder to a front court that graduates top rebounder Kevin Larsen after this season. Rogers and Marfo join power forward Collin Smith in the Class of 2016. Seton Hall transfer Jaren Sina will also be eligible in 2016-17.

He cut his list to 10 in August with Pittsburgh, Georgia Tech, Minnesota, Boston College, UMass, Saint Joseph’s, DePaul, Rhode Island and Providence all making the cut along wit the Colonials. He later trimmed the list to five finalists: BC, Providence, DePaul, GW and Rhode Island.

The Worcester Academy (Mass.) forward played for BABC this summer in the Nike EYBL, averaging 11.3 points and 8.8 rebounds per game.  The 6-foot-8 Marfo is listed as the No. 148 overall player in the Class of 2016 by Rivals.