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Skal Labissiere is considering Europe, but that doesn’t mean there’s a market for him

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The most recent topic of discussion in the college hoops world to make the rounds on the #hotsportstake bandwagon is that of Emmanuel Mudiay.

You surely know the story by now. The No. 2 prospect in the Class of 2014 and an athletic, 6-foot-5, season-altering lead guard, Mudiay was scheduled to play for SMU this season. But two weeks ago, he announced that he would be forgoing college, forced to head overseas because he either wanted to help support his family (the Mudiay party line) or he was too worried about his academic eligibility and his status as an amateur to risk a season in college (what everyone else believes to be true).

Mudiay eventually signed with the Guangdong Dragons in China.

His contract? It’s reportedly worth $1.2 million.

The talking point here is whether or not Mudiay will be a trendsetter, a trailblazer leading a new breed of elite recruit overseas where they will make a seven-figure salary for seven months before entering the NBA draft.

And it’s certainty a conversation worth having. As I mentioned when the news first broke, the reason that Mudiay — and Brandon Jennings before him — went overseas was because NCAA rules more than likely were going to forbid him from playing college basketball. When ineligibility and the mountains of negative publicity that come with it are staring you in the face, you take that million-dollar contract every single time. With initial eligibility standards increasing, and thus making it more likely that a recruit will be ruled ineligible, there’s a real chance that this could become a more common occurrence.

And that’s saying nothing of the possibility that Adam Silver implements a two-and-done rule for entering the draft. High school kids these days have grown up knowing nothing other than college basketball with the one and done rule. Having to spend an extra 12 months on campus and sans paycheck may not be the easiest sell.

All that brings me to the latest development in this story: On Thursday, Skal Labissiere — a five-star, Class of 2015 center being pursued by the likes of Kentucky, North Carolina, Memphis and Georgetown — told CBSSports.com on the record that following in Mudiay’s footsteps is a route he’s looking into.

“Overseas is an option,” Labissiere said, which is notable. There have been rumblings that a number of players in Labissiere’s class are looking into that option, but the native-Haitian is the first to acknowledge, on record, that the money that Mudiay got will be a factor in his decision-making process. “I don’t know yet for sure. We’ll see. But that is a lot of money.”

When giving a million-dollar contract to an 18 or 19 year old American player, one of the biggest concerns for a professional team in a different country is how that player will acclimate. Living abroad, dealing with the massive cultural changes that come with international travel, is not an easy thing for a high school grad to deal with.

Labissiere, in theory, would be able to adapt as well as anyone because he’s already made that change. Labissiere grew up in Haiti and left after he survived the devastating 2010 earthquake that killed as many as 300,000 of his countrymen. He’s lived in a different country with a different culture for the last four years, and, by all accounts, he’s thrived. He’s one of the sweetest, most gregarious kids in this class, polite when dealing with the media and perpetually grinning from ear to ear, and he’s been through more than I can imagine. Heading to Italy or China or wherever to play pro ball for a year shouldn’t be all that much of an issue for him.

But that’s assuming that someone wants him.

Because the point that hasn’t been made nearly enough when discussing the potential for American teenagers to spend their year in NBA purgatory abroad is that there simply isn’t all that much of a market for these guys abroad, particularly in Europe.

Let’s start with the obvious: When we’re talking about guys who can go pro overseas and make seven-figures, we’re talking about the elite of the elite. Andrew Wiggins, Jabari Parker, Jahlil Okafor, Mudiay. In a strong class, you’re looking at maybe five to seven guys who are worth consideration. In a weak class like 2015, you’re looking at just Ben Simmons, and I’m not convinced he’s good enough to garner that kind of a salary.

The bigger problem?

Teams in Europe do not want to sign an 18-year old kid for just one season. What do they get out of it? A prospect who’s not ready to contribute major minutes at the highest level of European basketball for one season before they head back stateside to play in the NBA? As good as Labissiere is now and as promising as he is as a prospect, the fact of the matter is that he gets pushed around by stronger guys at the high school level here. He would routinely be overpowered in the paint in a good European league. If the team cannot develop him, it’s not worth a million dollars to them.

“If you don’t want to sign a four or five year deal than you don’t get paid as an 18 or 19 year old,” one NBA scout told NBCSports.com. “European guys are looking and saying, ‘Would I rather be Mario Hezonja, stuck in Barcelona not playing and not able to get to the NBA, or would I rather be in the league like Alex Len?

“If you want to play in the NBA, which is what a lot of the Europeans and all of the Americans do, than signing a long-term deal with a big European club, which is the only way to get paid over there, is not a good option.”

It’s part of the reason that Mudiay was forced to head to China, a league that pays well, but A) demands major performances out of their American players, B) is quick to cut players that struggle, and C) will not be a productive step, and could be a hindrance, in his individual development.

A smart European team could start to flip American players for profit, signing them to $200,000-$300,000 contracts with $600,000 buyouts, the max an NBA team is allowed to pay.

In theory, that makes sense.

In practice, it doesn’t.

If we’re going to be honest here, we need to acknowledge that any incoming freshman talented enough to garner that kind of deal from a European team has the avenues to get paid just as much, if not more, while he’s in college, and I say that without a shred of sarcasm. Whether it be boosters paying to bring him to their school, agents paying to ensure that he will be a future client or shoes companies paying to keep him loyal, there are avenues for elite recruits to generate a substantial income. It may not be savory, but they are there.

Which brings me back to Skal Labissiere.

He may be looking at overseas as an option. He may be quite intrigued by the contract that was given to Mudiay. He may like the idea of skipping college and getting $1.2 million put into his bank account.

That doesn’t mean that there is anyone who would be willing to pay him that much for one season, and even if there is, it doesn’t guarantee that the quick payout will be better for his long-term development — and, thus, career-earnings — than going to college.

Assuming that he’ll be able to get his academics in order and that he hasn’t compromised his amateur status, Labissiere, as well as the other recruits thinking about following in the steps of Mudiay, may simply be better off going to college, playing on national television and collecting those Ricky Roe duffel bags.

It’s the American way.

Jayson Williams says Charles Oakley lent him $20K while at St. John’s

24 Jan 1999: Jayson Williams #55 and Sam Cassell #10 of the New Jersey Nets cheer on of the St John''s Red Storm during the game against the Duke Blue Devils at the Madison Square Garden in New York, New York. The Blue Devils defeated the Red Storm 92-88. Mandatory Credit: David Leeds  /Allsport
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Another Madison Square Garden tenant has been brought into the feud between Charles Oakley and Knicks owner James Dolan.

St. John’s.

How, exactly, do the Red Storm figure in? Well, the story comes courtesy of former St. John’s and NBA standout Jayson Williams, who spoke to Gio & Jones of CBS Sports Radio.

“So, how we did it at St. John’s was when you were in your senior year, and the guys who made it before you goes to the NBA, that guy would give you,” Williams said, according to CBS Sports, “let’s call it like a loan so you don’t have to go out and get an agent or put St. John’s in any trouble with the NCAA. So when my year was up and I was a senior, it was Mark Jackson. Now if anybody knows Mark Jackson, Mark is the greatest human being on Earth – but cheap as the day is long. That man is so frugal.”

As such, Jackson didn’t lend Williams any money, but his teammate on the 1989-90 Knicks, Oakley, did. More from Williams:

“He said, ‘Come here, man. Once you ask somebody once and they ain’t going to give it to you, you don’t beg. What you do is follow me home after.’ Went home and he gave me 20 (and said) ‘When you get drafted, I’m going to want 25 back.’”

And after that the two became fast friends, even if Oakley charged Williams “mafia rates” on return, Williams said. Williams has been one of many outspoken defenders of Oakley, who is in a very public dispute with Dolan after an ugly incident at MSG.

Williams averaged 14.6 points and 7.8 rebounds per game in his final season with St. John’s before being taken. in the first round of the 1990 draft.

Oakley was one of the few people that came to prison to visit Williams in prison after Williams was sentenced for fatally shooting a hired limo driver in 2002.

“Charles Oakley came to see me once every month like clockwork,” Williams said. “This is why people are so adamant about supporting Charles Oakley.”

 

Bubble Banter: California, TCU and Syracuse with critical games tonight

LAS VEGAS, NV - MARCH 10:  Ivan Rabb #1 of the California Golden Bears stands on the court during a quarterfinal game of the Pac-12 Basketball Tournament against the Oregon State Beavers at MGM Grand Garden Arena on March 10, 2016 in Las Vegas, Nevada. California won 76-68.  (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
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The latest NBC Sports bracketology can be found here. That is where the seeds you see listed below come from. 

This post will be updated throughout the night.

STILL TO PLAY

Vanderbilt at Tennessee (RPI: 50, KenPom: 42, first four out), 6:30 p.m.

Michigan (RPI: 52, KenPom: 27, No. 10 seed) at Rutgers, 6:30 p.m.

No. 10 Duke at Syracuse (RPI: 84, KenPom: 48, first four out), 7:00 p.m.

Pitt (RPI: 59, KenPom: , next four out) at Wake Forest (RPI: 40, KenPom: 31, next four out), 7:00 p.m.

TCU (RPI: 54, KenPom: 43, play-in game) at No. 3 Kansas, 7:00 p.m.

Southern Illinois at Illinois State (RPI: 36, KenPom: 50, No. 12 seed), 7:00 p.m.

Saint Louis at VCU (RPI: 26, KenPom: 41, No. 9 seed), 7:00 p.m.

Xavier at Seton Hall (RPI: 47, KenPom: 59, play-in game), 7:00 p.m.

Texas A&M at Arkansas (RPI: 33, KenPom: 51, No. 9 seed), 8:30 p.m.

No. 6 Oregon at Cal (RPI: 39, KenPom: 47, No. 10 seed), 9:00 p.m.

Oklahoma State at Kansas State (RPI: 51, KenPom: 28, No. 11 seed), 9:00 p.m.

Providence (RPI: 69, KenPom: 58, first four out) at No. 23 Creighton, 9:00 p.m.

Man arrested for selling fake Duke-UNC tickets

DURHAM, NC - FEBRUARY 09:  Justin Jackson #44 of the North Carolina Tar Heels throws the ball in against the Duke Blue Devils during their game at Cameron Indoor Stadium on February 9, 2017 in Durham, North Carolina.  (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)
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A man was arrested in Durham on Feb. 9th, the day of the Duke-North Carolina game at Cameron Indoor Stadium, for selling counterfeit tickets to the game, according to the Durham Herald-Sun.

The man, a 24-year old from Ft. Myers, Florida, named Andrew Frank Arvai, was busted in a sting that was set up by someone that had bought fake tickets from Arvai before.

From the Sun:

DPD spokesman Wil Glenn alleged that Arvai placed an ad on Craigslist for the tickets and set up a meeting with a ticket broker from stubhub.com at Northgate to sell the tickets to the Feb. 9 game.

Glenn said the broker had purchased tickets from Arvai in the past and the Feb. 9 transaction was a sting. The broker called mall security and alerted a police officer that he was going to meet the scalper, who he accused of selling phony tickets.

According to Durham jail records, he was charged with four counts of scalping tickets, four counts of counterfeiting a trademark and four counts of obtaining property by false pretenses.

Louisville-North Carolina, Duke-Syracuse preview features two matchups of Hall-of-Famers

CHARLOTTE, NC - MARCH 29:  (R-L) Head coach Roy Williams of the North Carolina Tar Heels smiles as he talks with head coach Rick Pitino of the Louisville Cardinals during the 2008 NCAA Men's East Regional Final at Bobcats Arena on March 29, 2008 in Charlotte, North Carolina.  (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
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No. 7 Louisville at No. 8 North Carolina, 9:00 p.m. (ESPN)

There are six active Hall of Fame head coaches in the collegiate ranks today. Four of them are coaching tonight. Two of them will be squaring off with each other in the Dean Dome in what promises to be a terrific games with a ton on the line.

The Tar Heels are currently sitting all alone in first place in the ACC, a game ahead of Duke and Louisville. A win on Wednesday would put UNC in a position where it seems very unlikely that they’ll finish behind Louisville and, barring upset losses at either Virginia or Pitt, given them a chance to lock up the outright ACC regular season title when they host Duke in the season finale. An ACC regular season title might be enough for the Tar Heels to lock up the No. 1 seed in the South. That would be a nice present, even if the games aren’t going to be played in state.

The game itself should be fascinating. Rick Pitino is one of the greatest defensive coaches to ever live, as his team’s have been in the top five of KenPom’s defensive efficiency rankings each of the last seven seasons and nine of the last ten years. The question with his group is going to be whether or not they are able to score enough points to keep pace with the Tar Heels, who feature ACC Player of the Year favorite Justin Jackson alongside a big, veteran front line and a point guard in Joel Berry II who is the engine of that fast break.

  • PREDICTION: UNC’s ability to get to the offensive glass combined with the presence of Jackson, who has been unstoppable in ACC play, is enough to get the Tar Heels to cover (-5.5)
SYRACUSE, NY - FEBRUARY 14: Head coach Jim Boeheim of the Syracuse Orange shakes the hand of Head coach Mike Krzyzewski of the Duke Blue Devils after the game on February 14, 2015 at The Carrier Dome in Syracuse, New York. Duke defeats Syracuse 80-72. (Photo by Brett Carlsen/Getty Images)
SYRACUSE, NY – FEBRUARY 14: Head coach Jim Boeheim of the Syracuse Orange shakes the hand of Head coach Mike Krzyzewski of the Duke Blue Devils after the game on February 14, 2015 at The Carrier Dome in Syracuse, New York. Duke defeats Syracuse 80-72. (Photo by Brett Carlsen/Getty Images)

Four more games to watch

  • No. 10 Duke at Syracuse, 7:00 p.m. (ESPN): The other two Hall of Fame coaches in action tonight square off in the Carrier Dome in front of what could end up being as many as 30,000 Syracuse fans. It’s a must-win for the Orange, who are still in the NCAA tournament picture despite a 16-12 record and a trio of horrid losses. PREDICTION: I think Syracuse wins outright, so I’m on the Orange (+4)
  • Minnesota at No. 24 Maryland, 8:30 p.m. (BTN): Maryland’s bid for the Big Ten regular season title isn’t completely shot, but the Terps are a game behind both Wisconsin and Purdue. They need this win, but the Gophers have proven to be tough, better than we’ve expected. PREDICTION: Maryland (-4.5)
  • No. 22 Butler at No. 2 Villanova, 9:00 p.m. (FS1): It seems like Butler hasn’t been right for weeks, and tonight they make the trek to Philadelphia to face off with the Wildcats. They play in The Pavilion, and no one on this Villanova team has ever lost a game in that building. PREDICTION: Villanova (-10)
  • No. 6 Oregon at California, 9:00 p.m. (ESPN2): This is a game that Cal desperately needs, not because the Bears are in real danger of missing the NCAA tournament but because they need an elite on their profile to avoid getting stuck somewhere in that 8-9 game. PREDICTION: Oregon (-4)

VIDEO: Frank Martin hides in shirt to duck politics question, then delivers eloquent answer

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South Carolina head coach Frank Martin was asked at a Monday media session how he would feel if, after his team won a national title, one or more of his players decided against visiting the White House with the team.

Martin is the son of Cuban exiles and grew up in Miami. When the question was prefaced with, “Since it’s President’s Day I think I can ask this,” Martin hid in his shirt, and while his reaction was funny, his answer was actually pretty enlightening and typical Frank Martin.

(If you cannot watch the video, the text is below):

“I haven’t thought about it,” Martin said when his head finally emerged from within his shirt and after a good 15 seconds of contemplation. “Probably not. Probably not I haven’t agreed with every President that’s been in the White House in my lifetime. But I love this country and what our government stands for as a whole. I’ not going to judge our country based on who I like and don’t like. I think we do an injustice to young people when we make them think this country is run by one person.”

“I think it’s an injustice. Any time we take a stand against one person — we can do whatever we want to here, I’m not trying to tell people how to do things, you’re asking my my opinion and I’m sharing it with you — I think we do an injustice. The beautiful thing in this country is that we all have different voices and we can all express our voices and our views. I think I would be disappointed if any of our players chose not to attend. If they were adamant about it, I wouldn’t force them to go. I’m not going to put their scholarship on the line and make them do something that they feel that strongly about. But I would let them know as their coach, a guy that tries mentor them and try to educate and try to prevent that from happening. But at the end of the day, they’re human beings and they don’t live in a country where you’re forced to do what you don’t want to do.

“I’d be OK coaching somebody that would be against. I would just be disappointed in their unwillingness to understand that their country has moved forward. Contrary to what the media wants us to get us believe, we haven’t moved backwards, we’ve moved forward in the last 50 years. Since my family arrived in this country, this country has moved forward. Does it move forward at a great rate, great pace, is it perfect? No. But it’s moved forward.”

“For us to act like one person runs or controls the decision of this country is false. It’d be a disservice to what this country stands for, what we’re about and my love for the opportunity this country has given me for me to get selfish because of my personal views on one person and not be supportive of the thing as a whole.”