(Kelly Kline/Under Armour)

Seven Takeaways from the Under Armour Finals

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Kelly Kline/Under Armour

The second of July’s three live periods ended at 5:00 p.m. Sunday. We had writers traversing the southeast, going to and from the Under Armour Association Finals and Nike’s Peach Jam. Here are seven takeaways from Peach Jam:

MOREQuotables Part I | Part II | Part III | All content from the 2014 July Live Period

ATLANTA — Scott and I made a trip down to Atlanta to see the Under Armour Finals while we were in Augusta, Ga., for the Peach Jam. Here are our seven takeaways from the event:

1. Under Armour hit a homerun with The Finals: The Under Armour Association made a brilliant decision this year to hold their marquee event — the finals of their summer long series — in Atlanta during the same live period as Nike’s Peach Jam, which takes place two-and-a-half hours away in North Augusta, S.C. 17U play doesn’t begin at Peach Jam until Thursday, so UA held their showcase games on Wednesday night and Thursday morning. Since many of the media members and coaches heading to Peach Jam fly into Atlanta, they created a must-see tournament that was easily accessible for everyone Augusta-bound. The event itself, held at the Suwanee Sports Academy was well-run, but … (Rob Dauster)

RELATED: Peach Jam takeaways: ScottRob

2. The Under Armour Association needs a shot clock: Having covered events from adidas, Under Armour and Nike the first two weeks of the July live evaluation period, the one thing that is holding the Under Armour events back is the lack of a shot clock. While adidas and Nike offer shot clocks in their leagues — and in some cases, camps — Under Armour is still behind on the times. This led to some teams holding possession for long periods of time to break zones or to gain a final possession advantage during multiple-minute overtimes. It’s at times brutal to watch. And college coaches in attendance like to see how players respond to end of shot clock situations. It’s one thing for budget-strapped state federations to not have a shot clock in the high school setting, but a shoe company throwing significant money into its grassroots initiatives needs to have a shot clock. (Scott Phillips)

Kelly Kline/Under Armour

3. Josh Jackson needs to be more consistent to hold onto No. 1: There is no question that Detroit native Josh Jackson is a significant talent, but the 6-foot-6 Class of 2016 wing is taking too many bad shots and making too many poor decisions for a No. 1 player in a pretty talented class. Rivals has Jackson at No. 1 at the current moment, but guys like Jayson Tatum, Harry Giles, Thon Maker, Malik Monk and Dennis Smith, Jr. are all in contention to be in the top five. Jackson is probably the best combination of talent and athleticism for his position among that group, but he has to make better choices with the ball in his hands if he wants to be in the conversation for No. 1. For a guy that can get to the rim and make plays for others using his tremendous passing ability, Jackson hoists up way too many contested perimeter jumpers. (SP)

MORE: Josh Jackson outplays Jaylen Brown

4. Diamond Stone might have trouble against length in college: Diamond Stone is a consensus top-10 player in the Class of 2015, but the 6-foot-9 bruiser could have some trouble dealing with length on the interior in college. Although Stone is big enough, wide enough and skilled enough to do significant damage at the high school level, he’s had some issues dealing with tall big men with significant wingspans. In an opening-night showcase game against Atlanta Xpress, Stone was blocked at least five times by the combination of the Xpress’ Tim Rowe and Doral Moore. Now, Stone can counteract this a bit by stepping out and taking some jumpers — which he has the ability to do — but the Wisconsin native needs to figure out some more counter moves on the block to help out his game against longer opponents as well. Stone has the talent to do this, it will just be interesting to see how he develops in his senior season. (SP)

5. Donovan Mitchell is one of the biggest stock risers of July: After putting together an impressive performance in Philly for the Reebok Breakout Classic, Mitchell starred down in Atlanta for the UAA Finals. He’s a big, physical, athletic guard that can really rebound and pass the ball. He’s a bit turnover prone and he needs to improve the consistency of his perimeter stroke, but after missing last summer with a broken wrist, Mitchell has made a statement with his play this summer. He was planning on cutting down his list until the likes of Indiana and Louisville started offering him scholarships. (RD)

6. There are still some good guards left on the board: There aren’t many good guards for high-major programs in the 2015 class, but the Under Armour Association featured a few guards that can really play. Jawun Evans has had a really strong summer and he’s in the conversation among the best point guards in the class. At 5-foot-11, Evans may be undersized, but he can get a piece of the paint anytime he has the ball in his hands and he mixes in a lot of shots near the basket that keep defenders flat-footed. Illinois native Glynn Watson is another solid high-major guard option and the 5-foot-11 point guard has recently picked up scholarship offers from Maryland and West Virginia during the live period. Watson can be a tad turnover prone, but he’s smooth with the ball in his hands and can also make plays at times as a scorer. And Watson thrives in clutch situations. He has multiple buzzer beaters with the Wolves during this grassroots season. (SP)

7. If Jaylen Brown is hitting threes, watch out: I’ve seen Jaylen Brown play enough times now to know what to expect out of him. He’s a tough defender, he’s awesome in transition, he can get to the rim off the bounce and he plays that power wing role that has become more prevalent in recent years. When I watched him in Atlanta, however, Brown buried four catch-and-shoot threes from four different spots on the floor, which is significant because his perimeter stroke has always been the biggest concern in his game.

Wichita State’s 0-3 week makes chances for at-large bid small

Fred VanVleet
AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki

We’ve reached the nightmare scenario for Wichita State.

Having entered the season as the overwhelming favorite in the Missouri Valley, a top 15 team and a legitimate threat to reach a Final Four, after two weeks, the Shockers are in serious danger of missing out on the NCAA tournament altogether.

That’s not hyperbole, either.

Wichita State fell to 2-4 on the year after getting mollywhopped by Iowa in the 7th-place game of the Advocare Invitational. They ended up in the 7th-place game because they lost to USC and Alabama in the opening two rounds. The Hawkeyes look like the might be able to eke out an at-large berth if things fall the right way for them, but USC and Alabama are projected to finish at or near the bottom of their respective conferences. Even Iowa would do well to finish in the top half of the Big Ten.

Individually, none of those three losses are particularly terrible, and that’s before you factor in that all-american point guard Fred VanVleet sat out the trip to Orlando with a bad hamstring. They were also without back up point guard Landry Shamet in the tournament and it’s unknown when they’ll actually get Anton Grady back to full stretch. That matters to the NCAA tournament selection committee. They’ll factor it in when they determine where the Shockers will be seeded, or if they will even get an invite.

But throw in the loss at Tulsa from the first week of the season, and the Shockers are now 2-4 on the season.

And unlike the rest of the preseason top 25 — unlike the rest of the nation’s high-major programs — Wichita State won’t have a chance to load up on quality wins during league play. The Valley is better than we probably realized (more on that in a second), but it’s not like there are going to be a myriad of top 50 wins for the taking.

Look at Georgetown, for example. They Hoyas went 1-3 in the first week of the season, a stretch that included a home loss to Radford. But they also play in a conference where they’ll get home-and-homes against the likes of Villanova, Butler and Xavier.

The Shockers need to do their damage during the non-conference. They need to get the bulk of their resume put together before Valley play starts. Assuming they do win the rest of their non-league games, we’re not exactly looking at a daunting profile, either. The Shockers still have to visit Saint Louis and Seton Hall and host UNLV, Utah, Nevada and New Mexico State. UNLV and Utah should look like quality wins on Selection Sunday, but the rest of them?

Wichita State is putting themselves in a position where they may end up needing to win the Missouri Valley tournament just to get into the Big Dance, and the problem is that the Valley looks like it is really going to be tough this season. Northern Iowa notched a win over North Carolina already this year. Illinois State gave Maryland a fight and entered the season as a favorite to upset the Shockers. Evansville has two of the league’s five best players in D.J. Balentine and Egidijus Mockevicius.

They’re not waltzing through that conference by any stretch of the imagination.

That’s not exactly what VanVleet and Ron Baker had in mind when they decided to return to Wichita for one final season.

Carter leads No. 2 Maryland past Cleveland State, 80-63

Melo Trimble
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COLLEGE PARK, Md. (AP) Robert Carter had 17 points and eight rebounds to help No. 2 Maryland beat Cleveland State 80-63 on Saturday night.

Jared Nickens added 16 points, and freshman Diamond Stone had a season-high 15 points for Maryland (6-0), set for a showdown with No. 9 North Carolina in the ACC/Big Ten Challenge on Tuesday night.

Demonte Flannigan scored 11 of his 20 points in the first half, and Rob Edwards added 14 points for Cleveland State (2-4), which was 3 of 12 (25 percent) from 3-point range. Vinny Zollo went 5 of 7 from the field and had 11 points for the Vikings.

Maryland led by just four at the break and took control by increasing the pressure to open the second half. A dunk by Stone capped an 8-0 run and the Terrapins led 45-33 with 17:06 left.

From there, the Terps used their size and depth to wear down the Vikings, who could not get closer than nine points the rest of the way. Nickens and Jake Layman hit 3-pointers and Maryland opened a 64-49 lead with 7:43 remaining.

The 6-foot-7 Flannagan picked up his fourth foul with just under 10 minutes left, hampering the Vikings at both ends of the court. A putback by Nickens and a pair of free throws boosted Terrapins’ margin to 70-53 with 5:18 left and they were never threatened the rest of the way.

Maryland was 15 of 18 from the free-throw line and had a 27-22 rebounding edge.

Maryland could not shake Cleveland State in the opening half and a jumper by Kenny Carpenter gave the Vikings their first lead, 25-24, with 8:03 left. Nickens responded with three straight 3-pointers that helped the Terps take a 37-33 lead at halftime

Maryland shot 14 of 23 (60.9 percent) in the opening half.


Cleveland State: The Vikings also lost their only other matchup against the Terrapins, 95-84, on Dec. 5 1984. … Maryland was Cleveland State highest-ranked opponent since Nov. 26, 1999, when it lost to No. 1 Cincinnati, 90-56.

Maryland: The Terrapins won their 29th consecutive game at home against an unranked team. … Maryland extended its winning streak in November to 16 games, having not lost since Nov. 17, 2013, against Oregon State (90-83).


Cleveland State is at Toledo on Wednesday night.

Maryland plays at No. 9 North Carolina on Tuesday night in the ACC/Big Ten Challenge.