Kelly Kline/Under Armour

Skipping college makes Emmanuel Mudiay the most important player in 2014 class

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Kelly Kline/Under Armour

The rumors started swirling over the weekend before erupting on Monday morning in a torrent of sourced reports and statements, as Emmanuel Mudiay made it official that he will never play a second of basketball for SMU, the hometown school he signed with over Kentucky last season.

Mudiay’s brother Jean-Michael gave a statement to NBCSports saying that the decision was strictly financial, that the powerful, 6-foot-5 lead guard known as E-man was trying to help support his mother and the rest of his immediate family. Very few people in basketball circles actually believe that, as the general consensus seems to be that Mudiay made this decision to avoid becoming the next Josh Selby or Shabazz Muhammad, an elite recruit whose season is delayed and whose name is tarnished by eligibility issues.

But to be frank, whether Mudiay made this decision on his own or his hand was forced by the NCAA is neither here nor there, because the fact of the matter is that Mudiay has suddenly turned into an important and potentially influential case study.

Due to a couple of rule changes, the European route could end up becoming a popular one in the very near future.

Beginning in 2016, the NCAA will be implementing stricter initial eligibility standards that will make it more difficult for elite prospects with academic issues to be able to play as freshman. That’s not the only potential rule change that could affect whether or not an elite basketball prospect will end up on a campus. New NBA Commissioner Adam Silver is not-so-subtly pushing to implement a 20-year old age limit and a two-and-done rule.

Staring down the barrel of two seasons without a professional paycheck, and with the lack of motivation in the classroom for some of basketball’s most talented youngsters, moving to a different country for two years not only looks like a financially more attractive option, but it will also be the more likely last resort for players than cannot get their grades and test scores in order.

Mudiay is just the third elite basketball prospect to try and make his way to the NBA by skipping college and jumping to the professional ranks overseas. Neither player had a positive experience, cashing in on a quick payday that cost them the chance to play major minutes at the collegiate level while developing a brand that comes with the exposure of playing on ESPN 30 times a year:

  • Brandon Jennings, the No. 1 prospect in the Class of 2008, hated life during his one season at Virtus Roma before becoming the No. 10 pick in the 2009 draft. He signed a three-year, $24-million deal with Detroit, an income supplemented by a shoe deal with Under Armour that he signed prior to playing a game in Italy.
  • Jeremy Tyler, who at one point was the No. 1 recruit in the Class of 2010, signed a contract in Israel after his junior season in high school, quitting that team midway through the season and spending a tsunami-shortened year in Japan before getting picked 39th in the 2011 draft. He’s played 80 NBA games in three years.

It’s easy to be blinded by the amount of fast-cash available, and I’d never criticize a player for capitalizing on his talents when the NCAA’s arcane amateurism rules bar it, but the fact remains that turning pro overseas is, quite simply, not easy.

For starters, these 18 and 19 year olds will be moving to a different country halfway around the world where they will know little about the culture and less about the language that everyone else will be speaking. They will be playing against grown men, professionals with years of experience, some of whom played major minutes in the NBA after starring at the collegiate level. The transition from high school to college basketball is not an easy one to make; going from high school to the professional ranks is markedly more difficult.

And all that is before you consider that these basketball lifers, these men grinding out their living away from their families, would love nothing more than showing up some hotshot young prospect thinking he can waltz and steal some minutes.

All of that is why Mudiay’s success will be monitored by fellow elite prospects as well as the coaches recruiting them.

“We will be watching very closely, as I know quite a few people will be,” a parent of a five-star recruit still in high school told NBCSports.

As of right now, heading overseas is not that viable of an option for kids leaving high school. A successful season from Mudiay could change that line of thinking, but a third elite recruit heading abroad and having a dismal experience would only reinforce the notion that college basketball is the best way to get to the NBA.

Mudiay would have made SMU a top ten team heading into the 2014-2015 season. He could have changed the course of that basketball program if he had landed on campus for a mere seven months.

But with the money involved and the increased difficulty of getting eligible on campus and the potential to be stuck in college for two years, the fact of the matter is that Mudiay will be an infinitely more influential basketball player if he stars wherever he ends up playing his pro ball.

POSTERIZED: Kentucky’s Derek Willis drops a hammer on Florida

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It’s worth noting here that Derek Willis is not left-handed, yet he dunks this with his left hand.

UNC clinches share of ACC title in one of the top coaching jobs of Williams’ career

CHAPEL HILL, NC - JANUARY 16:  Head coach Roy Williams of the North Carolina Tar Heels celebrates after his 800th career victory with a 85-68 win over the Syracuse Orange at the Dean Smith Center on January 16, 2017 in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.  (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)
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No. 8 North Carolina knocked off Pitt on the road on Saturday afternoon, picking up an 85-67 win that clinched at least a share of the ACC regular season title for the Tar Heels this season.

It’s the second straight season and the eighth time in the 14 years that Roy Williams has been the head coach of the Tar Heels that they can make such a claim. For comparison’s sake, Mike Krzyzewski and Duke have won just three ACC regular season titles in those 14 years and they haven’t won one since 2010.

So this is a pretty good run that Roy Williams is on, and that’s before you consider the two national titles — plus a third national title game — that he’s won during that stretch.

And this year may be as impressive as any job that he’s done during his career.

This UNC team is different than past UNC teams in the sense that it’s the first time that one of his great teams doesn’t have a front line anchored by a future first round pick that is a killer on the block and a stallion running the floor in transition. There’s no Brice Johnson or Tyler Zeller or Tyler Hansbrough or Sean May. Joel Berry II is a really good college guard, but he’s not Kendall Marshall or Ray Felton or Ty Lawson, and his inconsistency is one of UNC’s bigger question marks heading into the tournament. Justin Jackson has turned into a killer this season, which is not something we would have said about Justin Jackson in any other year.

Put another way, this team is not a team that you can look at and know will be a title contender.

But they are.

They hold a two-game lead over an ACC that might get 10 teams into the NCAA tournament with two games left. If they win at Virginia next week, they will be playing for pride and for seeding when they take on Duke in the season finale.

I’d go as far as to say that the Tar Heels are as good, or better, than anyone in college basketball this season. They’ll probably end up as the No. 1 seed in the south and could very well make another run to the Final Four this season.

Considering just how good Williams has been throughout his career, and particularly during his tenure in Chapel Hill, you can understand what it means to say that this may very well be the best coaching job of his career.

Grayson Allen out for Duke against Miami

NEW YORK, NY - DECEMBER 06:  Grayson Allen #3 of the Duke Blue Devils reacts against the Florida Gators in the first half during the Jimmy V Classic at Madison Square Garden on December 6, 2016 in New York City.  (Photo by Michael Reaves/Getty Images)
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Duke will be without star junior guard Grayson Allen on Saturday.

According to a report from Greg Gumbel of CBS Sports, Allen will miss the Blue Devils’ road game at Miami with an ankle injury.

The 6-foot-5 Allen is averaging 15.0 points, 4.2 rebounds and 3.9 assists per game this season as he’s battled a few different injuries as well as getting suspended for another tripping incident. Duke is used to playing without Allen and the Blue Devils should still have enough to stay in this one against Miami but it is going to be a tough game to win on the road.

Duke is coming off of a road loss to Syracuse earlier this week as the No. 10 Blue Devils are trying to finish out a tough regular-season schedule these next three games.

VIDEO: Parents fly from Denmark to surprise Drake’s Jacob Enevold on Senior Day

DES MOINES, IA - DECEMBER 19: Center Jacob Enevold #11 of the Drake Bulldogs grabs a rebound in the first half away from forward Dom Uhl #25 of the Iowa Hawkeyes on December 19, 2015 during the Hy-Vee Big Four Classic at Wells Fargo Arena, in Des Moines, Iowa. (Photo by Matthew Holst/Getty Images)
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Drake senior center Jacob Enevold received a special surprise on Saturday afternoon as his parents flew all the way from Denmark to surprise him for Senior Day.

The 7-foot-1 Enevold appeared perfectly content to take part in the Senior Day celebrations when his parents appeared on the floor and he ran to greet them.

De’Aaron Fox out for Kentucky against Florida

LOUISVILLE, KY - DECEMBER 21:  De'Aaron Fox #0 of the Kentucky Wildcats shoots the ball during the game against the Louisville Cardinals at KFC YUM! Center on December 21, 2016 in Louisville, Kentucky.  (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)
(Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)
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Starting freshman guard De’Aaron Fox will be out for Kentucky on Saturday as the Wildcats host Florida in an important SEC showdown.

The 6-foot-3 Fox has a knee contusion, and without him, the Wildcats will start senior Mychael Mulder. Fox is averaging 15.5 points, 5.3 assists and 4.2 rebounds per game as he’s been one of the country’s best two-way freshmen this season.

Kentucky and Florida both enter Saturday’s game at 13-2 in SEC play but the Gators took the first matchup by 22 points between these two teams in Gainesville on Feb. 4.