Seven takeaways from the adidas Unrivaled Camp

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The first of July’s three live periods ended at 5:00 p.m. Sunday. Each of our writers were at an event last week, and each will be giving you seven takeaways from those events. 

RELATEDSeven takeaways from the LeBron James Skills Academy | And from Breakout Classic

CHICAGO — The adidas Unrivaled Camp at the Quest Multisport in Chicago gave a number of high-level players the chance to compete in a big camp for the first week of the July live evaluation period. With Nike running the LeBron James Skills Academy and Reebok hosting a camp during the first period as well, adidas had a strong showing with their inaugural event and it was littered with top-100 players from multiple classes.

Although the biggest news of the event was top-10 small forward Ray Smith tearing the ACL in his left knee, the camp also had a lot of breakout performances and a lot of major head coaches in attendance to watch five-star prospects like Jaylen Brown, Chase Jeter and Brandon Ingram.

1. Brandon Ingram makes a case for All-American status: There’s a long way to go in the July evaluation period, but no player did more to enhance their stock at the adidas Unrivaled Camp than North Carolina native and five-star wing Brandon Ingram. The 6-foot-8 Ingram was already the No. 25 overall player in the Class of 2015, according to Rivals, but he never played with as much confidence as he did during the week in Chicago. Ingram went toe-to-toe against top-five wing Jaylen Brown twice in Chicago and had great outings in both games. The concern for Ingram has always been consistency and playing against physical competition, but he answered some of those questions with his play at adidas.

2. Chase Jeter performs like a top-ten prospect: Top-ten Class of 2015 big man Chase Jeter had a strong spring on the adidas Gauntlet and that play carried over into a good week in Chicago. The 6-foot-10 native of Las Vegas has continued to progress with his go-to move of the right-handed hook shot and he’s improved his position on defense and as a rebounder. The USA Basketball experience that Jeter faced this summer has helped him both mentally and with his game and he’s playing with a lot of confidence.

3. The 2015 class is not as strong as the past few classes: While Class of 2015 prospects like Jaylen Brown, Deng Adel and Jalen Adams had solid weeks at adidas, this class of top 100 prospects, as a whole, doesn’t match up to any of the classes we’ve seen in the past few years. There are plenty of talented players that will do a lot of damage as freshmen in power conferences, but we shouldn’t be hearing the phrase “one-and-done” muttered with any of these guys with any sort of seriousness. Of course, that could change as we get through this group’s senior season and with a full year of college basketball — they are still young, after all — but the collective ceiling for this group isn’t nearly as high as 2013 or 2014 when it comes to maximum potential.

MOREAll our content from the 2014 July Live Recruiting Period

4. Outside of the dearth of elite big men in 2015, there aren’t many left: If you look at the top of the rankings for the Class of 2015, you’ll notice a lot of elite big men and front-court players littering the list. But after the top 30, or so, there’s a significant drop-off in the level of talent of the remaining big men in the class. College coaches have noticed this and they’re planning accordingly. It’s why Chase Jeter is attracting three coaches from Duke for two days worth of games and why other high-major college coaches are scrambling to find big bodies that can play. Fringe top-150 big men at adidas Unrivaled drew a lot of high-major assistant coaches hoping to find a diamond in the rough. While there might not have been a Ted Kapita-at-LeBron type of rise among the other big men at adidas, a couple of big guys like Texas natives Ricky Brice Jr., and Dante Williams showed some upside going forward.

5. The 2016 class has some talented guards: Kobi Simmons and Rawle Alkins both had fantastic weeks at adidas Unrivaled and the two tall and athletic guards both have bright futures. The 6-foot-5 Simmons is an open-floor dynamo and he’s nearly impossible to stop in transition with the ball in his hands. The Georgia native fits the recent mold of tall and athletic guards that have taken the college basketball world — and NBA Draft lottery — by storm. Not saying he’s that type of talent yet, but he’s in a similar mold. Alkins, on the other hand, is just a 6-foot-4 basketball player. The New York native is rugged like many of the city’s great guards before him and he can play either guard spot. Although his jumper can stand to improve, Alkins is a beast 15 feet-and-in and scores in so many unique ways. He has the athleticism to make plays at the rim while also having off-hand hooks on smaller guards and scoop shots off glass. Both guards were a lot of fun to watch and other 2016 guards with solid weeks included Indiana native Kyle Guy, Oregon native Payton Pritchard and Ohio native Jarron Cumberland.

6. Where have all the shooters gone?: This has been talked about by many of my colleagues that are recruiting analysts, but there just doesn’t seem to be that many high-level perimeter shooters in high school basketball. The adidas Camp made this painfully obvious at certain points. I watched one camp game where four three-pointers were hoisted in the first half and none of them drew iron. And most of the kids on the floor were in the top-150 range. Just because a player can make a three-pointer doesn’t mean he should be taking a three-pointer and too many players are practicing poor shot selection to go along with a glaring lack of shooting fundamentals. There were some ugly-looking jumpers being thrown up this week.

7. Camps are the new model for the first period in July: With Nike, Reebok and adidas all going with the camp model for high-major players, camps have become the basis of how recruiting gets done during the first July live evaluation period. This is a good and bad thing. It’s great for players who are invited because they get to play alongside talented peers in front of a bevy of college coaches but it’s also bad because the camp setting isn’t great for some types of players. Some players don’t mesh well with the teammates that they’ll have for only a few days and there aren’t many complicated plays or sets being run throughout the course of camp games. Big men can easily get frozen out for minutes at a time and you won’t find many shooters running around multiple off-ball screens — yet another reason why shooters were hard to come by this week.

Medical clearance brings difficult decision for Michael Porter, Jr.

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Michael Porter, Jr. came to an antiquated situation in a very modern way.

The 6-foot-11 phenom signed up to play for his father at his hometown university.

And Missouri really is more than just the hometown university for Porter — it’s home. His aunt has coached two of his sisters on the Tigers’ women’s team. His younger brother, one of his seven siblings, is also on the roster. After hitting rock-bottom in the Kim Anderson era, Missouri was getting its prodigal son and savior all in the same package.

Nevermind it came after his family moved to Seattle as his father was hired as an assistant by Lorenzo Romar in Washington, no doubt in part because of the long-standing relationship between the two men but also because Porter, Jr. is possibly a generational talent. And forget that his father’s next job came from Cuonzo Martin at Missouri.

In the end, Porter, Jr. began the season playing for his father and with his brother, a five-star center who reclassified in order to join the Tigers, undoubtedly envisioning a magical season alongside his family in his hometown in the pursuit of a national championship.

It’s not Hoosiers, but it ain’t far off.

The season hasn’t exactly worked out that way, and after Porter, Jr. found himself in a nostalgic role by following a contemporary path, in order to live out that he’ll have to turn his back on current-day — somewhat cynical — common sense logic to get one last chance at it.

After sitting out the whole season due to a back injury and with a week left in the regular season, Porter, Jr. has been cleared to return to basketball activities, seemingly setting up the decision on whether to give college basketball one last chance or simply sit out to preserve his best chance to make the most money in the NBA.

Essentially, it boils down to this: Is the added risk to the potential of hundreds of millions of dollars Porter, Jr. could make in the NBA worth the reward of an NCAA tournament run playing alongside his brother with his father on the bench at the university that in some ways has defined his family?

How much is that one chance of collegiate glory worth?

The simple answer for most in 2018 is not enough to justify playing.

Porter, Jr. probably can’t move the needle on his draft stock by playing. Could he possibly be good enough in just a couple weeks after months on the shelf to move ahead of Deandre Ayton? Luka Doncic? Mo Bamba or Marvin Bagley III? Maybe, but is going first or second that much of a difference than going fifth or sixth when the real money comes on his second and third contracts? Or his shoe deal?

Were he to injure himself — especially if it was an aggravation of the back injury or a foot issue — teams might have memories of Greg Oden flash before their eyes. Is there a team willing to risk a Joel Embiid-like injury profile in the first seven slots of a draft this strong?

On the other hand, Porter, Jr. is going to be drafted no matter what potentially happens after his potential return. I can’t imagine even in the most catastrophic of scenarios where he slips outside the top-half of the first round. He’ll make millions of dollars, and that’s the worst-case scenario. Playing, if he’s fully healthy, only adds some risk.

Is that added percent — or two or five or 15 — acceptable when weighed against the unique opportunity that generations of basketball players have dreamed of and never even been given chance to fulfill?

Charging headlong into a chance to win a title — and Missouri very well could be a title contender in a year like this year with a healthy Porter, Jr. — for your school, community and family has to be a tantalizingly tempting choice. Even if it doesn’t come with a paycheck.

It’s chasing a storybook ending over limiting future financial risk.

How to adjudicate those two choices is up to Porter, Jr.

It’s a choice he gets to make. Does he try to have it all or play it safe? Is the lure of shared family success stronger than that of financial security and better long-term viability?

Playing for free has a cost. Is Porter, Jr. willing to pay it?

NCAA president Mark Emmert on Yahoo report: ‘Systematic failures … must be fixed’

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NCAA president Mark Emmert released a statement on Friday morning in response to the allegations that were made in a bombshell report from Yahoo Sports.

Yahoo obtained documents detailing the recruitment methods that former NBA agent Andy Miller and an employee, Christian Dawkins, used to chase potential clients. Payments as high as $73,000 are detailed and current athletes like Duke’s Wendell Carter, Michigan State’s Miles Bridges, Kentucky’s Kevin Knox and Alabama’s Collin Sexton are all listed in those documents.

“These allegations, if true, point to systematic failures that must be fixed and fixed now if we want college sports in America,” Emmert’s statement read. “Simply put, people who engage in this kind of behavior have no place in college sports. They are an affront to all those who play by the rules.”

“Following the Southern District of New York’s indictments last year, the NCAA Board of Governors and I formed the independent Commission on College Basketball, chaired by Condoleezza Rice, to provide recommendations on how to clean up the sport. With these latest allegations, it’s clear this work is more important now than ever. The Board and I are completely committed to making transformational changes to the game and ensuring all involved in college basketball do so with integrity.”

“We also will continue to cooperate with the efforts of federal prosecutors to identify and punish the unscrupulous parties seeking to exploit the system through criminal acts.”

Report: Miles Bridges, Wendell Carter, Kevin Knox among players receiving benefits in FBI documents

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Yahoo Sports released a devastating report on Friday morning detailing some of the exact expenditures and impermissible benefits provided listed on records that were obtained by the FBI from the offices of former agent Andy Miller.

Among them?

Michigan State’s Miles Bridges, Duke’s Wendell Carter, Alabama’s Collin Sexton and Kentucky’s Kevin Knox, just to name a few. Past college stars like Dennis Smith Jr., Bam Adebayo and Markelle Fultz are also listed in the spreadsheets and documents obtained by Yahoo.

The report — and I encourage you to read it — details the elaborate payment, loan and recruitment strategy by Andy Miller’s agency, which includes outright payments to players, cash advances to parents, dinners that were paid for and plane tickets and travel that was provided to players and families.

Here’s the catch: What was provided to the biggest names currently in college is not all that great. Bridges’ mom allegedly received $400, according to an expense report filed by Dawkins, while Bridges’ parents had a meal with Dawkins listed at $70.05. Carter, Knox and Sexton are all tied to this by meals that families members had with Dawkins that the former Miller associate paid for.

Whether or not the players will be deemed ineligible is yet to be determine. The dollar value of the benefits listed in these documents is small enough that paying the money back might be enough to get their eligibility restored now even if it does mean that games they’ve played in previously will end up vacated.

There is also the argument that can be made that Dawkins is lying in these expense reports. In a business with as much cash flying around as this, is it too much of a stretch to assume that Dawkins had dinner with some friends or a girlfriend and passed the receipt off as a work expense?

It’s too early to tell what exactly will result from all of this.

But remember how we tried to tell you in September that this thing goes deep?

Well, here you go.

Thursday’s Three Things To Know: Drexel’s historic comeback, Arizona survives, Houston doesn’t

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1. DREXEL COMPLETED THE BIGGEST COMEBACK IN DIVISION I HISTORY

Drexel trailed Delaware 53-19 late in the first half on Thursday night.

They won 85-83.

Both of those things are 100 percent true and 100 percent happened.

2. ARIZONA WON WITHOUT ALLONZO TRIER … BARELY

No. 14 Arizona was forced to play without Allonzo Trier on Thursday night at Oregon State after Trier tested positive for a banned substance again. The Wildcats led by 12 points in the first half, but Wayne Tinkle’s club slowly but surely chipped away at the lead. They were ahead with less than a minute left with OSU missed two wide-open threes on the same possession before a pair of Rawle Alkins free throws forced overtime.

Alkins — who finished with 16 points on the night — took over in the extra frame, but if there is anything that we learned in the 45 minutes that Arizona played without Trier available on Thursday, it’s that they are going to struggle to win games if they do not have their second-leading scorer available.

3. TUBBY SMITH FINALLY BEAT A RANKED TEAM

Tubby Smith has been crushed throughout his tenure with Memphis, and deservedly so. The Tigers are not selling tickets and are not competing at a level that is expected of that program in the post-John Calipari era. That said, they aren’t terrible. On Thursday night, Memphis beat No. 23 Houston in FedEd Forum — Smith’s first win over a ranked opponent since he took over the job — to alleviate some of the heat that has been directed his way this season.

Houston, on the other hand, is probably pretty safe when it comes to inclusion into the NCAA tournament at this point, but they sure have had a weird seven days. It started with a win over Cincinnati, then turned into a 21-point win at Temple and concluded with a loss to Memphis. Such is life in the AAC, I guess.

Ford leads No. 22 Saint Mary’s past Pepperdine, 75-61

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MORAGA, Calif. (AP) — Jordan Ford had 18 points and a career-high 10 rebounds, and No. 22 Saint Mary’s rolled to a 75-61 victory over Pepperdine on Thursday night.

Calvin Hermanson scored 14 points and Tanner Krebs added 12 for the Gaels (26-4, 15-2 West Coast Conference). Jock Landale scored 10 points and grabbed six rebounds.

Ford shot 7 for 11 from the field and 4 for 6 from 3-point range and fell two points short of tying his career scoring high.

Saint Mary’s remained one game behind Gonzaga (26-4, 16-1), a 77-72 winner at San Diego, in the WCC with one regular-season game to play. The Gaels can earn a share of the WCC regular-season title with a victory at home against Santa Clara and a Gonzaga loss at BYU on Saturday.

Saint Mary’s point guard Emmett Naar, who injured his left ankle late in the first half against Portland on Saturday, started and had three points and six assists in 14 minutes, most of those in the first half.

Trae Berhow and Knox Hellums each scored 13 points for Pepperdine (4-25, 1-16).

Ford had 14 points and six rebounds in the first half, when Saint Mary’s built a 46-26 lead.

Pepperdine guard Eric Cooper Jr., who averages 13.2 points, did not make the trip because of a shoulder injury. Udenyi Amadi started in his place.

BIG PICTURE

Pepperdine: The Waves lost their eighth straight game and are locked into sole possession of last place in the WCC. Pepperdine will be the No. 10 seed in the upcoming conference tournament.

Saint Mary’s: The Gaels won their second straight after losing back-to-back games to Gonzaga on Feb. 10 and San Francisco on Feb. 15. Saint Mary’s had won a school-record 19 straight games before falling to Gonzaga.

UP NEXT

Pepperdine hosts Portland on Saturday in its WCC regular-season finale. The Waves fell 85-76 in overtime at Portland on Feb. 1.

Saint Mary’s hosts Santa Clara on Saturday in its final WCC regular-season game. The Gaels beat the Broncos 81-57 on Jan. 11 at Santa Clara.