Reebok Breakout Classic Day 1 Recap: Derryck Thornton outshines Diamond Stone, Skal Labissiere

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PHILADELPHIA — The matchup that headlined the first day of Reebok’s Breakout Classic was Diamond Stone squaring off with Skal Labissiere, a matchup between two top 15 big men in the Class of 2015.

But by the time the final buzzer sounded, the name that was being talked about was a diminutive point guard by the name of Derryck Thornton.

Thornton, the No. 11 recruit in the Class of 2016 according to Rivals, finished with 10 points, seven assists and five boards while leading his team to a two-point win. He controlled possession of the ball, knocked down a couple of mid-range jumpers off the dribble and was able to get into the lane and draw defenders while finding teammates Markis McDuffie and Tyus Battle open on the perimeter.

It was somewhat reminiscent of the way a certain point guard for the Los Angeles Clippers plays, and that’s not an accident.

“I watch a lot of film on point guards like Chris Paul and they get a lot of their points off of little pull-ups in the paint,” Thornton told NBCSports.com.

Now, it’s unfair to try and make a comparison between Thornton and Paul at this point in his development, but the five-star recruit plays with the same kind of ball-dominant style. His handle is elite and he’s clearly paid attention to the coaching he’s received on ball-screen actions. This wasn’t his first impressive performance of the summer, as he was the MVP of the Stephen Curry Camp in San Francisco last weekend, a camp that put a priority on skillwork over simple 5-on-5 play.

“We did a lot of drills,” Thornton said of the camp. “Pick-and-rolls, catch-and-shoot, off-the-dribble moves. A lot of skill work.”

That performance at a high-profile camp helped ramp up the recruitment of a player already getting plenty of attention from national programs. Kentucky, UConn, Michigan, Arizona and Florida are among the programs that have lined up to recruit the Findlay Prep point guard. To his credit, Thornton has tried his best to keep away from getting swept up in the hype.

“I’m trying not to, I’m really just trying to focus on my game,” Thornton said. “I wasn’t into it when I wasn’t as known and I’m not into it now.”

If he continues to perform this way, however, that hype is only going to continue to grow.

Diamond Stone’s macaroni mishap: The highlight of this trip to the Breakout Classic was a chance to see Diamond Stone, the No. 6 recruit in the Class of 2015, perform, but he only saw a limited amount of action on Wednesday night as he darted back and forth from the bench to the locker room. The problem? He ate too much macaroni and cheese before the game, according to his father.

“We’ve make macaroni with real cheese up in Wisconsin,” Stone’s father said with a laugh.

Stone’s ability was evident early on, however, as he scored over Skal Labissiere twice in the first three possessions on post moves and followed that up with a thunderous tip-dunk in transition. That’s all I needed to see to know that Stone’s ranking was legitimate, but hopefully tomorrow he’ll be able log more minutes.

Jawun Evans is the second best point guard in the Class of 2015: I’m more and more impressed with Evans every time I see him play, and while I don’t think his No. 32 ranking in the Class of 2015, per Rivals, is necessarily low, it is a good indicator of just how few point guards there are in this class.

Evans is super-quick with the ball in his hands but he’s not all that explosive vertically. He’s got a rock solid handle and I’ve yet to see him make the wrong decision with the ball in his hands, but his lack of a consistent perimeter stroke will make it difficult for him to beat defenders off the dribble at the next level. That should come with time, however, and the Kimball HS (TX) will make whichever of his final eight schools he picks very happy.

As one high-major assistant told me, “the kid’s an absolute stud.”

Dwayne Bacon’s ascent continues: Dwayne Bacon continues to establish himself as one of the elite wings in the Class of 2015 as he took over in the first half on the first day of camp. Bacon finished with 16 points, the majority of those coming in the first half, as he hit threes, beat people off the dribble and scored in transition. He’s had a big spring, and based on Wednesday’s performance, it doesn’t seem like he is going to be slowing down this summer.

Mykhailiuk returning to Kansas for senior season

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Kansas’ attempt for a 14th consecutive Big 12 title, and run for Bill Self’s second national title, got a shot in the arm Wednesday.

Svi Mykhailiuk announced that he will return to Lawrence for his final season of eligibility. “Senior year going to be fun,” he wrote on his Instagram page.

Senior year gonna be fun😈👌🏼🤘🏼 #KUCMB

A post shared by Sviatoslav Mykhailiuk (@sviat_10) on

The Jayhawks were already going to be loaded this season with Devonte Graham, a potential All-American, returning for his senior season and Udoka Azubuike healthy after missing last year due to injury along with Malik Newman becoming eligible after a transfer from Mississippi State and recruits Billy Preston and Marcus Garrett bolstering the ranks. The return of Mykhailiuk, though, only solidifies Kansas’ place not only atop the Big 12, but in the country.

Mykhailiuk, a 6-foot-8 forward, had something of a breakthrough season as a junior, posting career highs nearly across the board, including shooting 39.8 percent on nearly five 3-point shot attempts per game. With his size and shooting ability, Mykhailiuk was sure to garner professional interest, even though it would have been more likely than not he would been drafted in the second round of next month’s draft.

Mykhailiuk’s situation is certainly a unique one for college basketball as the Ukraine native enrolled at Kansas in 2014 just after his 17th birthday. He won’t turn 20 until next month, making him the same age as many sophomores and more likely to be viewed by NBA teams in the future as having upside, rather than a typical 22- or 23-year-old senior who scouts look at as having come close to reaching their ceiling.

Mykhailiuk wasn’t going to be the linchpin of Kansas’ success next season, but his decision to return shouldn’t be underestimated. His size, experience, skill and versatility provide the Jayhawks with a real weapon that will help alleviate pressure and expectations from other players up and down the roster. He’s very much a difference-maker for a team that will be contending for a spot in the Final Four.

Swanigan to stay in draft

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Caleb Swanigan is leaving Purdue and staying in the NBA draft.

The Boilermaker big man held as much sway on the college basketball landscape with his decision as nearly any player who declared for the draft without an agent. After a season in which he became a double-double machine and averaged 18.5 points, 12.5 rebounds and 3.1 assists per game, Swanigan would have been one of – if not the – favorites for National Player of the Year while also making Purdue right at the top of the Big Ten with Michigan State.

Instead, he’ll end his collegiate career after a pair of seasons and one Sweet 16 appearance in West Lafayette. As a professional prospect, Swanigan is an interesting case. He was as productive of player as college basketball has seen in recent years as a sophomore, putting up 20-20 games with ridiculous consistency. He’s got some range, but limited quickness and athleticism. The question will be how his game – and frame – will translate into the new NBA that prioritizes versatility, shooting and athleticism. Right now, not many have him pegged as a sure-fire first-round pick.

The loss for Purdue is hard to overstate given just how good “Biggie” was. There’s just no replacing that type of production in the lineup. Still, Matt Painter and the Boilermakers still have an intriguing group, with Isaac Haas and Vince Edwards both electing to return to school after dipping their toes in the NBA waters. There’s some other intriguing young pieces there that will keep Purdue interesting in the Big Ten race.

Florida State picks up late commit from McDonald’s All-American

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The losses sustained by Florida State have been numerous and significant. Three players declared early for the NBA Draft. Another two contributors were lost to graduation. All in all, the Seminoles haven’t had the greatest of springs.

Wednesday, though, they got some good news.

McDonald’s All-American wing M.J. Walker committed Leonard Hamilton’s program to give Florida State a late, and important, addition to its 2017 recruiting class, beating the likes of Ohio State, Georgia Tech and UCLA.

Walker, a 6-foot-5 guard, gives the Seminoles yet another five-star prospect after landing Dwayne Bacon and Jonathan Isaac in the last two recruiting classes. Walker will help Hamilton and Co. reboot after both Bacon and Isaac, along with Xavier Rathan-Mayes, all left school to pursue professional careers after the Seminoles’ 26-9 season that saw them advance to the second round of the NCAA tournament.

Walker becomes the sixth member of Hamilton’s 2017 recruiting class that was previously headlined by four-star 7-footer Ikechukwu Obiagu. That group will be tasked to retool a team losing not only major NBA-level talent, but also major production. The Seminoles won’t return a single player who averaged double-digit points per-game last year and just one who played at least 20 minutes per night.

Michigan returns Mo Wagner, loses D.J. Wilson

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The best-case scenario did not take place for Michigan this week.

The Wolverines waited for four weeks to hear back from their pair of mobile big men, and the news on Mo Wagner was positive. The 6-foot-10 junior from Germany announced on Wednesday that he will return to school after testing the NBA Draft waters.

The news was not as fortunate with D.J. Wilson, who announced less than ten hours before the deadline that he will be signing with an agent and turning pro. Wilson is projected as a late first round or early second round pick.

Without Wilson in the fold, Michigan lacks some front court depth, which will probably be enough to keep them out of the preseason top 25.

Gonzaga to return Johnathan Williams III

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Losing Nigel Williams-Goss and Zach Collins to the professional ranks probably torpedoed Gonzaga’s chance of making another run to the NCAA tournament national title game, but after Johnathan Williams III announced on Wednesday that he will be returning to school and withdrawing from the NBA Draft, Gonzaga does appear to be a favorite to win the WCC title again.

Williams is now Gonzaga’s leading returning scorer and rebounder, anchoring a front court that also loses Przemek Karnowski to graduation. He was expected to go undrafted.

With Williams back in the fold, the Zags should be right there with Saint Mary’s in the race for the WCC title. Josh Perkins, Silas Melson and Killian Tillie all return as well.

ESPN was the first to report the news.