AP

Jaylen Brown spent his spring traveling the world while impressing scouts

Leave a comment
source:
AP

WASHINGTON, D.C. — You can’t blame Jaylen Brown for being tired, not after the schedule that he’s had the last couple of months.

After traversing the country with his Adidas-affiliated Game Elite AAU program during the spring, Brown hopped on a plane to Treviso, Italy, where he took part in the Adidas Eurocamp in early June. The 6-foot-7, five-star wing stood out despite being quite a bit younger than a number of the players in attendance, but he caught a flight from the camp straight to Team USA’s headquarters in Colorado Springs, where he barely had a chance to unpack his bags before settling in for what turned into a two-week stay.

Brown not only made the U18 national team, he was one of the top performers during the American run to a gold medal, a tournament ended on June 24th. By June 27th, Brown was in DC for the three-day Kevin Durant Skills Academy.

I’m tired just thinking about it.

But, according to Brown, the fact that this wild couple of months drained him is evidence that … there’s a flaw in his game?

“I’ve got to get to an extreme level of conditioning so that I can play at a high level for a long period of time,” Brown told NBCSports.com at the Durant camp last week. “I need to play harder. I need to be able to play at a ten the whole time. There can’t be a dropoff, which is why I need that extreme level of conditioning. The elevation in Colorado messed with a lot of us, but you’ve got to get to that point to be the player that you want to be.”

It’s not the first time that Brown learned the hard way that he’s got to make an improvement to his body to get better. He’s a top three recruit in the Class of 2015, but during the summer after his sophomore year Brown played up a level, in U17 AAU tournaments. It didn’t take him long to realize that getting stronger was going to be a priority for him moving forward.

And, according to Brown, that’s the biggest reason that he’s become one of the hottest names in the Class of 2015.

“I feel like the big difference was me getting into the weight room,” Brown said. “I feel like I got stronger, and [now I’m] able to get all of my moves off, to dominate the game at my age group.”

“People last year were just as big and just as strong as I was, which made it difficult to try and score and made me find different ways to score, be more creative and stuff like that.”

That process isn’t over yet, however.

The player that Brown is most-commonly compared to is incoming Arizona-freshman Stanley Johnson. Both are 6-foot-7 power wings that can play anywhere on the court, from the point to the post. The difference, according to an NBA scout that was in attendance at the Durant camp, is lower body strength.

One of the coolest parts of events like the Durant Skills Academy is that the NBA stars attend, work out with and compete against the best high schoolers and college players at their position in the country. Johnson was at the camp as well, and both players made a point of going at Durant every chance they got. And if you know anything about Durant, you know that he’s not the type to back down from a challenge.

Durant’s post game was exposed during the 2014 NBA Playoffs, and it was clear that he’s put in time in the gym trying to improve it as the majority of his touches at the camp came in the post against some guys that have NBA length and athleticism. Durant was able to score with his back to the basket against Brown, overpowering the youngster as he backed his way into the lane. Johnson, however, was immovable, forcing Durant into turnaround and fadeaway jumpers.

“It was a good grading scale,” Brown said of the camp, “to know how I am compared to the rest of the wings across the country.”

And as of now, Brown’s the best there is at the high school level. He can handle the ball, he can score with his back to the basket, he can beat defenders off the dribble and his perimeter stroke is much better than it was at this point last season. He’s got the size to be a good rebounder at the next level and the anticipation and physical tools to be a playmaker defensively.

“I feel like I could play 1-through-4, whatever a coach needs me to play,” Brown said. “I want to be versatile, I don’t want a coach to put any limitations on me. So I want to tighten up on everything by college, that’s my goal, to be able to play 1-through-4.”

As of now, Brown says that UCLA, Georgia, Georgia Tech, Kentucky, Ohio State and Kansas are the six schools that are coming at him the hardest, but he’s also been vocal about the fact that he’s not a big fan of the recruiting process, telling NBCSports.com in May that he may end up committing to a school before the end of the summer.

“Sometimes you get tired of hearing the same stuff over and over again,” he told the Louisville Courier-Journal last month. “Some of them are 40, 50 years old. I’m 17, so what do we really have to talk about for 20 minutes?”

And that’s not the only evidence that Brown’s recruitment might end up going differently than a lot of coaches are used to.

“I just have to know,” Brown said when asked how his decision-making process. “I have to wake up one morning and be like this is the school for me. I have to be OK with a school if the coach leaves for anything, I want to feel comfortable with the school. Some people choose a school for the wrong reasons, just about basketball. There’s a lot of things incorporated when it comes to that decision.”

Five Things We Learned This Week: Jalen Brunson’s awesome, ACC POY and all the injuries

OMAHA, NEBRASKA-DECEMBER 31: Jalen Brunson #1 of the Villanova Wildcats drives to the basket between Maurice Watson Jr. and Marcus Foster #0 of the Creighton Bluejays during their game at the CenturyLink Center on December 31, 2016 in Omaha, Nebraska. (Photo by Eric Francis/Getty Images)
Eric Francis/Getty Images
Leave a comment

1. Jalen Brunson has been so good this year and no one’s talking about it: Maybe it’s because there are 6,000 quality point guards in college basketball this season. Maybe it’s because he’s been overshadowed by his teammate Josh Hart. Maybe it’s because he’s a sleepy-eyed, doughy land warrior-of-a-point guard and never, ever does anything flashy and simply cares more about winning than the attention that comes with it.

Whatever the case is, the improvement that Jalen Brunson has made this season has been one of the more overlooked story lines in college basketball this season. After a stellar, 22-point, 10-assists performance in a 22-point win at Seton Hall on Saturday – one that saw Brunson shoot a perfect 7-for-7 from the floor – the sophomore is averaging 14.6 points and 4.5 assists for the Wildcats this season.

He’s the engine that makes Villanova go. He’s the reason that the Wildcats haven’t missed Ryan Arcidiacono all that much this season. He’ll probably end up being the Big East Player of the Year at some point before his career comes to an end, and it’s all from a guy who looks like he’s moving about as quick as I do on a basketball court.

One NBA scout told me over the summer that Brunson is the “smartest player that I’ve ever scouted.”

And while he may not be the physical specimen that Dennis Smith Jr. or Lonzo Ball is, he’s pretty doggone talented, too.

RELATED: Player of the Week | Team of the Week | Takeaways | Top 25

You can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, Stitcher and Audioboom

2. There will be no team more battle-tested than Kansas in March: The Jayhawks have won 12 games in the Big 12, and at this point, that is basically enough to crown them the Big 12 champs for 13th straight season. Nine of them are by seven points or less. Seven are by five points or less. They came from 14 points down in the final three minutes to beat West Virginia. They won at Baylor in a game they trailed by 12. They beat Kentucky on the road by six points. They beat Duke by two. They lost to Indiana in overtime.

Some of that is luck – Svi’s travel against Kansas State, the legal illegal screen at Texas Tech – but a lot of it is some combination of talent, mental toughness and Bill Self. The bottom-line is this: No one will be more prepared to handle a close game in March than Kansas because no one has been through more this season than the Jayhawks.

3. Who you got in the ACC Player of the Year race?: Because it’s not easy to pick someone.

Let’s start with Luke Kennard, who is probably the most likely player from the league to earn a spot on an all-american team. But so much of his work was done early on in the season, before the start of conference play, which would bring us to Donovan Mitchell, who has been just sensational over the course of the last month, helping to buoy the Cardinals despite the fact that they spent quite a bit of time playing without both of the point guards on their roster. But then there is Justin Jackson, who has played the best basketball of his career in league play this year and is the best player on the team that currently looks primed to win the conference regular season title outright.

Those three are probably the favorites.

But what about Notre Dame’s Bonzie Colson, whose ability to star at the four in the ACC despite standing just 6-foot-5 is astonishing. Or Wake Forest’s John Collins, who has gone for at least 20 points in ten straight games and has notched a double-double in six of those ten games. Or Dennis Smith Jr., who is putting up crazy numbers for a terrible team.

I’d lean Jackson over Mitchell and Kennard at this point, but I change my mind almost daily.

DURHAM, NC - FEBRUARY 09: Luke Kennard #5 of the Duke Blue Devils battles for a loose ball against Justin Jackson #44 of the North Carolina Tar Heels during their game at Cameron Indoor Stadium on February 9, 2017 in Durham, North Carolina. (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)
Luke Kennard and Justin Jackson (Photo by Streeter Lecka/Getty Images)

4. Tell me what to make of Wichita State: I’m at a loss.

On the one hand, they’re 25-4 on the season and straight steamrolling teams in the Missouri Valley. They beat Illinois State by 41 points. They beat Northern Iowa, who had won eight of nine entering the game, by 29 points. They’re rated 13th by KenPom.com, and they’re coached by a man named Gregg Marshall, maybe you’ve heard of him. That has cache.

But their only top 100 win on the season is Illinois State, whose only top 50 win on the season in Wichita State. The Shockers lost Fred VanVleet and Ron Baker to graduation, and the Valley, as a whole, isn’t the league that it’s been in the past.

So they’re good, right?

I think we can all agree on that.

But just how good? Try and find a way to cogently answer that question.

5. Injuries just keep piling up this season: On Saturday, it was Michigan State’s Eron Harris who suffered a nasty-looking knee injury that turned out to be a season-ender, joining a list that already includes teammates Gavin Schilling and Ben Carter. That happened about 90 minutes before Georgia star forward Yante Maten suffered what the team termed a knee sprain just 90 seconds into a game against Kentucky, a win the Bulldogs desperately needed. That happened the same week that Florida center John Egbunu went down for the season with a torn ACL and North Carolina announced that guard Kenny Williams will likely miss the rest of the season with a knee injury.

Oklahoma’s Jordan Woodard tore his ACL. Virginia Tech’s Chris Clarke tore his ACL. Kansas center Udoka Azubuike had season-ending surgery on his wrist. Villanova’s Phil Booth hasn’t played since the third game of the year. UConn lost Terry Larrier and Alterique Gilbert for the season.

Oh, there’s more.

It’s not just the volume of players. Look at these names: Indiana lost O.G. Anunoby to a season-ending knee injury. Creighton lost their all-american point guard Mo Watson to a torn ACL just a few weeks before Xavier star point guard Edmond Sumner tore his. Arizona’s Ray Smith tore his ACL for the third time in the preseason and retired. Harry Giles III had his third knee surgery in the preseason and still isn’t close to healthy.

And I guarantee that I missed some names.

Team of the Week: Arkansas Razorbacks

FAYETTEVILLE, AR - FEBRUARY 23:    Head Coach Mike Anderson of the Arkansas Razorbacks reacts to a call during a game against the Alabama Crimson Tide at Bud Walton Arena on February 23, 2012 in Fayetteville, Arkansas.  The Crimson Tide defeated the Razorbacks 79-68.  (Photo by Wesley Hitt/Getty Images)
Wesley Hitt/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Two weeks ago it looked like it was over, for both Arkansas and Mike Anderson.

The Razorbacks capped a stretch where they lost three of four games by getting smacked at home by Vanderbilt and losing to Missouri. They looked like a longshot to get into the tournament, not necessarily because they didn’t have the profile to earn an at-large bid at the time, but because any team that can lose at Missouri can lose to anyone, anywhere, any time.

The kicker?

Missing the tournament could very well be the end of Anderson’s tenure with Arkansas. There’s a reason he was on just about every hot seat list entering the season, and it looked like Arkansas was on the verge of fulfilling that prophecy.

Until this week.

On Wednesday, went into Columbia and knocked off No. 21 South Carolina in a win that should give them some breathing room on the right side of the bubble, following that up with a drubbing of Ole miss in Fayetteville.

Nothing is certain yet, not for a team capable of losing to Missouri, but as of today, the Razorbacks have gotten into the dance, likely, saved their coach’s job.

RELATED: Player of the Week | Team of the Week | Takeaways | Top 25

You can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, Stitcher and Audioboom

THEY WERE GOOD, TOO

  • Kansas: The Jayhawks didn’t have themselves a bad week, coming back from 14 points down in the final three minutes to force overtime in a win over No. 9 West Virginia. They followed that up by coming back from six points down in the final three minutes to knock off No. 4 Baylor in Waco. Through it all, they managed to all-but lock up their 13th straight Big 12 regular season title.
  • Minnesota: We might as well lock the Gophers into a tournament bid at this point, and they’ll probably end up getting a higher seed than you may realize, thanks to close wins over both Indiana and Michigan this week. We’ll know a lot more about them in the next two weeks, however, as they have to visit both Maryland and Wisconsin before the season is out.
  • UCLA: The Bruins snapped a four-game losing streak against intra-city rival USC on Saturday, and they did it in statement fashion, winning by 32. UCLA put up 102 points on the Trojans, outscoring them by 22 points and doing a fair bit of showboating down the stretch. There was a point to be made in this game, and Steve Alford’s club accomplished that.
  • UNC: The Tar Heels made a statement on Saturday night during Gameday, mollywhopping No. 14 Virginia to the tune of a 65-41 win that didn’t ever feel that close. Their defense showed up, Virginia did not. And if that wasn’t enough, they beat N.C. State bad enough on Wednesday that the Wolfpack fired their head coach.
  • VCU: The Rams have now won eight straight games after beating Saint Joe’s and winning at Richmond, VCU’s intra-city rival, on Friday night. One of those wins was against St. Bonaventure, when they won thanks to a premature court storm, and one of those wins was against George Washington, when they won thanks to a questionable foul call with 0.4 seconds left, but it doesn’t matter. VCU has played their way into the tournament either way.

Player of the Week: Lauri Markkanen, Arizona

TUCSON, AZ - JANUARY 12:  Lauri Markkanen #10 of the Arizona Wildcats drives the ball past Torian Graham #4 of the Arizona State Sun Devils during the first half of the college basketball game at McKale Center on January 12, 2017 in Tucson, Arizona.  (Photo by Christian Petersen/Getty Images)
Christian Petersen/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Lauri Markkanen entered this week mired in an awful slump.

Over the course of his last four games, he was shooting 20 percent from the floor and 25 percent from three. He hadn’t scored more than eight points in any of the four games and, frankly, looked nothing like the seven-footer who had drawn comparisons to Dirk Nowitzki as he averaged 15.4 points and shot 45.7 percent from three.

That was until the Wildcats had to play against the Washington schools.

With Dusan Ristic and Kadeem Allen both battling injury, Markkanen played some of his best basketball of the season, averaging 22.5 points and 12.0 boards in the two wins. The most promising part of it is that Markannen was more than willing to change his game, going away from being a perimeter oriented player to anchoring Arizona’s post offense. On the season, roughly 45 percent of Markannen’s field goals come from beyond the arc. This past week, just six of the 30 shots he attempted were three-balls.

Yes, it came against Washington State and Washington.

But that’s not what matters here.

What matters is that Lauri got his groove back and Sean Miller figured out that he has another option to work the post if Ristic gets himself into foul trouble or sprains an ankle during the NCAA tournament.

RELATED: Player of the Week | Team of the Week | Takeaways | Top 25

You can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, Stitcher and Audioboom

THEY WERE GOOD, TOO

  • Mike Daum, South Dakota State: Daum went for 51 points and 15 boards, hitting seven threes as a 6-foot-9 forward, as the Jackrabbits beat Fort Wayne on Saturday. That came on the heels of a 26-point performance during the week. Daum is the first player to score 51 points in a game since … South Dakota State’s own Nate Wolters in 2013.
  • Frank Mason, Kansas: Mason played just about his best game of the season on Saturday, finishing with 23 points and eight assists as the Jayhawks went into Waco and knocked off No. 4 Baylor. That came on the heels of a 24-point, 5-assists, 4-rebound performance in Monday’s comeback win over No. 9 West Virginia.
  • Jayson Tatum, Duke: Tatum had 19 points and seven boards in Duke’s win over Wake Forest on Saturday, but his most impressive performance came on Wednesday night, when he had 28 points and eight boards – including three game-changing threes in the final five minutes – as the Blue Devils landed an impressive road win over No. 14 Virginia.
  • Markus Howard, Marquette: Howard went for 34 points and tied a Marquette record by hitting nine threes on Saturday night as the Golden Eagles landed a statement, 22-point win over Xavier. That win may be enough to get Marquette into the NCAA tournament.
  • Khadeen Carrington, Seton Hall: Carrington went for a career-high 41 points and seven assists as the Pirates landed a critical win over No. 20 Creighton last week, one that could be enough to get Seton Hall into the tournament. He also had a team-high 22 points in the loss to Villanova on Saturday.

College Basketball Talk Top 25: So what do we do with Baylor and Virginia right now?

LOUISVILLE, KY - DECEMBER 28:  London Perrantes #32 of the Virginia Cavaliers dribbles the ball during the game against the Louisville Cardinals at KFC YUM! Center on December 28, 2016 in Louisville, Kentucky.  (Photo by Andy Lyons/Getty Images)
Andy Lyons/Getty Images
Leave a comment

The big question this week is what to do with Baylor and what to do with Virginia.

With Baylor, it’s pretty clear: They’re still a top ten team, but as of today, they’re just not playing as well as they were earlier in the season. They’ve lost four of their last six games, but it’s not like they were embarrassed in any of the four. They came back and had three shots to win or force overtime in their loss at home to Kansas State. They lost at Texas Tech, who very nearly beat Kansas in that same gym. They got swept by Kansas, turning the ball over when they had a chance to force overtime at Phog Allen Fieldhouse and losing by two at home after their best guard, Manu Lecomte, injured himself midway through the second half.

What’s that tell us?

Baylor isn’t some dominant team. But there is no dominant team anywhere this season, and while Baylor has been on the wrong end of some bad luck and a couple poor finishes, they’re still the same Baylor they’ve been all season. They’ll get this thing turned around soon enough.

Virginia is a different story. They’ve now lost three in a row and five of their last seven games, falling all the way off the pace in the ACC title race. The Wahoos, however, are in much more trouble than Baylor because they simply are running out of ways to score. They had 44 points with two minutes left in their loss to Duke. They managed just 41 points in their loss to North Carolina.

But here’s the question that needs to be asked: Is Virginia struggling because they aren’t good enough to win a game or two in March, or is this a direct result of having to play Duke and North Carolina in back-to-back games?

You tell me.

Anyway, here are the full rankings:

RELATED: Player of the Week | Team of the Week | Takeaways | Top 25

You can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, Stitcher and Audioboom

1. Gonzaga (28-0, Last Week: No. 1)
2. Villanova (26-2, 2)
3. Kansas (24-3, 3)
4. Louisville (22-5, 4)
5. Oregon (24-4, 6)
6. North Carolina (23-5, 6)
7. Arizona (25-3, 8)
8. UCLA (24-3, 9)
9. Baylor (22-5, 5)
10. West Virginia (21-6, 10)
11. Kentucky (22-5, 12)
12. Duke (22-5, 12)
13. Purdue (22-5, 13)
14. Florida (22-5, 15)
15. Wisconsin (22-5, 15)
16. Cincinnati (24-3, 18)
17. SMU (24-4, 19)
18. Notre Dame (21-7, 20)
19. Saint Mary’s (24-3, 21)
20. Florida State (21-6, 17)
21. Iowa State (17-9, UR)
22. Virginia (18-8, 14)
23. Northwestern (20-7, 23)
24. Butler (21-6, UR)
25. Wichita State (25-4, UT)

DROPPED OUT: No. 22 South Carolina, No. 24 Xavier, No. 25 Creighton
NEW ADDITIONS: No. 21 Iowa State, No. 24 Butler, No. 25 Wichita State

You Make The Call: Did Tyler Roberson set an illegal screen?

SYRACUSE, NY - JANUARY 28:  Tyler Roberson #21 of the Syracuse Orange dunks the ball against the Florida State Seminoles during the first half at the Carrier Dome on January 28, 2017 in Syracuse, New York. (Photo by Rich Barnes/Getty Images)
Rich Barnes/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Syracuse was unable to cap off a thrilling comeback on Sunday night due, in large part, to the fact that Tyler Roberson was called for an illegal screen with 16 seconds left in the game and the Orange down just two points.

They had gone on a 20-9 run in the previous four minutes to close the deficit, and had gotten a stop in order to get the ball on that possession.

But here’s the thing: The call was, to put it politely, controversial. I don’t think that Tyler Roberson committed a foul here.

You make the call:

The loss put the Orange in a bad spot with just two weeks left before the end of the regular season. We go all the way through their at-large profile here.