Jaylen Brown spent his spring traveling the world while impressing scouts

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WASHINGTON, D.C. — You can’t blame Jaylen Brown for being tired, not after the schedule that he’s had the last couple of months.

After traversing the country with his Adidas-affiliated Game Elite AAU program during the spring, Brown hopped on a plane to Treviso, Italy, where he took part in the Adidas Eurocamp in early June. The 6-foot-7, five-star wing stood out despite being quite a bit younger than a number of the players in attendance, but he caught a flight from the camp straight to Team USA’s headquarters in Colorado Springs, where he barely had a chance to unpack his bags before settling in for what turned into a two-week stay.

Brown not only made the U18 national team, he was one of the top performers during the American run to a gold medal, a tournament ended on June 24th. By June 27th, Brown was in DC for the three-day Kevin Durant Skills Academy.

I’m tired just thinking about it.

But, according to Brown, the fact that this wild couple of months drained him is evidence that … there’s a flaw in his game?

“I’ve got to get to an extreme level of conditioning so that I can play at a high level for a long period of time,” Brown told NBCSports.com at the Durant camp last week. “I need to play harder. I need to be able to play at a ten the whole time. There can’t be a dropoff, which is why I need that extreme level of conditioning. The elevation in Colorado messed with a lot of us, but you’ve got to get to that point to be the player that you want to be.”

It’s not the first time that Brown learned the hard way that he’s got to make an improvement to his body to get better. He’s a top three recruit in the Class of 2015, but during the summer after his sophomore year Brown played up a level, in U17 AAU tournaments. It didn’t take him long to realize that getting stronger was going to be a priority for him moving forward.

And, according to Brown, that’s the biggest reason that he’s become one of the hottest names in the Class of 2015.

“I feel like the big difference was me getting into the weight room,” Brown said. “I feel like I got stronger, and [now I’m] able to get all of my moves off, to dominate the game at my age group.”

“People last year were just as big and just as strong as I was, which made it difficult to try and score and made me find different ways to score, be more creative and stuff like that.”

That process isn’t over yet, however.

The player that Brown is most-commonly compared to is incoming Arizona-freshman Stanley Johnson. Both are 6-foot-7 power wings that can play anywhere on the court, from the point to the post. The difference, according to an NBA scout that was in attendance at the Durant camp, is lower body strength.

One of the coolest parts of events like the Durant Skills Academy is that the NBA stars attend, work out with and compete against the best high schoolers and college players at their position in the country. Johnson was at the camp as well, and both players made a point of going at Durant every chance they got. And if you know anything about Durant, you know that he’s not the type to back down from a challenge.

Durant’s post game was exposed during the 2014 NBA Playoffs, and it was clear that he’s put in time in the gym trying to improve it as the majority of his touches at the camp came in the post against some guys that have NBA length and athleticism. Durant was able to score with his back to the basket against Brown, overpowering the youngster as he backed his way into the lane. Johnson, however, was immovable, forcing Durant into turnaround and fadeaway jumpers.

“It was a good grading scale,” Brown said of the camp, “to know how I am compared to the rest of the wings across the country.”

And as of now, Brown’s the best there is at the high school level. He can handle the ball, he can score with his back to the basket, he can beat defenders off the dribble and his perimeter stroke is much better than it was at this point last season. He’s got the size to be a good rebounder at the next level and the anticipation and physical tools to be a playmaker defensively.

“I feel like I could play 1-through-4, whatever a coach needs me to play,” Brown said. “I want to be versatile, I don’t want a coach to put any limitations on me. So I want to tighten up on everything by college, that’s my goal, to be able to play 1-through-4.”

As of now, Brown says that UCLA, Georgia, Georgia Tech, Kentucky, Ohio State and Kansas are the six schools that are coming at him the hardest, but he’s also been vocal about the fact that he’s not a big fan of the recruiting process, telling NBCSports.com in May that he may end up committing to a school before the end of the summer.

“Sometimes you get tired of hearing the same stuff over and over again,” he told the Louisville Courier-Journal last month. “Some of them are 40, 50 years old. I’m 17, so what do we really have to talk about for 20 minutes?”

And that’s not the only evidence that Brown’s recruitment might end up going differently than a lot of coaches are used to.

“I just have to know,” Brown said when asked how his decision-making process. “I have to wake up one morning and be like this is the school for me. I have to be OK with a school if the coach leaves for anything, I want to feel comfortable with the school. Some people choose a school for the wrong reasons, just about basketball. There’s a lot of things incorporated when it comes to that decision.”

VIDEOS: Rhode Island, Maryland exchange heated words in Cancun

Dan Hurley
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No. 2 Maryland finally found their rhythm on Wednesday night, blowing out a good Rhode Island team, 86-63, in the finals of the Cancun Challenge.

Melo Trimble and Rasheed Sulaimon combined for 34 points and eight assists on 13-for-14 shooting and Robert Carter added 15 points, nine boards, three assists and three blocks. Peak Maryland, which is what we saw tonight, is really dangerous.

But Peak Maryland wasn’t the story after the game, as tempers flared in the waning minutes.

It started when Maryland coach Mark Turgeon called a timeout with less than two minutes remaining. Jake Layman had just hit a three to put Maryland up by 24 points and Turgeon wanted to get his walk-ons in the game. Hurley said to the Maryland bench, “We’ll see you again, boy,” according to Inside Maryland Sports, which prompted this reaction from Turgeon:

After the game, the two teams had to be separated in layup lines. According to reports from IMS and from the Baltimore Sun, Hurley was cursing at Maryland players as he was shaking their hands after the game. According Doug Gottlieb, who called the game for CBS Sports Network, Trimble said that the Rhode Island team wanted to “fight us”:

Wayne Selden stars as Kansas wins the title in Maui

Wayne Selden Jr., Jeff Roberson
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The last time we wrote about Wayne Selden in this space, it was my colleague Scott Phillips who questioned, after a poor performance in the Champions Classic, whether or not Selden is capable of bring a primary scorer for a team with NCAA title aspirations.

At the time, it wasn’t an unfair question to ask.

Selden is a former top 15 recruit. He is a guy who was expected to go one-and-done that played poorly in the first big game of his third year on campus. But after three days it Maui, it appears that the old Wayne Selden is gone.

[MORE: Kansas got Cheick Diallo news today]

He capped an MVP performance in the Maui Invitational with 25 points and seven boards on 8-for-11 shooting as the No. 5 Kansas Jayhawks knocked off No. 19 Vanderbilt, 70-63, in the title game. Selden was terrific for the entire weekend, averaging 21.5 points in the two games against Division I competition and shooting 12-for-17 from beyond the arc in the three game tournament.

It was the best that we’ve seen Selden play during his Jayhawk career, and it came in a game the Jayhawks desperately needed it. Vanderbilt is a damn good team. They’re ranked 19th, which may actually be too low, and they seem to clearly be the biggest challenger to Kentucky in the SEC. They jumped out to a double-digit lead on Kansas in the first half as the Jayhawks seemed to be sleep-walking early in the game.

Enter Selden. He drilled three threes in the first half and scored 13 of the 26 Jayhawk points to keep them close. In other words, he played like a star on a night Kansas desperately needed someone to step up and play like a star. Remember: this is a dude that had enough talent and potential in high school to be considered a McDonald’s All-American and a potential lottery pick. The ability is there:

(That move is filthy.)

The question has always been whether or not he is capable of putting it all together, of being the guy that can be relied upon to make the big play in the big moment, to carry a team with title aspirations.

And to be fair, the jury is still out in that regard. Are we just going to ignore those four free throws he clanged down the stretch?

But seeing Selden have this kind of performance in a game like this against a team that is this good is unquestionably a positive for Kansas moving forward.