How do coaches balance the allure of the NBA with running their program?

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In the aftermath of a team’s final game of the season, one of the most important tasks for a head coach is to figure out what his players entertaining thoughts of leaving school early to enter the NBA Draft will do. There’s the solicitation of information from the NBA’s Undergraduate Advisory Committee, conversations with family members and the player himself as he debates what will, to this point, be the most important decision of his life. In the best situation no stone is left unturned, thus ensuring that the player will have all the accurate information he needs to make a sound decision.

For those who return to school there are a number of possible reasons, from deciding that they aren’t ready for the professional ranks to the desire to help their program win a national title. That was the case for the Arizona’s Brandon Ashley, Rondae Hollis-Jefferson and Kaleb Tarczewski, who announced their decisions to return to Tucson on the same day teammates Aaron Gordon and Nick Johnson declared their intentions to leave school early.

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“The one reason we’re all coming back here is we have sort of unfinished business here at U of A,” Tarczewski said during their press conference, and it should be noted that none of the three sought feedback from the Advisory Committee before making their decisions. “There’s no question that all three of us could say we’ve had a great career no matter how long it’s been.

“When we signed on here our goal was to make it to a Final Four, to be able to play for a national championship and next year that’s our goal. We’re all grateful to say we have another year and hopefully we’ll get it done.”

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One aspect of the return to school that some players may struggle with is the balance between doing what would best enhance their prospects of making the move to the next level and doing what their college team needs in order to be successful. While the feedback received from professional scouts and executives can certainly be beneficial as a player looks to become the best pro possible, it’s the college coach who has the spent the greatest amount of time working with the player.

“We do, but nobody knows the player better than the college coach,” Arizona head coach Sean Miller told NBC Sports when asked how much professional feedback he and his staff utilizes when working with their players. “Because not only are we around them on a daily basis working with them on all types of different scenarios, for the most part we’ve recruited them. I think we have a great barometer and feel for our own players.

“And no question, if we can get some additional feedback to help us better coach [our players] then certainly we’ll use that. But for the most part, our barometer is our staff.”

The best situation for the coach and the returning player is when the area (or areas) where a player needs to improve to become a more attractive professional prospect falls in line with what the team will need in order to put forth a better effort the following season. That’s the case for Utah rising senior guard Delon Wright, who enjoyed a very productive debut season in Salt Lake City. Wright was one of the Pac-12’s most versatile players in 2013-14, leading the Utes in scoring, assists and steals and ranking second on the team in rebounds.

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But there was also the need to improve his perimeter shot, with Wright making just 22.2% of his shots from beyond the arc. Improvement in that aspect of his game would not only make Wright a tougher player to defend, thus improving his individual standing as a pro prospect, but it also stands to make Utah a better team offensively. And it helps Wright that he can receive assessments of his game from multiple people with experience at the NBA level, including Utah head coach Larry Krystkowiak and his older brother Dorell who just completed his tenth season in the NBA.

“I do think it’s an aid over the course of a season, just to know that I’ve been there and understand the way things work,” Krystkowiak told NBC Sports. “So I think it adds some validity when discussing what it takes to play at the next level.”

Having coaches and former players — and in the case of Wright, a family member — who have gone through the NBA evaluation process as either a player or coach can prove beneficial for prospects facing the task of sifting through the many sources of information. Because while the goal is to gather as much information as possible before making an educated decision, not all available information is accurate or honest.

And if the player and coach aren’t on the same page, that could result in the process becoming more complicated than it needs to be.

“Everybody at Arizona is treated the same way with that in mind,” noted Miller. “We try to give [the player] and their family the best and the most feedback that we can, so that when they make their decision they have the best and most accurate information possible. That may seem simple but there’s a lot going on, and once in a while the information that they receive isn’t accurate.”

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Certainly there can be concerns about how players will handle a return to school after flirting with the idea of entering the NBA Draft. But the task of handling those issues is a lengthy process, something that isn’t taken care of in a single conversation. There will be ups and downs, and for some there will be moments in which they wonder “what could have been.”

The combination of managing those thoughts and making sure the quest to improve one’s standing in the eyes of NBA types doesn’t come at the expense of team goals ultimately determines how successful the return to school will be. While the statistics and measurements are certainly important to professional franchises, the ability to help your team achieve success is as well.

“Anytime you have success as a team, that’s going to enhance your chances of potentially going on to play at the next level,” noted Krystkowiak.

Five-star Brandon McCoy commits to UNLV

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After the season that UNLV had, the Runnin’ Rebels desperately needed some good news, and this certainly qualifies: On Tuesday night, five-star center Brandon McCoy announced that he had committed to head coach Marvin Menzies.

McCoy is a five-star prospect and a top 15 recruit that hails from San Diego. He picked the Rebels over Arizona, Oregon and Michigan State, among others.

UNLV went 11-21 a season ago as Menzies took over a program that was a shambles after the majority of the roster transferred out following Dave Rices dismissal.

2017 NBA Draft official early entry list

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On Tuesday, the NBA announced the early entries for the 2017 NBA Draft. More than 130 student-athletes have filed early-entry paperwork to enter the upcoming draft. That doesn’t include the dozens of international prospects who will also be eligible for the upcoming draft.

Players wishing to maintain their NCAA eligibility must withdraw from the draft by May 24.  The 2017 NBA Draft will take place on June 22.

Here is the current list of early entrants:

Shaqquan Aaron, USC Soph.
Jaylen Adams, St. Bonaventure Jr.
Edrice Adebayo, Kentucky Fresh.
Deng Adel, Louisville Soph.
Jashaun Agosto,LIU Fresh.
Bashir Ahmed, St. John’s Jr.
Rawle Alkin, Arizona Fresh.
Jarrett Allen, Texas Fresh.
Mark Alstork, Wright State  Jr.
Ike Anigbogu, UCLA Fresh.
OG Anunoby, Indiana Soph.
Dwayne Bacon, Florida State Soph.
Lonzo Ball, UCLA Fresh.
Jaylen Barford, Arkansas Jr.
Jordan Bell, Oregon Jr.
Trae Bell-Haynes, Vermont Jr.
James Blackmon Jr., Indiana Jr.
Antonio Blakeney, LSU Soph.
Trevon Bluiett, Xavier Jr.
Bennie Boatwright, USC Soph.
Jacobi Boykins, Louisiana Tech Jr.
Tony Bradley, North Carolina Fresh.
Isaiah Briscoe, Kentucky Soph.
Dillon Brooks, Oregon Jr.
Thomas Bryant, Indiana Soph.
Rodney Bullock, Providence Jr.
Jevon Carter, West Virginia Jr.
Clandell Cetoute, Thiel College (PA) Jr.
Joseph Chartouny, Fordham Soph.
Donte’ Clark, Massachusetts Jr.
Chris Clemons, Campbell  Soph.
David Collette, Utah Jr.
John Collins, Wake Forest Soph.
Zach Collins, Gonzaga Fresh.
Chance Comanche, Arizona  Soph.
Angel Delgado, Seton Hall Jr.
Hamidou Diallo, Kentucky Fresh.
Tyler Dorsey, Oregon  Soph.
PJ Dozier, South Carolina Soph.
Vince Edwards, Purdue Jr.
John Egbunu, Florida Jr.
Jon Elmore, Marshall Jr.
Obi Enechionyia, Temple Jr.
Drew Eubanks, Oregon State Soph.
Jawun Evans, Oklahoma State Soph.
Tacko Fall, Central Florida Soph.
Tony Farmer, Lee College (TX) Soph.
De’Aaron Fox, Kentucky Fresh.
Markelle Fultz, Washington Fresh.
Harry Giles, Duke Fresh.
Brandon Goodwin, FGCU Jr.
Donte Grantham, Clemson Jr.
Isaac Haas, Purdue Jr.
Aaron Holiday, UCLA Soph.
Isaac Humphries, Kentucky Soph.
Chandler Hutchison, Boise State Jr.
Jonathan Isaac, Florida State Fresh.
Frank Jackson, Duke Fresh.
Josh Jackson, Kansas Fresh.
Justin Jackson, Maryland Fresh.
Justin Jackson, North Carolina Jr.
Alize Johnson, Missouri State Jr.
Darin Johnson, CSU-Northridge Jr.
Jaylen Johnson, Louisville Jr.
Robert Johnson, Indiana Jr.
Andrew Jones, Texas Fresh.
Ted Kapita, North Carolina State Fresh.
Marcus Keene, Central Michigan Jr.
Luke Kennard , Duke Soph.
Braxton Key, Alabama Fresh.
George King, Colorado Jr.
Kyle Kuzma, Utah Jr.
Khadeem Lattin, Oklahoma Jr.
TJ Leaf, UCLA Fresh.
William Lee, UAB Jr.
Zach Lofton, Texas Southern Jr.
Tyler Lydon, Syracuse Soph.
Daryl Macon, Arkansas Jr.
Marin Maric, Northern Illinois Jr.
Lauri Markkanen, Arizona Fresh.
Yante Maten, Georgia Jr.
Markis McDuffie, Wichita State Soph.
MiKyle McIntosh, Illinois State Jr.
Eric Mika, BYU Soph.
Donovan Mitchell, Louisville Soph.
Malik Monk, Kentucky Fresh.
Matthew Morgan, Cornell Soph.
Shaquille Morris, Wichita State Jr.
Johnathan Motley, Baylor Jr.
Svi Mykhailiuk, Kansas Jr.
Divine Myles, Stetson Jr.
Derick Newton, Stetson Soph.
Austin Nichols, Virginia Jr.
Semi Ojeleye, SMU Jr.
Cameron Oliver, Nevada Soph.
Randy Onwuasor, Southern Utah Jr.
Justin Patton, Creighton Fresh.
L.J. Peak, Georgetown Jr.
Theo Pinson | North Carolina Jr.
Ivan Rabb, California Soph.
Xavier Rathan-Mayes, Florida State Jr.
Devin Robinson, Florida Jr.
Josh Robinson, Austin Peay Jr.
Martavius Robinson, Lewis & Clark CC (Illinois) Soph.
Maverick Rowan, North Carolina State Soph.
Corey Sanders, Rutgers Soph.
Victor Sanders, Idaho Jr.
Kobi Simmons, Arizona Fresh.
Fred Sims Jr., Chicago State Soph.
Dennis Smith Jr., North Carolina State Fresh.
Zach Smith, Texas Tech Jr.
Kamau Stokes, Kansas State Soph.
Edmond Sumner, Xavier Soph.
Caleb Swanigan, Purdue Soph.
Jayson Tatum, Duke Fresh.
Matt Taylor, New Mexico State Jr.
James Thompson IV, Eastern Michigan Soph.
Stephen Thompson Jr., Oregon State Soph.
Trevor Thompson,  Ohio State Jr.
Melo Trimble, Maryland Jr.
Craig Victor II, LSU Jr.
Moritz Wagner, Michigan Soph.
Tevonn Walker, Valparaiso Jr.
Antone Warren, Antelope Valley CC (CA) Soph.
Thomas Welsh, UCLA  Jr.
Thomas Wilder, Western Michigan Jr.
Cecil Williams, Central Michigan Jr.
Johnathan Williams, Gonzaga Jr.
Kam Williams, Ohio State Jr.
Nigel Williams-Goss, Gonzaga| Jr.
Christian Wilson, Texas-San Antonio Jr.
D.J. Wilson, Michigan Jr.
Omer Yurtseven, North Carolina State Fresh.

CBT Podcast: Breaking down the NBA Draft early entry list

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On the podcast today, I am joined by Sam Vecenie to break down all of the NBA Draft early entry decisions. Who are the key returnees? Who are the most important names still testing the waters?

Joel Berry to return to North Carolina for senior season

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A little more than a day after North Carolina Joel Berry II — along with Tony Bradley and All-American Justin Jackson — announced they would enter the 2017 NBA Draft, Berry reversed course decided to forgo the draft process and will return to Chapel Hill for his senior season.

“After speaking to my family I have decided to withdraw from the 2017 Draft and will return to Carolina next season,” Berry said in a statement released by the university on Tuesday evening. “I know I can continue to improve my game and be better prepared for the NBA after another year playing against the best college competition in the country. There’s no reason to rush leaving school. I love being a Tar Heel and love playing for Carolina and Coach Williams.

Berry, the Most Outstanding Player from this season’s Final Four, averaged 14.7 points, 3.1 rebounds and 3.6 rebounds per game as a junior.

The 6-foot floor general will likely open next season as not only a preseason All-American but perhaps a favorite for national player of the year. Berry will join Theo Pinson as the returning starter for the Tar Heels. North Carolina was pegged as a top-5 team in an early preseason poll by NBC Sports. While Berry’s anticipated return is a big reason why, that ranking also hinges on the decision of Bradley, a 6-foot-10 forward who will be projected as a breakout player if he chooses to return for his sophomore season.

Prospects have until May 24 to withdraw from the NBA Draft.

2017 NBA Draft Early Entry List: Who is staying and who is going?

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RETURNING TO SCHOOL

Jalen Adams, UConn
Grayson Allen, Duke (story)
Tyus Battle, Syracuse
Joel Berry II, North Carolina (story)
Marques Bolden, Duke
Mikal Bridges (story)
Miles Bridges, Michigan State (story)
Bruce Brown, Miami
Jalen Brunson (story)
Jeffery Carroll, Oklahoma State (story)
Bonzie Colson, Notre Dame
Marcus Foster, Creighton
Devonte’ Graham, Kansas (story)
B.J. Johnson, La Salle
E.C. Matthews, Rhode Island
Shake Milton, SMU
Chimezie Metu, USC
Elijah Stewart, USC
Allonzo Trier, Arizona (story)
Robert Williams, Texas A&M (story)

DECLARING, SIGNING WITH AN AGENT

Bam Adebayo, Kentucky (story)
Jarrett Allen, Texas (story)
Ike Anigbogu, UCLA (story)
O.G. Anunoby, Indiana (story)
Dwayne Bacon, Florida State (story)
Lonzo Ball, UCLA (story)
Jordan Bell, Oregon (story)
Antonio Blakeney, LSU (story)
John Collins, Wake Forest
Zach Collins, Gonzaga (story)
Tyler Dorsey, Oregon (story)
P.J. Dozier, South Carolina (story)
Jawun Evans, Oklahoma State (story)
De’Aaron Fox, Kentucky (story)
Markelle Fultz, Washington (story)
Harry Giles III, Duke (story)
Isaac Humphries, Kentucky (story)
Jonathan Isaac, Florida State (story)
Justin Jackson, North Carolina (story)
Jaylen Johnson, Louisville
Luke Kennard, Duke (story)
T.J. Leaf, UCLA (story)
Tyler Lydon, Syracuse (story)
Lauri Markkanen, Arizona (story)
Malik Monk, Kentucky (story)
Austin Nichols, Virginia
Justin Patton, Creighton (story)
L.J. Peak, Georgetown
Ivan Rabb, California (story)
Xavier Rathan-Mayes, Florida State
Devin Robinson, Florida
Kobi Simmons, Arizona (story)
Dennis Smith Jr., N.C. State (story)
Edmond Sumner, Xavier (story)
Jayson Tatum, Duke (story)
Melo Trimble, Maryland (story)
Nigel Williams-Goss, Gonzaga (story)

DECLARING WITHOUT AN AGENT

Shaqquan Aaron, USC
Jaylen Adams, St. Bonaventure
Deng Adel, Louisville
Jashaun Agosto, LIU-Brooklyn
Rawle Alkins, Arizona
Mark Alstork, Wright State
Jaylen Barford, Arkansas
Joel Berry II, North Carolina
James Blackmon, Indiana
Trevon Bluiett, Xavier
Tony Bradley, North Carolina
Dillon Brooks, Oregon
Thomas Bryant, Indiana (story)
Rodney Bullock, Providence
Khadeen Carrington, Seton Hall
Jevon Carter, West Virginia (story)
Jason Chartouny, Fordham
Donte Clark, UMass (story)
Chance Comanche, Arizona
Angel Delgado, Seton Hall
Hamidou Diallo, Kentucky (story)
Vince Edwards, Purdue
John Egbunu, Florida
Jon Elmore, Marshall
Obi Enechionyia, Temple
Drew Eubanks, Oregon State
Tacko Fall, UCF
Brandon Goodwin, FGCU
Isaac Haas, Purdue
Aaron Holiday, UCLA
Chandler Hutchinson, Boise State
Frank Jackson, Duke (story)
B.J. Johnson, La Salle
Darin Johnson, CSUN
Robert Johnson, Indiana
Andrew Jones, Texas
Kerem Kanter, Green Bay
Marcus Keene, Central Michigan
Braxton Key, Alabama
Kyle Kuzma, Utah
William Lee, UAB
Daryl Macon, Arkansas
Yante Maten, Georgia
Markis McDuffie, Wichita State
MiKyle McIntosh, Illinois State
Donovan Mitchell, Louisville
Eric Mika, BYU
Johnathan Motley, Baylor (story)
Svi Mykhailiuk, Kansas (story)
Semi Ojeleye, SMU
Cam Oliver, Nevada
Randy Onwuasor, Southern Utah
Theo Pinson, North Carolina
Maverick Rowan, N.C. State
Corey Sanders, Rutgers
Jaaron Simmons, Ohio
Jaren Sina, George Washington
Zach Smith, Texas Tech
Elijah Stewart, USC
Caleb Swanigan (story)
Stevie Thompson, Oregon State
Trevor Thompson, Ohio State
Mo Wagner, Michigan
Tevonn Walker, Valparaiso
Thomas Welsh, UCLA
Thomas Wilder, Western Michigan
Johnathan Williams III, Gonzaga
D.J. Wilson, Michigan
Omer Yurtseven, N.C. State
Craig Victor, LSU
Donte Grantham, Clemson

YET TO DECIDE

Keita Bates-Diop, Ohio State
Jacob Evans, Cincinnati
Matthew Fisher-Davis, Vanderbilt
Jessie Govan, Georgetown
Donta Hall, Alabama
Ethan Happ, Wisconsin
D.J. Hogg, Texas A&M
Justin Jackson, Maryland
V.J. King, Louisville
Dedric Lawson, Memphis
Anas Mahmoud, Louisville
De’Anthony Melton, USC
Jerome Robinson, Boston College
Khadeen Carrington, Seton Hall
Khadeem Latin, Oklahoma
Kamau Stokes, Kansas State
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