Rashad McCants celebrates

Former North Carolina guard Rashad McCants says he took phony classes to remain eligible


While the allegations of academic fraud within the North Carolina athletic department has received publicity over the last two years, there wasn’t a great deal done from an NCAA standpoint. In light of allegations made by a former North Carolina basketball player Friday, the question now is whether or not the NCAA will revisit the situation.

In a story written by Steve Delsohn of ESPN’s Outside the Lines, former North Carolina basketball player Rashad McCants stated that he took phony classes in order to remain eligible, including four during the spring of his junior season. That year North Carolina won the national title, and McCants made the Dean’s list during the spring semester by getting A’s in all four courses he took.

Those courses were part of a “paper-class” system, which according to McCants meant that only requirement was to write a term paper at the end of the semester (there was no requirement to attend class). Also discussed were McCants’ academic struggles during that 2004-05 season, with the former player stating that head coach Roy Williams knew about the situation.

McCants said he was headed toward ineligibility during the championship season because he had failed algebra and psychology, which accounted for half of his credits, in the fall of 2004. He had two A’s in AFAM classes in addition to the F’s. He said coach Roy Williams informed him of his academic troubles during a meeting ahead of the spring semester.

“There was a slight panic on my part … [he] said, you know, we’re going to be able to figure out how to make it happen, but you need to buckle down on your academics.”

He said Williams told him “we’re going to be able to change a class from, you know, your summer session class and swap it out with the class that you failed, just so the GPA could reflect that you are in good standing.”

According to the story all four of the classes McCants took during the Spring 2005 semester were in the school’s African and African-American Studies department, which was revealed to have hosted a number of phony classes set up to keep athletes eligible. UNC athletic director Bubba Cunningham issued a statement to Outside the Lines, encouraging McCants to speak with the independent investigator the school hired to look into the academic fraud issues (Kenneth Wainstein).

“It is disappointing any time a student is dissatisfied with his or her experience. I welcome the opportunity to speak with Rashad McCants about returning to UNC to continue his academic career — just as we have welcomed many former student-athletes interested in completing their degrees.

“The university hired former federal prosecutor Kenneth Wainstein in January to conduct an independent investigation into past academic and athletic irregularities. While these are the first allegations we have heard from Mr. McCants, I encourage him to speak with Mr. Wainstein. …

“I have gotten to know some of Mr. McCants’ teammates, and I know that claims about their academic experience have affected them deeply. They are adamant that they had a different experience at UNC-Chapel Hill than has been portrayed by Mr. McCants and others.”

Interestingly enough, some who played at rival schools have chimed in on McCants’ interview and the reactions have been interesting to say the least. Instead of celebrating the hit that North Carolina could take with this news, they’ve questioned McCants’ motivation for making these statements. One such person is former NC State guard Julius Hodge.

McCants has also been criticized by former North Carolina players, who have openly questioned his credibility.

The question now is whether or not McCants’ interview motivates the NCAA to take another look at the academic situation in the North Carolina athletic department, with the football program receiving the greatest punishment (there were also agent issues within that program) at the time.

Illinois’ injury woes continue as starting center needs knee surgery

George Niang,Abdel Nader,Mike Thorne, Jr.
AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser
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Illinois suffered another blow in what has already turned out to be a brutal season.

Mike Thorne is expected to miss the rest of the season after tearing his meniscus. He reportedly underwent surgery on Monday to repair the injury.

Thorne, a transfer from Charlotte, was starting at center for the Illini and doing a good job of it as well. He was averaging 13.4 points and 8.4 boards, although Illinois has started off the season 3-4.

The reason for that slow start has mainly been those injuries. Tracy Abrams is already out for the season after tearing his achilles, and the Illini training room looked like a M.A.S.H. unit. Kendrick Nunn just returned two games ago from surgery to repair a torn thumb ligament. LeRon Black is still getting back to speed after offseason knee surgery. Jaylon Tate is back after dislocating a finger. Jalen Coleman-Lands was slowed by a stress fracture.

John Groce entered this season on the hot seat, and dealing with all of these injuries certainly isn’t helping his cause.

NEW PODCAST: Recapping Feast Week

Kris Dunn
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We talk about a lot of stuff of the podcast today, mainly because a lot of stuff happened since we last spoke with you all.

For starters, we need to discuss the ‘realness’ of Syracuse and Xavier. Are they both truly top 15 teams, or do they just have top 15 resumes? We also dive into Chris Mack’s epic troll-job of Dayton at the Advocare Invitational final.

Other topics we touched on: Whether or not Scott is ever going to apologize to Wayne Selden, Wichita State’s tournament hopes, Texas A&M and whether we’d take Ben Simmons, Kris Dunn or Denzel Valentine today.

As always, you can subscribe to the podcast in iTunes right here. It’s the quickest way to get access on your cell phone or tablet.