Ed O'Bannon Jr.

NCAA won’t punish active players who receive payouts from Electronic Arts settlement


With it being announced last week that the plaintiffs in the Ed O’Bannon lawsuit and Electronic Arts reached an agreement on a settlement, with the video game maker due to pay $40 million, some wondered whether or not current college athletes would be able to receive money without concern of being penalized by the NCAA. The NCAA answered that question in a brief statement, noting that it will not punish current college athletes who receive a portion of the settlement.

“First, under no circumstances will we allow the proposed agreement between EA and plaintiff’s lawyers to negatively impact the eligibility of any student-athlete…not one will miss a practice or a game if this settlement is approved by the court,” the statement read. “This proposed settlement does not equate to payment of current student-athletes for their athletic performance, regardless of how it is being publicly characterized.

“Second, the real benefactors of this settlement are the lawyers, who could pocket more than $15 million.”

While that last sentence may be true, it comes off as catty and is one that whoever wrote the statement could have done without. Was there anything the NCAA would have lost by not stating that the lawyers are in line to benefit the most from the multimillion dollar settlement? Probably not.

The NCAA, the lone remaining defendant in the Ed O’Bannon lawsuit after EA and the Collegiate Licensing Company agreed to settle with the plaintiffs, will look to win a suit that could have a major impact on the slate of collegiate athletics that will begin on June 9 (Monday).

As for whether or not current college basketball players could be in line to benefit from the settlement, sixth-year seniors may be the only ones with a shot. The final college basketball game produced, NCAA Basketball 10, was released in the fall of 2009.

Illinois’ injury woes continue as starting center needs knee surgery

George Niang,Abdel Nader,Mike Thorne, Jr.
AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser
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Illinois suffered another blow in what has already turned out to be a brutal season.

Mike Thorne is expected to miss the rest of the season after tearing his meniscus. He reportedly underwent surgery on Monday to repair the injury.

Thorne, a transfer from Charlotte, was starting at center for the Illini and doing a good job of it as well. He was averaging 13.4 points and 8.4 boards, although Illinois has started off the season 3-4.

The reason for that slow start has mainly been those injuries. Tracy Abrams is already out for the season after tearing his achilles, and the Illini training room looked like a M.A.S.H. unit. Kendrick Nunn just returned two games ago from surgery to repair a torn thumb ligament. LeRon Black is still getting back to speed after offseason knee surgery. Jaylon Tate is back after dislocating a finger. Jalen Coleman-Lands was slowed by a stress fracture.

John Groce entered this season on the hot seat, and dealing with all of these injuries certainly isn’t helping his cause.

NEW PODCAST: Recapping Feast Week

Kris Dunn
AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill
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We talk about a lot of stuff of the podcast today, mainly because a lot of stuff happened since we last spoke with you all.

For starters, we need to discuss the ‘realness’ of Syracuse and Xavier. Are they both truly top 15 teams, or do they just have top 15 resumes? We also dive into Chris Mack’s epic troll-job of Dayton at the Advocare Invitational final.

Other topics we touched on: Whether or not Scott is ever going to apologize to Wayne Selden, Wichita State’s tournament hopes, Texas A&M and whether we’d take Ben Simmons, Kris Dunn or Denzel Valentine today.

As always, you can subscribe to the podcast in iTunes right here. It’s the quickest way to get access on your cell phone or tablet.