ACC to experiment with a 30-second shot clock

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Might we finally be seeing change coming to college basketball’s 35-second shot clock?

Among the items that were discussed at the ACC’s spring meetings this week was a reduction of the shot clock to 30 seconds, and it has been decided that the conference will use a 30-second shot clock experimentally during exhibition games this season.

“Our coaches and ADs both felt it would be an enhancement to the game in today’s world,” ACC commissioner John Swofford said, according to a report from ESPN. “It adds more possessions and potentially would speed up the game.”

Reducing the shot clock has been a topic that’s been up for debate for a couple of years now, as college hoops has the longest shot clock at any level of the game where one exists. The NBA has a 24-second clock. Women’s basketball has a 30-second clock in college and a 24-second clock in the NBA. FIBA uses a 24-second clock. At the high school level, shot clocks are not required by all states, but the Nike EYBL uses a 30-second shot clock.

The theory is that a shorter shot clock would increase possessions in a game and, thus, increase scoring. The ACC is coming off of a season where they were arguably the most boring conference in the country, averaging less than 62 possessions per game, the lowest number in the country.

But that doesn’t mean there’s going to be strong support across the country for a change.

“Shot clock was discussed at some length in the rules committee – when I thew it out in the NABC board meeting, there was surprisingly little discussion about it and surprisingly little support,” Belmont head coach Rick Byrd, who doubles as the chairman of the NCAA men’s basketball rules committee, told last week. “No one in that room ventured forth and said ‘We need this, this is something we really need to do at all,’ and the opportunity was there. We will certainly revisit it next May, but I don’t think it’s as much a frontburner issue as others expect it to be.”

Colorado’s Tory Miller reprimanded by Pac-12 after biting opponent

Dusan Ristic, Tory Miller
AP Photo
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Colorado sophomore forward Tory Miller has been reprimanded by the Pac-12 and he also apologized for biting Air Force’s Hayden Graham earlier this week.

During Colorado’s win over Air Force on Wednesday, Miller was assessed a Flagrant 2 Dead Ball Technical Foul and ejected with 12:25 left in the second half after biting Graham during a loose ball.

In a release from the Pac-12, they announced reprimanding Miller, but he will not be suspended.

“All of our student-athletes must adhere to the Pac-12’s Standards of Conduct and Sportsman-ship,” Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott said in the release. “Regardless of Mr. Miller’s frustration and emotion, such behavior is unacceptable and he is being appropriately reprimanded.”

Miller also released his apology in the same release.

“I would like to apologize for my actions during the Air Force game. I would like to apologize to Hayden Graham, Air Force, my teammates and fans. It was a heat of the moment thing. I’m an emotional player, but I let my emotions get the best of me. I will use this as a learning experience and focus on helping my teammates and respecting my opponents for the rest of the season and beyond,” Miller said.

For Miller to not be suspended for this is good news for him and Colorado since he won’t miss any additional action, but did the Pac-12 make the right decision on this?


Michigan State’s Tum Tum Nairn battling foot injury

Lourawls Nairn Jr.
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Michigan State has climbed on the back of star senior wing Denzel Valentine early in the season but they’ll undoubtedly need more help as the season goes on if they want to sustain their current top-5 ranking. One of the keys to the Spartans could be the on-going health of sophomore point guard Lourawls ‘Tum Tum’ Nairn, who is battling a foot injury.

According to a report from Kyle Austin of, Nairn has been putting on a protective boot the last few months to help battle plantar fasciitis as the guard has been playing in practices and hasn’t had his minutes reduced in games.

The injury looked like it was hurting Nairn’s early-season play, but he’s been very good in two games at the Wooden Legacy in California this week, so it could be that he’s getting more used to playing through the pain of the injury.

If Nairn is healthy and capable of contributing, he’s a huge boost to Michigan State because he’s one of the fastest players in college basketball and an additional ball handler on the floor. Through six games so far this season, Nairn is averaging 5.3 points and 4.7 assists per game as he’s been one of the team’s best distributors.

Plantar fasciitis can be a tough injury to fight through, so we’ll have to see if this affects Nairn as the season goes along.