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Adam Silver says raising NBA’s age limit a top priority


It’s not a secret that Adam Silver has made it a priority in his first year as the NBA’s commissioner to push the league’s age limit back to 20 years old.

And now he has the backing of a majority of the NBA’s owners.

That’s what Silver said after exiting two days of owners meetings. The league will not be changing the age limit for the 2014-2015 season — they cannot start negotiating until the NBA Player’s Union has named an executive director — it’s not crazy to think that the one-and-done era in college basketball may be over with by the 2016 NBA Draft.

What’s interesting is that Silver reached out to NCAA president Mark Emmert and inviting him into the meetings, an effort to discuss ways to make college a more effective and fair development system for the NBA. Topics ranged from reducing the shot clock at the college level to full cost-of-attendance scholarships to more financial incentives to remain an “amateur” for longer.

“If we’re going to be successful in raising the age from 19 to 20, part and parcel in those negotiations goes to the treatment of players on those college campuses and closing the gap between what their scholarships cover and their expenses,” Silver told Brian Windhorst of ESPN.com. “We haven’t looked specifically at creating a financial incentive for them to stay in college. That’s been an option that has been raised over the years, but that’s not something that is on the table right now.”

PBT: Kurt Helin’s look at the two-and-through from the NBA’s perspective

One theory that has even reportedly been pitched would be to require a player to be three years removed from high school graduation to enter the draft, but to raise the NBA D-League’s pay beyond the maximum of $28,000, making it a viable alternative to college.

Whatever the case may be, raising the age limit makes perfect business sense for the NBA. We’ve been over this time and time again, but the longer the NBA is allowed to wait to draft a prospect, the better feel they are going to have for just what kind of player that prospect is going to be down the road. Two years of scouting at the college level — and the chance to see how the athlete develops between his freshman and sophomore seasons — would be valuable information to have.

It also reduces the amount of time that the NBA’s owners will have to pay to develop these prospects. The way the system is currently set up, the elite prospects — the guys that can go one-and-done — might need a year or two in the NBA before they are ready to be contributors. The NBA funds that by paying their salaries. Drafting a player a year later in their development will save owners millions in salary. If you can’t see why that is a no-brainer for the NBA’s money men than I hope you never open your own business.

On the college side of things, it’s tough to really know just what kind of impact this move will have. The way the system is currently set up, it may drive more players to skip college and turn pro in one of basketball’s minor leagues. It may turn Kentucky into a team that would make the Playoffs in the Eastern Conference. It may result in the NCAA finally realizing their arcane amateurism rules are absurd. At this point, there is such a push for a structural change in how we view student-athletes at the highest level of men’s basketball, it’s tough to predict just how that will play out.

But whatever the case may be, it sounds like the NBA’s age limit will be 20 sooner rather than later.


AUDIO: Rick Pitino discusses allegations, future at Louisville

Rick Pitino
Associated Press
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Thursday afternoon marked the first time since Friday that Louisville head coach Rick Pitino commented on the controversy that has taken his program by storm. Speaking with Terry Meiners of 840 WHAS in Louisville, Pitino discussed the escort scandal, what could have possibly led former staffer Andre McGee down the path he’s alleged to have taken in Katina Powell’s book and his future at Louisville.

The interview began with Meiners asking Pitino if it changed his thinking as to whether or not he needed to resign, which (as one would expect) Pitino shot down. Also discussed was the statement released by school president Dr. James Ramsey, which expressed support for athletic director Tom Jurich but did not mention Pitino at all.

“Well I can’t answer that, Terry,” Pitino said when asked why he wasn’t mentioned in the statement. “Twenty-six years ago Kentucky brought me in to make the program compliant to NCAA rules. (Then-Kentucky president) Dr. (David) Roselle and (then Kentucky athletic director) C.M. Newton thought I was the guy to come in and change around the images, change around the culture and add a lot of discipline to the program. And I did that.

“And then I came here to the University of Louisville, and if someone was five seconds late or not early consequences would be paid from a disciplinary standpoint,” Pitino continued. “This is obviously not a person being late, this is not about a person (not) working hard. This is about things that are very disgusting, things that turn my stomach, things that keep me up without sleeping.

“But unfortunately, I had no knowledge of any of this and don’t believe in it. It’s sickening to me, the whole thing. But I’m thinking of my 13 players, I’m thinking of our program, and I’m sorry that Dr. Ramsey did not think enough to mention me but that’s something I cannot control.”

Below is audio of the full interview, which ran just over 17 minutes in length.

Boise State loses guard Harwell to torn ACL

Leon Rice
Associated Press
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Expected to be one of the favorites in the Mountain West this season, Boise State’s perimeter ranks have shrunk by one player due to injury. Thursday it was reported by the Idaho Statesman that freshman guard Malek Harwell will redshirt after suffering a torn ACL in practice. Along with fellow freshman Paris Austin, Harwell is expected to be a key part of the Broncos’ future beyond the upcoming season.

Now, instead of competing with an experienced backcourt that includes four redshirt seniors, Harwell will work to get his knee back to full strength for the 2016-17 season.

Among the guards who will play significant minutes this season are Anthony Drmic, who took a medical redshirt last season, Montigo Alford, Mikey Thompson and grad transfer Lonnie Jackson (Boston College). Chandler Hutchison, who started in Boise State’s final 18 games of the 2014-15 season as a freshman, will also compete for playing time.