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Defense lets down No. 10 Stanford in Sweet 16 loss

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Prior to the start of the NCAA tournament last week few people gave No. 10 Stanford a chance of advancing out of the Round of 64. With No. 7 New Mexico having won the Mountain West tournament and No. 2 Kansas without the services of Joel Embiid, much of the Sweet 16 talk centered on the Lobos prior to their matchup with the Cardinal. But it would be Stanford who emerged from St. Louis, and their defense in both games was a major reason as to why.

After limiting New Mexico to 36.5% shooting from the field the Cardinal were even better against Kansas, as the Jayhawks shot just 32.8% from the field and committed 14 turnovers. With their interior tandem of Stefan Nastic and Dwight Powell and a talented combo guard in Chasson Randle, Johnny Dawkins’ team seemed to have the pieces needed to make life difficult for No. 11 Dayton.

However things didn’t work out that way for Stanford, as Dayton used quality ball movement to find open shots throughout the night in their 82-72 victory.

MORE: Dayton earns first Elite Eight appearance in 30 years

Stanford tried the 2-3 zone look that gave Kansas fits on Sunday, and Dayton responded by making six three-pointers in the first half and scoring 42 points. And in the second half with Stanford going back to its man-to-man the Flyers were able to break the Cardinal down off the dribble, resulting in multiple opportunities at the basket. Dayton scored 22 points in the paint in the second half, and for the game the Flyers made 48.3% of its field goal attempts.

Stanford didn’t defend at the level they did against either New Mexico or Kansas, and the disadvantageous match-ups certainly factored into that. But the defense wasn’t the only reason why Stanford fell short of reaching the Elite Eight, as Randle was anything but efficient offensively.

Randle scored a team-high 21 points but did so on 21 field goal attempts, making eight. Add in his three assists and five turnovers, and the player entrusted with running the show since Aaron Bright was lost early in the season due to injury struggled at the worst possible time. Add in Stefan Nastic picking up his fourth foul just over six minutes into the second half after taking advantage of his size against Dayton’s front court, and the Cardinal found themselves fighting uphill the rest of the way.

While the finish to the season was a disappointing one for Stanford, that shouldn’t take away from what they were able to accomplish last week in St. Louis. But this time of year one off night leads to doom on most occasions, and that proved to be the case for the Cardinal.

Nigel Hayes’ comment on basketball brands hits on greater point

Wisconsin's Nigel Hayes (10) drives on Ohio State's Jae'Sean Tate (1) during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016, in Madison, Wis. Hayes had a team-high 21 points in Wisconsin's 79-68 win. (AP Photo/Andy Manis)
AP Photo/Andy Manis
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Much is made about the ball when it comes to how the sport of basketball is played and rightfully so, as the ball is the most important piece of equipment. Different brands have different characteristics, and with college basketball programs being able to pick the ball they use for home games there are adjustments to be made during the season.

Wisconsin will play at No. 2 Maryland Saturday, meaning that in the days leading up to the game the Badgers needed to get used to the Under Armour basketball. The brand became a conversation point in the aftermath of Maryland’s win over No. 4 Iowa last month, with the Hawkeyes (while not blaming the ball for their loss) made note of the differences between the Under Armour ball and the Nike ball they use for their home games.

Thursday Wisconsin forward Nigel Hayes offered up his observations on the basketball while also pointing out (albeit sarcastically) the goal of intercollegiate athletics.

“It’s definitely different,” Hayes said. “Personally, we don’t like it too much. I don’t like the Under Armour ball whatsoever. But that’s the way this amateur sports league is set up. We’re supposed to be having fun, but all the money is in these basketballs that colleges play with. But it’s an amateur sport, we’re just here for fun. It’s not really that serious. So I guess any ball should be OK.

“Maybe we should have a universal ball like the NBA. You don’t go to the Clippers’ stadium and play with a Nike and then go to Golden State and play with a Rawlings. But in this amateur sport of college, where money isn’t the goal — it’s the student education and experience that you get — we play with a million different basketballs.”

Hayes makes a good point here, and in regards to the NBA all hell would break loose under similar circumstances (remember the leather vs. microfiber composite controversy in 2006?). If these games are solely about fun and the college experience, wouldn’t having one ball used by all schools better fit that mission? This isn’t the biggest of deals when it comes to “amateur” athletics, as different basketball brands have been used for years.

But Hayes was able to take this situation and work it into the discussion of the goals of intercollegiate athletics. Is it about the experience? Or does the ability to profit, be it through a minor move such as using a particular ball or the more impactful step of moving from one conference to another, take precedence? Given the shifts that have occurred in college sports in recent years, it’s quite apparent that the search for additional revenue streams has won out.

Hayes did note that neither he nor his teammates would make excuses, saying that the team would simple “have to get used to” the unfamiliar basketball according to the Wisconsin State Journal. In the end, this was a good use of sarcasm by Hayes to make a greater point about the collegiate athletics machine he and his teammates are but minor parts of.

Marquette fan sends Providence money for missed free throw

Providence's Kris Dunn reacts to his shot during the first half of an NCAA basketball game against Villanova, Sunday, Jan. 24, 2016, in Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Chris Szagola)
AP Photo/Chris Szagola
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It goes without saying that sports can inspire some interesting promises, from players and coaches guaranteeing victory to fans making statements that hinge on the outcome of a particular game or play (see: tattoos celebrating a team’s triumphs before they’ve even won the game in question). For one Marquette fan, the need for Providence’s Kris Dunn to miss a free throw during Wednesday night’s game (which Marquette won in overtime) inspired him to make a promise that he intended to keep.

Jamey Schilling took the approach of yelling that he’d pay Dunn $10 if he missed the free throw. Sure enough Dunn missed the shot, and Schilling made good on his promise. But with players themselves unable to receive such funds due to NCAA rules, Schilling sent the check to the Providence athletic department.

Schilling’s gesture did not go unnoticed by Marquette either, as the school sent him a gift card to use in the Marquette Spirit Shop.

H/T For The Win