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No. 3 Creighton sloughs off UL-Lafayette, McDermott moves up NCAA scoring list

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For about fourteen minutes in the second half against Louisiana-Lafayette, Creighton’s Doug McDermott did not score a basket. It seems incredible that a player nicknamed ‘Dougie McBuckets’ would be held scoreless for that long a time-frame, but ULL decided the way to stop the Bluejays’ insanely efficient offense was to concentrate on McDermott and allow his teammates to carry the team’s offensive load. It somewhat worked — with about twelve minutes remaining in the game, ULL led 50-46 — but McDermott was able to operate within the different defensive looks engineered to stop him, finish the game with 30 points, and help Creighton win their opening round game, 76-66.

This win is significant for two reasons. One, McDermott is always options 1a, 1b, 1c, and 1d on any scouting report, but UL-Lafayette attempted a strategy many others have tried (but few succeeded) against CU this season: plug the paint, shrink the halfcourt, and make the other Bluejays score. ULL began their run while McDermott was in the midst of his scoring drought, and CU struggled to find offensive rhythm among the other four players on the court.

But then Ethan Wragge erupted — the sharpshooting forward shot four of eight from beyond the arc (he made three in a row at one point in the final twenty minutes), and his scoring presence infused the other Bluejays with a sense of relief. It was noticeable how much freer the rest of the team played once Wragge began connecting from deep.

We must note that McDermott is now fifth all-time on the NCAA’s career scoring list, passing Harry ‘Machine Gun’ Kelly of Texas Southern to enter the top five. To reach the top spot, and bypass Pete Maravich, McDermott now has to average 112 points per game (and win the national title).

The second reason this first round win is crucial is that the team succeeded when their shooting was well-off. The squad made 61.2 percent of their twos and 39.1 percent of their threes — both outstanding percentages for any team not named Creighton — but there were times when CU appeared stagnant and struggled to connect, yet they somehow managed to weather ULL’s shifting defense and win.

Although his road to Arlington has been derailed, the loss gave the nation a chance to watch ULL guard Elfrid Payton, a player who was on the U19 team last summer but who is still somehow unknown. Payton’s defense on McDermott managed to slow the forward a bit, and while he was pressing to keep his team in the contest — both Shawn Long and Bryant Mbamalu were either in foul trouble (Long) or not find the bucket (Mbamalu) — he still finished with 24 points.

Creighton next takes on Baylor, a game that should be an interesting match-up for the ‘Jays. Baylor’s zone will likely be easily disassembled by the constantly moving Creighton offense, so does Scott Drew stick with zone? Or does he alternate man and zone? Another intriguing subplot is Creighton’s struggles on the defensive glass. They managed to grab 83.7 percent of the Ragin’ Cajuns’ misses, but ULL was able to secure some crucial additional possessions. Baylor is one of the nation’s best on the offensive glass, and that will likely be a focal point of their gameplan against Creighton.

VIDEOS: Rhode Island, Maryland exchange heated words in Cancun

Dan Hurley
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No. 2 Maryland finally found their rhythm on Wednesday night, blowing out a good Rhode Island team, 86-63, in the finals of the Cancun Challenge.

Melo Trimble and Rasheed Sulaimon combined for 34 points and eight assists on 13-for-14 shooting and Robert Carter added 15 points, nine boards, three assists and three blocks. Peak Maryland, which is what we saw tonight, is really dangerous.

But Peak Maryland wasn’t the story after the game, as tempers flared in the waning minutes.

It started when Maryland coach Mark Turgeon called a timeout with less than two minutes remaining. Jake Layman had just hit a three to put Maryland up by 24 points and Turgeon wanted to get his walk-ons in the game. Hurley said to the Maryland bench, “We’ll see you again, boy,” according to Inside Maryland Sports, which prompted this reaction from Turgeon:

After the game, the two teams had to be separated in layup lines. According to reports from IMS and from the Baltimore Sun, Hurley was cursing at Maryland players as he was shaking their hands after the game. According Doug Gottlieb, who called the game for CBS Sports Network, Trimble said that the Rhode Island team wanted to “fight us”:

Wayne Selden stars as Kansas wins the title in Maui

Wayne Selden Jr., Jeff Roberson
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The last time we wrote about Wayne Selden in this space, it was my colleague Scott Phillips who questioned, after a poor performance in the Champions Classic, whether or not Selden is capable of bring a primary scorer for a team with NCAA title aspirations.

At the time, it wasn’t an unfair question to ask.

Selden is a former top 15 recruit. He is a guy who was expected to go one-and-done that played poorly in the first big game of his third year on campus. But after three days it Maui, it appears that the old Wayne Selden is gone.

[MORE: Kansas got Cheick Diallo news today]

He capped an MVP performance in the Maui Invitational with 25 points and seven boards on 8-for-11 shooting as the No. 5 Kansas Jayhawks knocked off No. 19 Vanderbilt, 70-63, in the title game. Selden was terrific for the entire weekend, averaging 21.5 points in the two games against Division I competition and shooting 12-for-17 from beyond the arc in the three game tournament.

It was the best that we’ve seen Selden play during his Jayhawk career, and it came in a game the Jayhawks desperately needed it. Vanderbilt is a damn good team. They’re ranked 19th, which may actually be too low, and they seem to clearly be the biggest challenger to Kentucky in the SEC. They jumped out to a double-digit lead on Kansas in the first half as the Jayhawks seemed to be sleep-walking early in the game.

Enter Selden. He drilled three threes in the first half and scored 13 of the 26 Jayhawk points to keep them close. In other words, he played like a star on a night Kansas desperately needed someone to step up and play like a star. Remember: this is a dude that had enough talent and potential in high school to be considered a McDonald’s All-American and a potential lottery pick. The ability is there:

(That move is filthy.)

The question has always been whether or not he is capable of putting it all together, of being the guy that can be relied upon to make the big play in the big moment, to carry a team with title aspirations.

And to be fair, the jury is still out in that regard. Are we just going to ignore those four free throws he clanged down the stretch?

But seeing Selden have this kind of performance in a game like this against a team that is this good is unquestionably a positive for Kansas moving forward.