The Secondary Break: Thursday’s Links

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McCaffery showed empathy for Iowa fan before outpouring for son (CBS Sports)
Iowa head coach Fran McCaffery coached Wednesday night’s game against Tennessee just hours after his 13-year old son underwent surgery to remove a tumor from his thyroid. Moments such as that put games in perspective, and it’s something the coach has done before in order to help a family who lost a young child to a heart ailment.

The Game that Saved March Madness (Sports Illustrated)
On March 19, 1989, Princeton faced Georgetown in a game many expected to follow the usual script when it comes to 1 vs. 16 games. Princeton, simply happy to be in the 64-team field, would take their beating from the Big East juggernaut and we’d soon forget about the Tigers. But that didn’t happen with the Tigers getting two chances to win the game, only to have Alonzo Mourning reject both attempts. And it’s a game that still has an impact to this day.

Women’s NCAA tournament graduation rates best men (NBC Sports)
Every spring one topic that tends to come up is how well programs are doing in the classroom, and thanks to the APR that progress now impacts postseason eligibility. A study released by UCF’s Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport revealed that women’s teams are graduating their student-athletes at an 87% rate, with the men behind at 72%. And those aren’t even the numbers that the researchers found most disturbing either.

Villanova wants Bell to go in style – with wins (CSN Philly)
Villanova senior wing James Bell has been an important leader for the Big East regular season champions. And with this being the case his teammates, many of whom are expected back next season, would like to do nothing more than make sure that Bell and his classmates Tony Chennault and Nick McMahon enjoy a deep NCAA tournament run.

Jahii Carson’s legacy, ASU basketball future to be shaped by one game (Arizona Republic)
Arizona State’s game against Texas on Thursday is a big one for obvious reasons, with the loser seeing its NCAA tournament experience cut short after one game. But for the Sun Devils the outcome will likely impact how the program is viewed by fans starved for a consistent winner. And with Jahii Carson, Jordan Bachynski and Jermaine Marshall all moving on afterwards, there will be changes for Herb Sendek to make from a personnel standpoint.

Youthful Kentucky ready to “do something crazy” (Louisville Courier-Journal)
Postseason play can offer teams that haven’t performed as well as they would have hoped a second life so to speak, because getting hot at the right time can result in a trip to the Final Four or maybe a national title. That’s the position Kentucky finds itself in, and they’ll begin NCAA tournament play against nine-seed Kansas State on Friday. And according to Jay Bilas, the Wildcats’ seed may be too low.

Wisconsin’s Frank Kaminsky his own biggest critic (Chicago Tribune)
Wisconsin forward Frank Kaminsky has been one of the nation’s most improved players, earning first team All-Big Ten honors after being a role player a season ago. One reason for the 7-footer’s growth is the fact that Kaminsky is his own biggest critic, working to keep that edge and continue to improve for a team with designs on reaching the Final Four for the first time since 2000.

VIDEO: Jay-Z’s nephew posterizes nation’s No. 1 recruit Marvin Bagley III

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Nahziah Carter is an unsigned 6-foot-6 wing in the Class of 2017.

He’s also Jay-Z’s nephew, and he just so happened to posterize Marvin Bagley III — the clearcut No. 1 prospect in the Class of 2018 — while Hova was in the stands watching him.

NCAA denies extra-year request by NC State guard Henderson

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RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The NCAA has denied North Carolina State guard Terry Henderson’s request for another year of eligibility.

Henderson announced the decision Friday in a statement issued by the school.

The Raleigh native played two seasons at West Virginia before transferring to N.C. State and redshirting in 2014-15. He played for only 7 minutes of the following season before suffering a season-ending ankle injury.

As a redshirt senior in 2016-17, he was the team’s second-leading scorer at 13.8 points per game and made a team-best 78 3-pointers.

Henderson called it “an honor and privilege” to play in his hometown.

SMU gets transfer in Georgetown’s Akoy Agau

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SMU pulled in a frontcourt player in Georgetown transfer Akoy Agau, a source confirmed to NBCSports.com. Agau is immediately eligible for next season as a graduate transfer.

The 6-foot-8 Agau started his career at Louisville before transferring to Georgetown after one season. Spending two seasons with the Hoyas, Agau was limited to 11 minutes in his first season due to injuries. He averaged 4.5 points and 4.3 rebounds per game last season.

Coming out of high school, Agau was a four-star prospect but he’s never lived up to that billing in-part because of injuries. Now, Agau gets one more chance to make a difference as he’s hoping to help replace some departed pieces like Ben Moore and Semi Ojeleye.

South Carolina loses big man Sedee Keita to transfer

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South Carolina big man Sedee Keita will transfer from the program, he announced on Friday.

The 6-foot-9 Keita was once regarded as a top-100 national prospect in the Class of 2016, but he never found consistent minutes with the Gamecocks for last season’s Final Four team.

Keita appeared in 29 games and averaged 1.1 points and 2.0 rebounds per game while shooting 27 percent from the field.

A native of Philadelphia, Keita will have to sit out next season before getting three more seasons of eligibility.

Although Keita failed to make an impact during his only season at South Carolina, he’ll be a coveted transfer thanks to his size and upside.

Mississippi State losing two to transfer

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Mississippi State will lose two players to transfer as freshmen Mario Kegler and Eli Wright are leaving the program.

Both Kegler and Wright were four-star prospects coming out of high school as they were apart of a six-man recruiting class that is supposed to be a major foundation for Ben Howland’s future with the Bulldogs.

The 6-foot-7 Kegler was Mississippi State’s third-leading scorer last season as he averaged 9.7 points and 5.5 rebounds per game. Kegler should command some quality schools on the transfer market, especially since he’ll still have three more years of eligibility after sitting out next season due to NCAA transfer regulations. Kegler’s loss is also notable for Mississippi State because it is the second consecutive offseason that Howland lost a top-100, in-state product to transfer after only one season after Malik Newman left for Kansas.

Wright, a 6-foot-4 guard, was never able to find consistent minutes as he was already behind underclass perimeter options like Quinndary Weatherspoon, Lamar Peters and Tyson Carter last season. With Nick Weatherspoon, Quinndary’s four-star brother, also joining the Bulldogs next season, the writing was likely on the wall that Wright wasn’t going to earn significant playing time.