Should Virginia be the fourth one-seed?

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With the unveiling of the NCAA tournament bracket there were many surprises from a seeding standpoint, but that wasn’t the case in regards to three of the four one-seeds. Florida, Arizona and Wichita State were expected to land on the top line, and that proved to be the case.

That left one spot, with that final one-seed being one of the focuses of conference championship week. The recipient of that final one-seed was Virginia, winners of the ACC regular-season and tournament titles. Tony Bennett’s team features a tough pack-line man-to-man defense and a balanced offensive attack led by guards Malcolm Brogdon and Joe Harris.

The question: did the selection committee get this choice right?

Ranked sixth nationally the Cavaliers are eighth in the most recent RPI according to rpiforecast.com. And by the looks of Virginia’s overall resume, it looks as if the selection committee gave them a lot of respect for winning the ACC.

RELATED: CBT’s instant analysis of the East Region bracket

The Cavaliers won four games against teams currently in the Top 50 of the RPI according to rpiforecast.com, with all four of those wins coming in conference play. Among Virginia’s non-conference games (non-conference SOS of 38) their best win came against SMU (RPI: 53), with VCU, Wisconsin, Green Bay and Tennessee all handing the Cavaliers defeats.

Was Virginia the beneficiary of their run through the ACC? That certainly looks to be the case upon inspection of their non-conference resume. But if it’s to be argued that Virginia’s designation as a one-seed is up for debate, there’s also the need to take a look at the other possible choices.

RELATED: The NCAA selection committee’s official seed list 

The committee handed two-seeds to Kansas, Wisconsin, Michigan and Villanova, with the Jayhawks’ brutal non-conference slate and their winning of the Big 12 regular season title keeping them in the one-seed discussion up until their loss to No. 16 Iowa State in the Big 12 semis. Two things likely kept Kansas out of the equation: their nine losses, and more importantly the health of center Joel Embiid.

Villanova, which lost four games on the season (two to Creighton), won six games (two non-conference) against RPI Top 50 teams per rpiforecast.com with their best victory coming against Kansas in late November. But losing to Seton Hall in the Big East quarters, regardless of the fact that the Pirates needed a Sterling Gibbs shot at the buzzer to win, was not a good final impression for the Wildcats to leave on the selection committee.

RELATED: East Region | South Region | Midwest Region | West Region

Michigan, although the Wolverines won the Big Ten regular season title outright, was like done in by their non-conference accomplishments. Of Michigan’s ten wins against teams in the Top 50 of the RPI just one came in non-conference play, with the Wolverines beating Stanford. Michigan certainly challenged itself with games against Iowa State, Arizona and Duke, but they came up empty in those games.

As for Wisconsin, that 1-5 stretch early in Big Ten play and a Big Ten semifinal loss to Michigan State likely ended their hopes because they’ve got wins over Virginia, Florida and Saint Louis on their non-conference resume. Were there any other options? Louisville, which received a four-seed (terribly under seeded), has been playing like a one-seed of late but their non-conference resume (and a non-conference SOS of 149) lacks muscle with Southern Miss being their best result.

And there’s another possible wild card: Michigan State. The Spartans finished a spot below the Cardinals on the NCAA’s official seed list, but they’ve got the interesting argument of not being at full strength for most of their losses due to injury. Should that be enough for Tom Izzo’s team to land on the one line? That’s debatable, because although there’s no denying the impact of injuries that’s something most teams are forced to navigate in some fashion. And it should be noted that the Spartans won six games against Top 50 opponents, with three coming outside of Big Ten play.

Whether or not Virginia should have received a one-seed is something that can be debated, with detractors likely pointing to their non-conference resume as the reason why the Cavaliers shouldn’t be on the top line. But it’s clear that the committee placed more emphasis on their accomplishments against ACC opposition, and it isn’t as if another team can argue that they were legitimately jobbed either.

Calipari signs two-year extension with Kentucky

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Kentucky continues to take care of John Calipari.

The Wildcats coach has received a two-year extension, keeping him under contract in Lexington through the 2024 season, the school announced Wednesday.

The contract will pay Calipari $7.75 million next season and increase to $8 million per season thereafter.

“John has achieved consistent championship-level performance at Kentucky,” Kentucky athletic director Mitch Barnhart said in a statement. “No one in America is better suited for everything that comes with being the coach here. Not only has he attained incredible success on the court, he is also a leader in our community and in college basketball.

“We have been blessed to have him and Ellen here for the last eight years and we are blessed they will continue to call Kentucky home.”

Not only does the deal extend Calipari, but it continues to keep Kentucky competitive with the NBA, which would seem to be the only outlet that would even potentially tempt Calipari away from Kentucky. An NBA franchise would have to make him among the highest-paid coaches in the league to even match Kentucky financially.

Of course, given that Calipari has spurned interest from the league since returning to college in 2000, it seems unlikely that financial considerations would be the lone or heaviest variable in making a decision to move on.

Certainly, Calipari has an excellent thing going at Kentucky as the premier recruiting program in the country that has enjoyed serious success on the court, culminating in a 2012 national title and a 38-0 start to the 2015 season before a loss in the Final Four.

“The last eight years at the University of Kentucky have been a terrific ride,” Calipari said in a statement. “This extension shows our full commitment to each other. I believe this school is the gold standard and I’m so thankful and blessed that this university has given me this opportunity at this point in my career.”

The Wildcats face UCLA in the Sweet 16 on Friday.

Louisville’s Mitchell declaring for draft, won’t hire an agent

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Louisville’s Donovan Mitchell is the latest to decide to see what the NBA might offer.

“I have decided to test the waters and not hire an agent!” Mitchell wrote in an Instagram post Wednesday. “I am excited to work out this summer for teams and hopefully participate in the NBA combine! I want it to be clear I have not decided to leave Louisville!”

Mitchell, who is expected to be joined by dozens of players, is taking advantage of new NCAA rules that allow him to work out for teams and attend the NBA draft combine before making a decision on whether to remain in the draft and return to school.

Players have until May 24 to withdraw from the draft and return to school.

Mitchell averaged 15.6 points, 4.9 rebounds and 2.7 assists as a sophomore, shooting 40.8 percent overall and 35.4 percent on 3-point attempts.

The 6-foot-3 guard is projected as a potential first-round pick, but should he return, the Cardinals would project as one of the top teams in the country with nearly the entire core returning from this year’s 25-9 squad.

Moe-mentum: Wagner stands tall for Sweet 16-bound Michigan

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ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) Ask Moe Wagner who he looked up to when he was younger, and suddenly the Michigan big man’s fiery demeanor makes a little more sense.

“Kevin Garnett was always my biggest idol, even though our play isn’t really similar. Just the way he brings intensity and energy to his team,” Wagner said. “That always was something that really impressed me.”

Now Wagner is providing his own emotional leadership to a Michigan team that has become one of college basketball’s most remarkable stories this March.

The Wolverines have won six in a row since they were involved in a plane accident on the eve of their Big Ten Tournament opener.

After winning that conference tourney, they opened the NCAAs with victories against Oklahoma State and Louisville – with Wagner scoring 26 points in the win over Louisville that sent Michigan to the Sweet 16.

The 19-year-old Wagner is in his second season with the Wolverines. He showed some promise in 2015-16, but averaged only 8.6 minutes a game as a freshman. He’s been a starter the whole way this season, teaming up with D.J. Wilson to give Michigan some unexpected production in the frontcourt.

The Wolverines entered the season with high hopes thanks to the presence of seniors Derrick Walton and Zak Irvin.

The 6-foot-11 Wagner has made them even tougher to defend. The sophomore from Berlin is averaging 12.2 points a game, and unlike Mitch McGary and Jordan Morgan – two of Michigan’s top big men of the recent past – Wagner is a threat from beyond the arc. He’s made 41 percent of his 3-point attempts in 2016-17, putting even more pressure on opposing teams.

An expressive player on the court, Wagner admits he’s still learning how to keep his emotions under control.

Coach John Beilein says Wagner can be hard on himself, but he has an upbeat attitude the Wolverines can appreciate.

“I don’t want to rob him of his energy and his passion,” Beilein said. “If you heard him in timeouts – I mean, he is really into it. And it’s encouraging things he’s saying.”

The key for Wagner is to stay on the court. He’s been whistled for 100 fouls this season – no other Michigan player has more than 80 – and he picked up two in the first 3:11 when the Wolverines faced Oklahoma State in their NCAA Tournament opener Friday. Wagner played only 14 minutes in that frenetic game, which Michigan won 92-91 .

Against Louisville in the round of 32 , Wagner went 11 of 14 from the field and kept his poise after being called for his second foul late in the first half.

“He’s always just been an excited guy – play hard and play with a lot of passion,” Walton said. “I don’t think anything has changed. I think he’s just channeling it a little better.”

The seventh-seeded Wolverines face third-seeded Oregon on Thursday night in a regional semifinal. Michigan has won seven in a row, a streak that began with the team’s last game of the regular season.

What happened next is well documented. The day before its opening game in the conference tournament, Michigan’s plane slid off the runway .

There were no serious injuries, and the Wolverines arrived in time to play. Then they won four games in four days to take the title.

Now, Michigan is two victories away from an improbable Final Four appearance. If the Wolverines actually make it that far, Wagner will be a big reason why – and he’ll probably be as excited as anyone.

“One of my youth coaches actually used to say that I was somebody who, like, sees the basketball court as a stage and really enjoys it,” Wagner said. “Last year, I started to understand what that actually means, and kind of embraced that this year. That’s just me. I really love it. I really enjoy it.”

 

California’s Ivan Rabb declares for the NBA Draft

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Ivan Rabb announced on Wednesday that he will be declaring for the NBA Draft and foregoing his final two seasons with California.

“I want to thank everybody for their support,” Rabb said in a statement. “Since the day I committed to Cal, the love from Bay Area fans was overwhelming. I could genuinely tell that people really appreciated seeing me come to Cal and succeed and do well. Haas Pavilion will always hold a special place in my heart, and I won’t forget how incredible it felt to be “Oakland’s Own” as I ran onto the court in front of my friends, family and team.”

As a sophomore, Rabb averaged 14.0 points and 10.5 boards. He’s projected as a mid-to-late first round pick in the draft a year after making the decision to return to school as a projected lottery pick last season.

Duke’s Jayson Tatum declares for the NBA Draft

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Duke’s Jayson Tatum will declare for the NBA Draft and hire an agent, the program announced on Wednesday.

Tatum is a projected top five pick in the NBA Draft. He averaged 16.8 points playing the role of small-ball four for the Blue Devils this season after missing the first month of the season with a foot injury.

“I have absolutely loved coaching Jayson Tatum,” Coach K said in a statement. “His skill set and work ethic will make him a star in the NBA. Whichever team selects him will be getting a humble, thoughtful and talented young man whom we are proud to call a member of the Duke basketball brotherhood.”

Tatum was the most talented player on the Blue Devils this season, but it was an up and down year for Duke as a whole. They were predicted by just about everyone to win the national title back in the preseason, but they eventually bowed out of the NCAA tournament in the second round.