NBCSports.com’s 2014 College Basketball All-Americans

AP Photo


Doug McDermott, Creighton (26.5 ppg, 7.2 rpg, 44.7% 3PT): Dougie McBuckets was considered by most to be the consensus National Player of the Year entering the final weekend of the regular season. Then he went out on his Senior Night and scored a career-high 45 points, giving him 3,000 for his career while passing Oscar Robertson and Hersey Hawkins on college basketball’s career scoring list. If it wasn’t a consensus then, it should be now.

Sean Kilpatrick, Cincinnati (20.9 ppg, 4.3 rpg): The Bearcats are a Final Four contender because they are an elite team on the defensive end of the floor. Offensively, however, they aren’t all that good, and that’s after you factor in that Sean Kilpatrick is having a terrific season. His efficiency numbers aren’t terribly different from McDermott’s, but instead of playing in the nation’s most efficient offense, he’s playing in the nation’s 101st most efficient offense.

Russ Smith, Louisville (17.5 ppg, 4.8 apg, 3.5 rpg, 2.0 spg, 39.4% 3PT): The key to Louisville’s season has been Smith’s ability to embrace being a point guard isn’t of simply being Russdiculous. It should tell you something that, on his Senior Night and just three days after exploding for 22 second half points and six threes in eight minutes in a come-from-behind win at SMU, Smith finished with 13 assists and just two shots from the floor.

RELATED: Player of the Year | Coach of the Year | Freshman of the Year

Jabari Parker, Duke (19.2 ppg, 9.0 rpg): Parker’s midseason slump is a distant memory at this point, as he’s figured out how to play as Duke’s best defensive rebounder and most important weapon offensively. Being the cornerstone offensively for one of the nation’s top two offenses is impressive.

Getty Images

Shabazz Napier, UConn (17.8 ppg, 6.0 rpg, 5.2 apg, 1.8 spg, 40.7% 3PT): Where would UConn be without Shabazz Napier? And I’m not just talking about the fact that he’s their go-to guy offensively, their best on-ball defender and their leading rebounder despite standing all of 6-foot-1. What about all the game-winning, clutch baskets that he’s scored this season? Would UConn still be a tournament team without win over Florida, Indiana, Memphis and Boston College?


  • Kyle Anderson, UCLA (14.9 ppg, 8.6 rpg, 6.7 apg, 48.0% 3PT): Slo-mo just flat-out produces. He’s the engine that’s carried UCLA’s high-powered offense this season.
  • Nick Johnson, Arizona (16.1 ppg, 4.0 rpg): Johnson has slumped a bit down the stretch of the season, but he’s the best perimeter defender and the most dangerous scorer in the half court for a top five team.
  • Bryce Cotton, Providence (21.7 ppg, 5.9 apg): Cotton’s had a truly unbelievable season, carrying an injury-riddled Providence team to within a strong Big East tournament of an at-large bid. He’s averaging 40.1 minutes this season.
  • Cleanthony Early, Wichita State (16.0 ppg, 5.9 rpg): The leading scorer for the undefeated Shockers, Early is WSU’s best athlete and their toughest matchup: an athletic, 6-foot-8 four-man with three-point range.
  • Andrew Wiggins, Kansas (16.8 ppg, 5.9 rpg, 1.2 spg): For all the criticism that Wiggins has gotten this season, he finished the year as the leading scorer, third-leading rebounder and best defender on a top five team and national title that won the nation’s toughest conference outright. Not bad.

MORE: Florida, Wichita State are still sitting atop NBCSports.com’s Top 25


  • T.J. Warren, N.C. State (24.2 ppg, 6.9 rpg): With all due respect to Doug McDermott, I’m not sure there is a better pure scorer in the country than Warren.
  • DeAndre Kane, Iowa State (17.1 ppg, 6.7 rpg, 5.9 apg): As impressive as Kane’s numbers are, imagine if he didn’t have to deal with a sprained ankle at the start of league play.
  • Nik Stauskas, Michigan (17.4 ppg, 3.4 apg, 3.3 rpg, 45.8% 3PT): The development of Stauskas into a playmaker that John Beilein can run his offense through is the reason the Wolverines are Big Ten champs.
  • Cameron Bairstow, New Mexico (20.3 ppg, 7.2 rpg): Bairstow is the most improved player in the country are arguably the nation’s best low-post scorer.
  • Melvin Ejim, Iowa State (18.2 ppg, 8.6 rpg): Ejim was voted by the coaches as the Big 12’s player of the year, over two other all-americans, Joel Embiid, Juwan State, Marcus Smart and a handful of other stars.

POSTERIZED: Wyoming’s Josh Adams takes flight

Josh Adams
Associated Press
Leave a comment

Not only is Wyoming senior guard Josh Adams the lone returning starter from a team that won the Mountain West tournament last season, but he’s also one of college basketball’s best dunkers. And if anyone may have forgotten about his jumping ability, Adams put it on display Saturday during the Cowboys’ win over Montana State.

After splitting two Montana State players at the top of the key Adams attacked the basket, dunking with two hands over a late-arriving help-side defender. If you’re going to rotate over, have to do it quicker than that.

Video credit: Wyoming Athletics

Defensive progress will determine No. 4 Iowa State’s ceiling

Monte Morris
Associated Press
Leave a comment

Even with the coaching change from Fred Hoiberg to Steve Prohm, No. 4 Iowa State remains one of the nation’s best offensive teams. Given their skills on that end of the floor many teams find it tough to go score for score with the Cyclones, and that’s what happened to Illinois in Iowa State’s 84-73 win in the Emerald Coast Classic title game.

Georges Niang scored 23 points and grabbed eight rebounds, with Monté Morris adding 20, nine rebounds and six assists and Abdel Nader 18 points as the Cyclones moved to 5-0 on the season. The three-pointers weren’t falling in the second half, as Iowa State shot 0-f0r-12, but they shot 19-for-24 inside of the arc to pull away from a team that lost big man Mike Thorne Jr. late in the first half to a left knee injury.

Illinois’ loss of size in the paint opened things up offensively for Iowa State, and the Cyclones took advantage. But where this group grabbed control of the game was on the defensive end of the floor, and that will be the key for a team with Big 12 and national title aspirations.

Nader took on the responsibility of defending Illinois’ Malcolm Hill (20 points) in the second half and did a solid job of keeping the junior wing in check, with that serving as the spark to a 12-2 run that put the game away. There’s no denying that the Cyclones can put points on the board; most of the talent from last season is back and the productivity on that end of the floor hasn’t changed as a result. Niang’s one of the nation’s best forwards, and both Morris (who now ranks among the country’s best point guards) and Nader have taken significant strides in their respective games.

Iowa State will add Deonte Burton in December, giving them another option to call upon. Front court depth is a bit of a concern, as Iowa State can ill afford to lose a Niang or Jameel McKay, but there’s enough on the roster to compensate for that and force mismatches in other areas.

But the biggest question for this group is how effective they can become at stringing together stops. Illinois certainly had its moments in both halves Saturday night, but Iowa State also showed during the game’s decisive stretch that they can step up defensively. The key now is to do so consistently, and if that occurs the Cyclones can be a threat both within the Big 12 and nationally.