NBCSports.com’s 2014 College Basketball All-Americans

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Doug McDermott, Creighton (26.5 ppg, 7.2 rpg, 44.7% 3PT): Dougie McBuckets was considered by most to be the consensus National Player of the Year entering the final weekend of the regular season. Then he went out on his Senior Night and scored a career-high 45 points, giving him 3,000 for his career while passing Oscar Robertson and Hersey Hawkins on college basketball’s career scoring list. If it wasn’t a consensus then, it should be now.

Sean Kilpatrick, Cincinnati (20.9 ppg, 4.3 rpg): The Bearcats are a Final Four contender because they are an elite team on the defensive end of the floor. Offensively, however, they aren’t all that good, and that’s after you factor in that Sean Kilpatrick is having a terrific season. His efficiency numbers aren’t terribly different from McDermott’s, but instead of playing in the nation’s most efficient offense, he’s playing in the nation’s 101st most efficient offense.

Russ Smith, Louisville (17.5 ppg, 4.8 apg, 3.5 rpg, 2.0 spg, 39.4% 3PT): The key to Louisville’s season has been Smith’s ability to embrace being a point guard isn’t of simply being Russdiculous. It should tell you something that, on his Senior Night and just three days after exploding for 22 second half points and six threes in eight minutes in a come-from-behind win at SMU, Smith finished with 13 assists and just two shots from the floor.

RELATED: Player of the Year | Coach of the Year | Freshman of the Year

Jabari Parker, Duke (19.2 ppg, 9.0 rpg): Parker’s midseason slump is a distant memory at this point, as he’s figured out how to play as Duke’s best defensive rebounder and most important weapon offensively. Being the cornerstone offensively for one of the nation’s top two offenses is impressive.

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Shabazz Napier, UConn (17.8 ppg, 6.0 rpg, 5.2 apg, 1.8 spg, 40.7% 3PT): Where would UConn be without Shabazz Napier? And I’m not just talking about the fact that he’s their go-to guy offensively, their best on-ball defender and their leading rebounder despite standing all of 6-foot-1. What about all the game-winning, clutch baskets that he’s scored this season? Would UConn still be a tournament team without win over Florida, Indiana, Memphis and Boston College?


  • Kyle Anderson, UCLA (14.9 ppg, 8.6 rpg, 6.7 apg, 48.0% 3PT): Slo-mo just flat-out produces. He’s the engine that’s carried UCLA’s high-powered offense this season.
  • Nick Johnson, Arizona (16.1 ppg, 4.0 rpg): Johnson has slumped a bit down the stretch of the season, but he’s the best perimeter defender and the most dangerous scorer in the half court for a top five team.
  • Bryce Cotton, Providence (21.7 ppg, 5.9 apg): Cotton’s had a truly unbelievable season, carrying an injury-riddled Providence team to within a strong Big East tournament of an at-large bid. He’s averaging 40.1 minutes this season.
  • Cleanthony Early, Wichita State (16.0 ppg, 5.9 rpg): The leading scorer for the undefeated Shockers, Early is WSU’s best athlete and their toughest matchup: an athletic, 6-foot-8 four-man with three-point range.
  • Andrew Wiggins, Kansas (16.8 ppg, 5.9 rpg, 1.2 spg): For all the criticism that Wiggins has gotten this season, he finished the year as the leading scorer, third-leading rebounder and best defender on a top five team and national title that won the nation’s toughest conference outright. Not bad.

MORE: Florida, Wichita State are still sitting atop NBCSports.com’s Top 25


  • T.J. Warren, N.C. State (24.2 ppg, 6.9 rpg): With all due respect to Doug McDermott, I’m not sure there is a better pure scorer in the country than Warren.
  • DeAndre Kane, Iowa State (17.1 ppg, 6.7 rpg, 5.9 apg): As impressive as Kane’s numbers are, imagine if he didn’t have to deal with a sprained ankle at the start of league play.
  • Nik Stauskas, Michigan (17.4 ppg, 3.4 apg, 3.3 rpg, 45.8% 3PT): The development of Stauskas into a playmaker that John Beilein can run his offense through is the reason the Wolverines are Big Ten champs.
  • Cameron Bairstow, New Mexico (20.3 ppg, 7.2 rpg): Bairstow is the most improved player in the country are arguably the nation’s best low-post scorer.
  • Melvin Ejim, Iowa State (18.2 ppg, 8.6 rpg): Ejim was voted by the coaches as the Big 12’s player of the year, over two other all-americans, Joel Embiid, Juwan State, Marcus Smart and a handful of other stars.

Sun Belt approves new scheduling format

Sun Belt Conference
Sun Belt Conference
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With an 11-member setup the Sun Belt Conference has played a 20-game conference schedule the last couple of years, which may be seen as a positive when it comes to determining the regular season champion (home-and-home between every team). But for a conference that spans from North Carolina (Appalachian State) to Texas (UT-Arlington, Texas State) travel was far from easy in that setup.

And with Coastal Carolina joining next season, it was clear that the league needed to do something with its scheduling.

Thursday the Sun Belt members approved an 18-game conference schedule, which will begin with the 2016-17 season when the league consists of 12 members. Included in the agreement is the assignment of travel partners (similar to setups in the Pac-12 and Ivy League), and teams playing no more than three consecutive conference games on the road.

Schools will also be guaranteed at least five weekend home games during conference play, and there will be no more weekends in which teams play conference games both home and away (thus cutting down on travel). Obviously with the addition of Coastal Carolina the Sun Belt needed to make some changes in their scheduling, and this week the conference made the moves they needed to make.

Former Wichita State assistant returns as a consultant

Chris Jans, Gregg Marshall
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Prior to a one-year stint as the head coach coach at Bowling Green that came to an end in early April as a result of an incident at a Bowling Green restaurant, Chris Jans was a member of Gregg Marshall’s coaching staff at Wichita State from 2007-14. During those seven seasons Jans was a key figure as the Shockers made the progression to a respected national power.

Jans is back in Wichita, with Paul Suellentrop of the Wichita Eagle reporting Thursday that he’s serving as a consultant to the program. Jans’ consulting agreement runs for 45 days, which the school can renew, and he’ll be paid $10,000 for the work. While Jans isn’t allowed to do any coaching, he can watch practices and provide Marshall and the coaching staff with his observations.

“He will be able to consult with the coaching staff, only on what he observes in practice,” said Darron Boatright, WSU deputy athletics director. “By NCAA rule, a consultant is not allowed to have communication with student-athletes … not about basketball-related activities or performance.”

While Jans (who according to the story has served in a similar role for another school) can’t do any coaching in this role, his return does give Marshall another trusted voice to call upon when needed. Wichita State bid farewell to an assistant coach this spring with Steve Forbes being hired as the head coach at East Tennessee State, with his position being filled by former Sunrise Christian Academy coach Kyle Lindsted.

h/t ShockerHoops.net