NBCSports.com’s 2014 College Basketball All-Americans

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Doug McDermott, Creighton (26.5 ppg, 7.2 rpg, 44.7% 3PT): Dougie McBuckets was considered by most to be the consensus National Player of the Year entering the final weekend of the regular season. Then he went out on his Senior Night and scored a career-high 45 points, giving him 3,000 for his career while passing Oscar Robertson and Hersey Hawkins on college basketball’s career scoring list. If it wasn’t a consensus then, it should be now.

Sean Kilpatrick, Cincinnati (20.9 ppg, 4.3 rpg): The Bearcats are a Final Four contender because they are an elite team on the defensive end of the floor. Offensively, however, they aren’t all that good, and that’s after you factor in that Sean Kilpatrick is having a terrific season. His efficiency numbers aren’t terribly different from McDermott’s, but instead of playing in the nation’s most efficient offense, he’s playing in the nation’s 101st most efficient offense.

Russ Smith, Louisville (17.5 ppg, 4.8 apg, 3.5 rpg, 2.0 spg, 39.4% 3PT): The key to Louisville’s season has been Smith’s ability to embrace being a point guard isn’t of simply being Russdiculous. It should tell you something that, on his Senior Night and just three days after exploding for 22 second half points and six threes in eight minutes in a come-from-behind win at SMU, Smith finished with 13 assists and just two shots from the floor.

RELATED: Player of the Year | Coach of the Year | Freshman of the Year

Jabari Parker, Duke (19.2 ppg, 9.0 rpg): Parker’s midseason slump is a distant memory at this point, as he’s figured out how to play as Duke’s best defensive rebounder and most important weapon offensively. Being the cornerstone offensively for one of the nation’s top two offenses is impressive.

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Shabazz Napier, UConn (17.8 ppg, 6.0 rpg, 5.2 apg, 1.8 spg, 40.7% 3PT): Where would UConn be without Shabazz Napier? And I’m not just talking about the fact that he’s their go-to guy offensively, their best on-ball defender and their leading rebounder despite standing all of 6-foot-1. What about all the game-winning, clutch baskets that he’s scored this season? Would UConn still be a tournament team without win over Florida, Indiana, Memphis and Boston College?


  • Kyle Anderson, UCLA (14.9 ppg, 8.6 rpg, 6.7 apg, 48.0% 3PT): Slo-mo just flat-out produces. He’s the engine that’s carried UCLA’s high-powered offense this season.
  • Nick Johnson, Arizona (16.1 ppg, 4.0 rpg): Johnson has slumped a bit down the stretch of the season, but he’s the best perimeter defender and the most dangerous scorer in the half court for a top five team.
  • Bryce Cotton, Providence (21.7 ppg, 5.9 apg): Cotton’s had a truly unbelievable season, carrying an injury-riddled Providence team to within a strong Big East tournament of an at-large bid. He’s averaging 40.1 minutes this season.
  • Cleanthony Early, Wichita State (16.0 ppg, 5.9 rpg): The leading scorer for the undefeated Shockers, Early is WSU’s best athlete and their toughest matchup: an athletic, 6-foot-8 four-man with three-point range.
  • Andrew Wiggins, Kansas (16.8 ppg, 5.9 rpg, 1.2 spg): For all the criticism that Wiggins has gotten this season, he finished the year as the leading scorer, third-leading rebounder and best defender on a top five team and national title that won the nation’s toughest conference outright. Not bad.

MORE: Florida, Wichita State are still sitting atop NBCSports.com’s Top 25


  • T.J. Warren, N.C. State (24.2 ppg, 6.9 rpg): With all due respect to Doug McDermott, I’m not sure there is a better pure scorer in the country than Warren.
  • DeAndre Kane, Iowa State (17.1 ppg, 6.7 rpg, 5.9 apg): As impressive as Kane’s numbers are, imagine if he didn’t have to deal with a sprained ankle at the start of league play.
  • Nik Stauskas, Michigan (17.4 ppg, 3.4 apg, 3.3 rpg, 45.8% 3PT): The development of Stauskas into a playmaker that John Beilein can run his offense through is the reason the Wolverines are Big Ten champs.
  • Cameron Bairstow, New Mexico (20.3 ppg, 7.2 rpg): Bairstow is the most improved player in the country are arguably the nation’s best low-post scorer.
  • Melvin Ejim, Iowa State (18.2 ppg, 8.6 rpg): Ejim was voted by the coaches as the Big 12’s player of the year, over two other all-americans, Joel Embiid, Juwan State, Marcus Smart and a handful of other stars.

Michigan State playing zone? It’s possible

Tom Izzo
Associated Press
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Throughout Tom Izzo’s tenure at Michigan State the team’s half-court man-to-man defense has been a staple, and the Spartans have generally proven difficult to have a high rate of offensive success against. The reliance on that defense is why Izzo’s conversations earlier this summer about using some token full-court pressure due to the shortening of the shot clock caught some people off-guard.

According to the Detroit Free Press there’s another wrinkle the Spartans may use, and it’s likely that this wrinkle will show up more often than the full-court press. During Friday’s opening practice the Spartans worked on a 2-3 zone, and Izzo wants his assistants to make sure the team works on the defense consistently throughout the season.

That’s also why zone in general isn’t going to get heavy play at MSU, but having it as a tool could be beneficial — especially in games with touch fouls on the perimeter called in droves.

“I told (my assistant coaches): ‘You hold me accountable to working on it every day some’ … I have a tendency to drift off on that, and I don’t want to drift off on it,” Izzo said of the 2-3 zone. “But we will be, rest assured, a 90-some percent man-to-man team still and hopefully take some of those principles to zone.”

As noted in the story one of the risks in using pressure is allowing quality shots, which is why it’s unlikely that Michigan State will go to it. But even with Izzo vowing that his team will work on the zone, that doesn’t mean they’ll be playing it as often as Syracuse does.

Man-to-man has been Michigan State’s staple and it will continue to be. But it doesn’t hurt to look for other ways to keep opponents from getting the looks they want, especially if teams have five fewer seconds to find those shots.

Virginia used 3-on-3 to adjust to new shot clock

Malcolm Brogdon
Associated Press
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When the college basketball rules committee made the decision to trim the shot clock down to 30 second from 35, one reason for the switch was the desire to improve offensive production. With offensive numbers at their lowest point in years, proponents of the move see the shot clock change as a necessary move if scoring is to improve.

Whether or not that winds up being the case will be seen throughout the upcoming season, but teams are still having to make adjustments during the preseason.

Virginia, which has played at a snail’s pace (and with great success, mind you) in recent years, made some adjustments to their summer work in anticipation of playing with a 30-second shot clock. One adjustment was more games of 3-on-3 with a 15-second shot clock, which forced all involved to be more decisive in their offensive decision-making.

While the pack-line defense will always be a staple of Tony Bennett’s teams, the feeling in Charlottesville is that they’ve got the offensive firepower needed to both play faster and be more efficient offensively than they were in 2014-15 (29th nationally in adjusted offensive efficiency per Ken Pomeroy). One of the players who will lead the way is senior guard Malcolm Brogdon, who led the team in scoring and was a first team All-ACC selection, and he discussed the team’s outlook with Mike Barber of the Richmond Times-Dispatch.

And even though Anderson’s highlight-reel shot blocking was the thing that frequently fueled fast-breaks for U.Va. last season, Brogdon and [Anthony] Gill said they expect this year’s team to actually push the tempo even more.

“I think we’re going to be a team that gets out and runs more,” Brogdon said. “I think we’ll have three guards on the floor, most of the time, will be able to handle the ball as a point guard and get out in transition. I think we’ll play a lot faster.”

Brogdon and Gill are two of the team’s three returning starters with point guard London Perrantes being the other, and the Cavaliers also return most of their reserves from last year’s rotation. That experience will help them on both ends of the floor as they prepare for a run at a third straight ACC regular season title. And in theory it also allows them to extend themselves a bit more offensively than they did a season ago.