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UNLV guard Bryce Dejean-Jones suspended for regular season finale at Nevada

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On the heels of their 73-64 loss to No. 10 San Diego State on Wednesday, UNLV announced Thursday that guard Bryce Dejean-Jones has been suspended for conduct detrimental to the team. Dejean-Jones will miss the Runnin’ Rebels game at Nevada on Saturday as a result of the suspension.

Dejean-Jones had a frustrating night against the Aztecs, shooting 1-for-7 from the field and finishing the game with seven points, two assists and three turnovers. And according to Matt Youmans of the Las Vegas Review-Journal, that frustration may have boiled over the immediate aftermath of Wednesday’s defeat.

Visibly upset after UNLV’s 73-64 loss to No. 10 San Diego State on Wednesday night, Dejean-Jones appeared to shove aside teammate Jelan Kendrick and walked off the court without shaking hands with the Aztecs. He was seen leaving the Thomas & Mack Center about 15 minutes after the game.

Starting forward Roscoe Smith missed Wednesday’s game and has yet to be cleared after suffering a concussion against Air Force last weekend, meaning that there’s still a chance that UNLV could be without two starters on Saturday. As for Dejean-Jones, he’s averaging a team-high 13.4 points per game but has struggled with shot selection at times.

Without Dejean-Jones in the lineup more will be asked of guards Kevin Olekaibe and Deville Smith, with the former scoring 11 points against San Diego State. Smith struggled against the Aztecs, finishing with two points and seven turnovers, and he’ll need to play much better against the Wolf Pack’s Deonte Burton.

Pitino: Mathiang won’t return this season after foot injury

Louisville's Mangok Mathiang dunks the ball during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game against Connecticut, Saturday, Jan. 18, 2014, in Storrs, Conn. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill)
(AP Photo/Jessica Hill)
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LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) Louisville coach Rick Pitino says he won’t bring back injured junior forward Mangok Mathiang now that the No. 13 Cardinals are out of postseason following a self-imposed ban.

The 6-foot-10 Mathiang broke his left foot Dec. 19 against Western Kentucky and was expected to miss six to eight weeks after surgery. He had been working out and Pitino said Friday he considered playing him in the postseason.

But Louisville announced the one-year ban last Friday from all postseason tournaments after its investigation into an escort’s allegations that a former staffer hired her and other dancers for sex parties revealed that violations did occur.

Pitino says it’s in Mathiang’s best interest not to return this season and heal, adding, “I think he’s very much OK with it.”

Mountain West admits official error, won’t change result of Boise State-Colorado State

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After reviewing video for a second straight day, the Mountain West has determined that Boise State should have beaten Colorado State on Wednesday night, but that due to an NCAA rule the outcome of the game cannot be changed.

Boise State’s James Webb III hit a one-handed, banked-in three at the end of overtime in Colorado State’s Moby Arena, breaking an 84-all tie, but after officials reviewed the play on the video monitor, they waived off the basket. Webb got the shot off in time, but the clock operator did not start the clock on time. After using stopwatch technology embedded in the video monitor, the referees determined that it took 1.3 seconds from the time that Webb caught the pass until the time that he got the shot off.

There were 0.8 seconds left when Boise State took the ball out of bounds.

On Thursday, the league announced that the referees followed the correct protocol to make the call.

They released a video that the referees used to make the decision, but upon further analysis — and amid a push on social media — it was determined that there was a difference between the “rate at which the embedded digital stopwatch advanced and the rate at which the game clock regressed during the instant replay review.”

In other words, the referees made the correct call with the evidence they had available, but the conference provided them with flawed evidence.

Boise State lost 97-93 in double-overtime.

The loss came four days after officials botched a call at the end of San Diego State’s win over New Mexico.