Expert opinions vary on the topic of college coaches sideline behavior

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By now, you’ve seen the video.

As Cincinnati head coach Mick Cronin argued a call in his team’s loss at UConn on Saturday, veteran official Ted Valentine — TV Teddy — reacted by getting into Cronin’s face along the sideline. That set Cronin off, as the diminutive coach began shoving players and staff members out of the way to try and get in the last with Valentine.

There’s no question that Valentine was wrong here. Anyone can understand the difficulty in allowing someone to berate you without responding, but officials simply cannot react the way that Valentine did. And do his credit, he apologized afterwards. “I was just totally wrong. I was out of place by walking into his space,” Valentine told SI.com. “It was just one of those situations where I got caught up in the moment. I was out of bounds because I walked into his domain. That’s why I didn’t give him a technical because I knew I was wrong, and two wrongs don’t make a right. If it had been 15, 16 years ago, I never would have caught myself like that.”

The more interesting discussion, however, is the sideline behavior of our sport’s head coaches. This was not the first time that a head coach’s run-in with an official went viral. There was Jim Boeheim’s ejection at Duke last weekend. Earlier this season, both Kevin Ollie of UConn and Fran McCaffery of Iowa lost their minds and got ejected from a game.

“I think there’s a lack of humility with the way referees are addressed, the way with they’re dealt with in games,” ESPN analyst Jay Bilas said. “We’ve got a unique problem. Coaches in the NBA behave better than coaches in college, who claim to be teachers and molders of young men. How can that possibly be?

“Everybody needs to take a look in the mirror here and fix our behavior, including in press conferences where we are questioning the officiating and we are denigrating the product to the public, and public confidence in the job the officials are doing. … If we think that coach behavior influences the officials, then that’s a competitive advantage and we need to put a stop to it. If we don’t think it’s an influence, then it looks horrible and it erodes public confidence in officiating and we need to stop it. So tell me how we don’t need to stop it. We have to stop it. The coaches have to take the lead and police themselves.”

And to a point, he’s right.

In no other sport is it acceptable for coaches to continually berate officials the way that college basketball coaches do it.

But if you listen to Cronin, there is a reason this happens.

“My beef with that is guys like Mick Cronin and Buzz Williams (of Marquette) of the world, we deal with some of it,” Cronin told ESPN after the game. “When nobody gets in the Jim Boeheim’s face or Mike Krzyzewski’s face.”

“The truth is that in college basketball, it’s not equitable. Coaches are treated differently. Officials in different leagues officiate differently,” Cronin added to SI.com. “If Seth Davis is the coach at New York State and he’s going against Jim Boeheim, his fans feel like they don’t get respect so they blow up the blogs and say they want a veteran coach. You can’t sit there and not make sure you’re getting equality. And by the way, neither can Jim Boeheim. Jim Calhoun didn’t build UConn in the ’80s by letting Rollie, Louis and Big John get all the calls.”

Former coach and current ESPN analyst Dan Dakich agrees with Cronin.

“The biggest little dirty secret in college basketball is when Bowling Green goes to play at Michigan, Michigan and the Big Ten pays officials twice what the MAC does,” Dakich said on ESPN’s Outside The Lines. “Who do you think that official is going to aside with? He’s going to side with the coach at Michigan or the coach at Indiana as it pertains to a MAC coach or a Horizon League coach.”

“Guys want Krzyzewski on their side. Guys want Boeheim on their side. I 1000% agree with what Mick Cronin said. It’s not even close. I used to tell [Bobby Knight], ‘Stand up, we need some travels.'”

VIDEO: Jay-Z’s nephew posterizes nation’s No. 1 recruit Marvin Bagley III

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Nahziah Carter is an unsigned 6-foot-6 wing in the Class of 2017.

He’s also Jay-Z’s nephew, and he just so happened to posterize Marvin Bagley III — the clearcut No. 1 prospect in the Class of 2018 — while Hova was in the stands watching him.

NCAA denies extra-year request by NC State guard Henderson

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RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The NCAA has denied North Carolina State guard Terry Henderson’s request for another year of eligibility.

Henderson announced the decision Friday in a statement issued by the school.

The Raleigh native played two seasons at West Virginia before transferring to N.C. State and redshirting in 2014-15. He played for only 7 minutes of the following season before suffering a season-ending ankle injury.

As a redshirt senior in 2016-17, he was the team’s second-leading scorer at 13.8 points per game and made a team-best 78 3-pointers.

Henderson called it “an honor and privilege” to play in his hometown.

SMU gets transfer in Georgetown’s Akoy Agau

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SMU pulled in a frontcourt player in Georgetown transfer Akoy Agau, a source confirmed to NBCSports.com. Agau is immediately eligible for next season as a graduate transfer.

The 6-foot-8 Agau started his career at Louisville before transferring to Georgetown after one season. Spending two seasons with the Hoyas, Agau was limited to 11 minutes in his first season due to injuries. He averaged 4.5 points and 4.3 rebounds per game last season.

Coming out of high school, Agau was a four-star prospect but he’s never lived up to that billing in-part because of injuries. Now, Agau gets one more chance to make a difference as he’s hoping to help replace some departed pieces like Ben Moore and Semi Ojeleye.

South Carolina loses big man Sedee Keita to transfer

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South Carolina big man Sedee Keita will transfer from the program, he announced on Friday.

The 6-foot-9 Keita was once regarded as a top-100 national prospect in the Class of 2016, but he never found consistent minutes with the Gamecocks for last season’s Final Four team.

Keita appeared in 29 games and averaged 1.1 points and 2.0 rebounds per game while shooting 27 percent from the field.

A native of Philadelphia, Keita will have to sit out next season before getting three more seasons of eligibility.

Although Keita failed to make an impact during his only season at South Carolina, he’ll be a coveted transfer thanks to his size and upside.

Mississippi State losing two to transfer

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Mississippi State will lose two players to transfer as freshmen Mario Kegler and Eli Wright are leaving the program.

Both Kegler and Wright were four-star prospects coming out of high school as they were apart of a six-man recruiting class that is supposed to be a major foundation for Ben Howland’s future with the Bulldogs.

The 6-foot-7 Kegler was Mississippi State’s third-leading scorer last season as he averaged 9.7 points and 5.5 rebounds per game. Kegler should command some quality schools on the transfer market, especially since he’ll still have three more years of eligibility after sitting out next season due to NCAA transfer regulations. Kegler’s loss is also notable for Mississippi State because it is the second consecutive offseason that Howland lost a top-100, in-state product to transfer after only one season after Malik Newman left for Kansas.

Wright, a 6-foot-4 guard, was never able to find consistent minutes as he was already behind underclass perimeter options like Quinndary Weatherspoon, Lamar Peters and Tyson Carter last season. With Nick Weatherspoon, Quinndary’s four-star brother, also joining the Bulldogs next season, the writing was likely on the wall that Wright wasn’t going to earn significant playing time.