Expert opinions vary on the topic of college coaches sideline behavior

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By now, you’ve seen the video.

As Cincinnati head coach Mick Cronin argued a call in his team’s loss at UConn on Saturday, veteran official Ted Valentine — TV Teddy — reacted by getting into Cronin’s face along the sideline. That set Cronin off, as the diminutive coach began shoving players and staff members out of the way to try and get in the last with Valentine.

There’s no question that Valentine was wrong here. Anyone can understand the difficulty in allowing someone to berate you without responding, but officials simply cannot react the way that Valentine did. And do his credit, he apologized afterwards. “I was just totally wrong. I was out of place by walking into his space,” Valentine told SI.com. “It was just one of those situations where I got caught up in the moment. I was out of bounds because I walked into his domain. That’s why I didn’t give him a technical because I knew I was wrong, and two wrongs don’t make a right. If it had been 15, 16 years ago, I never would have caught myself like that.”

The more interesting discussion, however, is the sideline behavior of our sport’s head coaches. This was not the first time that a head coach’s run-in with an official went viral. There was Jim Boeheim’s ejection at Duke last weekend. Earlier this season, both Kevin Ollie of UConn and Fran McCaffery of Iowa lost their minds and got ejected from a game.

“I think there’s a lack of humility with the way referees are addressed, the way with they’re dealt with in games,” ESPN analyst Jay Bilas said. “We’ve got a unique problem. Coaches in the NBA behave better than coaches in college, who claim to be teachers and molders of young men. How can that possibly be?

“Everybody needs to take a look in the mirror here and fix our behavior, including in press conferences where we are questioning the officiating and we are denigrating the product to the public, and public confidence in the job the officials are doing. … If we think that coach behavior influences the officials, then that’s a competitive advantage and we need to put a stop to it. If we don’t think it’s an influence, then it looks horrible and it erodes public confidence in officiating and we need to stop it. So tell me how we don’t need to stop it. We have to stop it. The coaches have to take the lead and police themselves.”

And to a point, he’s right.

In no other sport is it acceptable for coaches to continually berate officials the way that college basketball coaches do it.

But if you listen to Cronin, there is a reason this happens.

“My beef with that is guys like Mick Cronin and Buzz Williams (of Marquette) of the world, we deal with some of it,” Cronin told ESPN after the game. “When nobody gets in the Jim Boeheim’s face or Mike Krzyzewski’s face.”

“The truth is that in college basketball, it’s not equitable. Coaches are treated differently. Officials in different leagues officiate differently,” Cronin added to SI.com. “If Seth Davis is the coach at New York State and he’s going against Jim Boeheim, his fans feel like they don’t get respect so they blow up the blogs and say they want a veteran coach. You can’t sit there and not make sure you’re getting equality. And by the way, neither can Jim Boeheim. Jim Calhoun didn’t build UConn in the ’80s by letting Rollie, Louis and Big John get all the calls.”

Former coach and current ESPN analyst Dan Dakich agrees with Cronin.

“The biggest little dirty secret in college basketball is when Bowling Green goes to play at Michigan, Michigan and the Big Ten pays officials twice what the MAC does,” Dakich said on ESPN’s Outside The Lines. “Who do you think that official is going to aside with? He’s going to side with the coach at Michigan or the coach at Indiana as it pertains to a MAC coach or a Horizon League coach.”

“Guys want Krzyzewski on their side. Guys want Boeheim on their side. I 1000% agree with what Mick Cronin said. It’s not even close. I used to tell [Bobby Knight], ‘Stand up, we need some travels.'”

Wichita State’s McDuffie testing the NBA draft waters

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Wichita State forward Markis McDuffie entered his name into the NBA draft without signing with an agent, sources told NBC Sports on Tuesday.

It was initially believed that McDuffie would return to Wichita State for his senior season. As a sophomore, McDuffie, a former top 100 recruit, averaged 11.5 points and 5.7 boards, but he played fewer than 20 minutes a night as a junior after missing the first half of the season with a broken foot.

He will be a late-second round pick at best, but is likely to go undrafted if he opts to sign with an agent. He’s expected to return.

The Shockers are already staring down the barrel of a rebuilding season. Two players, including starter Austin Reaves, are transferring out of the program while all-american guard Landry Shamet has already made the decision to enter the draft and sign with an agent. As it currently stands, assuming McDuffie returns, just four scholarship players from this year’s team will play for Wichita State next season: McDuffie, Samajae Haynes-Jones, Asbjorn Midtgaard and Rod Brown.

Jeff Capel lands first commitment as the head coach at Pitt

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Jeff Capel is on the board with his first commitment as the head coach of Pittsburgh.

Trey McGowens, a top 100 prospect in the Class of 2019, announced on his twitter page that he will be enrolling at Pitt as a member of the Class of 2018.

A 6-foot-3 combo-guard, McGowens picked the Panthers over a handful of other high-major programs.

This is not exactly a program changing kind of commitment for Capel. Players that are late-spring commitments are almost always more celebrated because they end up in higher demand when there are fewer players left to fill the holes on rosters around the country. I’m not sure McGowens is all that different, but what’s significant about his commitment is that it’s proof that Capel is, at the very least, going to make some noise on the recruiting trail.

Capel has a long rebuild in front of him, but landing four-star prospects that will help spend a few years in the program are the kind of pieces that he needs at this point, and the kind of pieces that his predecessor was not able to land.

Felder no longer part of South Carolina basketball program

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COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — South Carolina point guard Rakym Felder is no longer part of the Gamecocks basketball team.

Felder, a key freshman reserve for South Carolina’s Final Four team two years ago, was dismissed from the program by coach Frank Martin on Monday.

The 5-foot-10 Felder, from Brooklyn, New York, was suspended last summer after his second arrest in less than a year. Felder was not enrolled last fall. He was allowed to return in the spring semester although he did not play.

Martin said there were guidelines Felder had to follow upon coming back “and unfortunately, he has not met those expectations.”

Martin has not detailed those guidelines for Felder’s return to the court.

Felder had 15 points in South Carolina’s NCAA Tournament win over Duke in 2017

Washington’s Thybulle returning for senior season

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Matisse Thybulle will return to Washington for his senior season after contemplating declaring for the NBA draft following a junior campaign in which he was named the Pac-12 defensive player of the year.

“The NBA is really enticing and it was definitely something that I seriously considered when the season was over,” Thybulle told the Seattle Times. “I talked it over with my family and we came to the conclusion that it would be in my best interest to stay and get my degree (in communications) and grow as a basketball player and take this last year to mature and fine tune everything so I can be fully prepared to take that next step when it’s time.”

The 6-foot-5 guard averaged 11.2 points, 2.9 rebounds, 2.0 assists and 3.0 steals per game last season. He shot 44.5 percent from the field and 36.5 percent from 3-point range.

“I talked to coach (Mike Hopkins) and he gave me some good advice that was honestly something that helped in the grand scheme of things,” Thybulle said. “He told me that if I do it (enter the draft), then I should be all in because that’s what I’m going to be up against is a whole bunch of guys fighting for their lives. He thought it would be a better idea for me to stay in school until I’m at that point.”

Washington is awaiting the decision of Noah Dickerson, who declared for the draft but has not hired an agent. The 6-foot-8 averaged 15.5 points and 8.4 rebounds last season.

Koby McEwen transferring to Marquette

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Steve Wojciechowski added a significant piece to his 2019-20 team over the weekend.

Koby McEwen announced his intention to transfer to Marquette from Utah State late Sunday evening.

“I would like to thank God, my family, inner circle and all the schools/coaches that recruited me during this process!” McEwen tweeted. “With that being said, I’m proud to announce that I’ll be furthering my college career at Marquette University.”

McEwen picked the Golden Eagles over fellow finalists Creighton and Grand Canyon after he decided to transfer when the Aggies announced South Dakota coach Craig Smith was taking over the program last month. The 6-foot-4 guard averaged 15.6 points, 5.4 rebounds and 3.2 assists per game while shooting 40 percent from the field and 30 percent from 3-point range as a sophomore.

After sitting out the upcoming season, McEwen will have to years of eligibility remaining. Marquette went 21-14 last season, but missed the NCAA tournament for the third time in Wojciechowski’s four years in Milwaukee.