Baylor  v Texas Tech

Bubble Banter: Baylor is still in the bubble picture, believe it or not

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There are 31 days left until Selection Sunday. Every morning from now until the bracket comes out, we’ll help you get caught up on the happenings with impact on the bubble from the night before. 

You can see NBCSports.com’s latest bracket here.

This is how you know when we’re starting to get close to bubble season: Baylor (RPI: 58, KenPom: 55) knocks off TCU on the road, and we talk about it like it’s actually a big deal.

Because it actually kind of is.

I know that Baylor entered Wednesday having lost seven of their last eight games. I get that they’re currently sitting at 3-8 in the Big 12 after beating the Horned Frogs. I agree with anyone that wants to say that the Bears are one of the most disappointing teams in the country. But that doesn’t change the fact that a team with a top ten strength of schedule has wins over Colorado, Kentucky and Oklahoma State and that they all came away from Waco.

The Bears are still very much in the thick of the bubble race. They have good wins, they only have one bad loss, and they have five more games against top 40 teams. They need to start winning, obviously, but all is not yet lost.

It might have been if they lost to TCU.

But they didn’t.

Which means that Baylor’s bubble has survived another day.

THE REST OF WEDNESDAY’S BUBBLE ACTION

  • Indiana (RPI: 74, KenPom: 61) blew a big lead against Penn State. They’ve now beaten Michigan and Wisconsin at home, where they’ve also lost to Northwestern and now the Nittany Lions. With a non-conference resume that’s highlighted by a win over Washington (yuck), the Hoosiers are in some trouble.
  • George Washington (RPI: 27, KenPom: 37) lost VCU (RPI: 28, KenPom: 24), which inches the Colonials a bit closer to the bubble But a road loss at a league favorite isn’t exactly a bad thing. GW is still in a good position.
  • LSU (RPI: 59, KenPom: 68) lost to their fourth team outside the top 100 on Wednesday. Wins over Kentucky, Missouri and St. Joseph’s don’t make up for that. The Tigers might need to sneak an upset at Kentucky or at Florida.
  • Stanford (RPI: 42, KenPom: 34) actually has a better profile than I originally thought. The Cardinal have four top 50 wins, three of which came on the road. They’ve only lost two games to teams outside the top 50 — one of them on Wednesday against Washington — but both of those were on the road to teams with an RPI in the 80s. They can’t afford to drop a game to the likes of USC or Wazzu, but this team is in decent shape.
  • Richmond (RPI: 44, KenPom: 63) beat Duquesne, which means they’re still hanging tough despite the fact that they are missing two key players in Derrick Williams and Cedrick Lindsay.
  • Dayton (RPI: 57, KenPom: 56) has beaten Gonzaga, Cal and George Washington. They’ve lost to USC, Rhode Island and Illinois State. That’s the kind of schizophrenic nonsense these bubble resumes are made up of. At least they got their revenge on URI on Wednesday.
  • Cal (RPI: 50, KenPom: 45) didn’t lose to Washington State. That’s the good news. The bad? They got taken to overtime by the worst team in the conference, which means that the issues they’ve dealt with the last couple of weeks aren’t quite figured out. If it wasn’t for that Justin Cobbs jumper to beat Arizona, they’d be in some serious trouble.

Rick Pitino: ‘We should be penalized … but not this team’

Rick Pitino
(AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley)
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One of the biggest storylines of Saturday’s college basketball schedule had everything to do with a team that no longer matters in the championship picture.

Less than 24 hours after being informed that the school would be imposing a postseason ban that will leave the Cardinals out of the ACC and NCAA tournaments, No. 19 Louisville tipped off against Boston College, and they did so without leading scorer Damion Lee, who is battling a knee issue.

How would the team respond to the decision — the despicable, shameful decision — that the university’s president made?

Well, it seems.

The Cardinals jumped out to a 19-2 lead in the first eight minutes and cruised to a 79-47 win over an overmatched Boston College team in the Yum! Center.

And head coach Rick Pitino, after the quote, said exactly what everyone is thinking.

“We should be penalized, no question about it,” he said. “But not this team. But the NCAA didn’t make that decision. We made that decision.”

He’s totally right. The school sacrificed the season — and the only shot that a pair of fifth-year seniors would get to play in the NCAA tournament — to protect the school, the brand and the bottom-line moving forward. Like I said earlier, it’s despicable.

But credit the Cardinals for responding.

Because they still have something on the line. They’re just a game out of first place in the ACC, and while an ACC regular season title isn’t a shot to play in the ACC or NCAA tournament, it’s still a banner that would probably mean more to Damion Lee and Trey Lewis than any league title has meant to a Louisville player before.

Oklahoma State without Jawun Evans, questionable moving forward

Oklahoma State guard Jawun Evans (1) goes up for a shot between Kansas forward Jamari Traylor (31) and forward Perry Ellis (34) in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game in Stillwater, Okla., Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2016. Oklahoma State won 86-67. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
(AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
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Oklahoma State’s star point guard was not in the lineup on Saturday against No. 13 Iowa State.

Evans injured his shoulder in the Cowboys’ loss at Texas Tech on Wednesday and was ruled out of Saturday’s game.

According to the school, his official status moving forward is questionable. The Pokes are just 11-11 on the season and likely need to earn the Big 12’s at-large bid to get into the NCAA tournament. It makes sense to let him get healthy.

Evans was averaging 12.9 points, 4.9 assists and 4.4 boards this season, but he had been arguably the best point guard in the Big 12 during league play, averaging 15.6 points and 5.6 assists.