krzyzewski

Valiant in defeat, No. 17 Duke hurt by lack of interior options

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The hype for Saturday’s game between No. 17 Duke and No. 2 Syracuse was immense, and in situations such as this one it seems near impossible for the matchup to live up to the pre game chatter. But the Blue Devils and Orange lived up to the hype and then some, playing the most exciting 45 minutes of basketball we’ve seen to this point in the season.

C.J. Fair scored the last of his career-high 28 points with a free throw just over five seconds remaining in overtime, giving Syracuse the 91-89 victory and moving the Orange to 21-0 (8-0 ACC). Duke, with its capable three-point shooters, attacked the Syracuse zone in a way that most teams are dissuaded from doing. While they did manage to work the ball inside, scoring 32 points in the paint, the Blue Devils did much of their damage from beyond the arc.

Of Duke’s 72 field goal attempts half of them were three-pointers, with the Blue Devils making 15 of those 36 shots. Those long shots resulted in rebounding opportunities for a Duke team that isn’t deep inside and they took advantage, rebounding nearly 41% of their misses and scoring 22 second-chance points.

Much of that was done by Jabari Parker and Amile Jefferson, who grabbed 11 of those offensive rebounds and proved once again to be the best that Duke has inside when it comes to front court “muscle.” So with this being the case, obviously it was a big deal when both fouled out late in regulation. With those two unavailable head coach Mike Krzyzewski went with his shooters in hopes of getting a mismatch in his favor on the offensive end of the floor.

The problem with this move: there was no one on the floor capable of guarding Jerami Grant.

Grant converted multiple dunks in overtime, with Duke ultimately being forced to bring in Marshall Plumlee for a defensive possession. Plumlee played a total of ten minutes, grabbing two rebounds, as neither he nor Josh Hairston have been able to do enough over the course of ACC play to earn a spot in the rotation. And therein lies the problem for this Duke team when it comes to considering their prospects not only within the ACC but also in regards to their national hopes.

Jefferson’s been very good for Duke over the last 14 games, and against Syracuse the sophomore accounted for 14 points, seven rebounds and five assists. At this point it seems safe to assume that he and Parker (15 points, nine rebounds) will be Duke’s most productive front court players for the remainder of the season. But if this team is to entertain any thoughts of climbing back into the ACC race (remember, they get Syracuse at home in three weeks), they need someone else in the front court to step up and earn minutes.

However with this being the case, do they have a third player capable of doing so? Even with this dilemma Duke nearly left the Carrier Dome with a win, so they clearly can make adjustments. But against teams with the ability to exploit this deficiency, Duke will continue to have issues if a Plumlee or Hairston (or both) doesn’t step up in the coming weeks.

In a game as entertaining as this one, it’s tough to pinpoint an area in which the losing team cost itself the game. But there’s no doubt that Duke’s lack of interior depth impacted their strategy in overtime.

Illinois State ends No. 21 Wichita State’s 12-game win streak

Fred VanVleet
AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki
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Having won 12 straight games, No. 21 Wichita State entered the weekend one of the hottest teams in the country. And with a four-game lead atop the Missouri Valley standings, clinching the regular season title was more a matter of “when” as opposed to “if.” But none of that mattered Saturday night at Illinois State, as the Redbirds managed to hand the Shockers their first conference loss by the final score of 58-53.

In addition to the 12-game win streak, which was second to Stony Brook (15 straight wins), Wichita State also saw its 19-game win streak in Valley regular season games come to an end. Illinois State was the last Valley team to beat Wichita State, eliminating the Shockers in the Arch Madness semifinals last March, and they played with the confidence of a team that believed it could win.

And after a rough first half the Redbirds found a way to come back, erasing a 16-point second half deficit in the process.

Wichita State’s issue in the second half was the fact that they couldn’t make shots. The Shockers shot just 26.7 percent from the field and 1-for-14 from three in the second half, with Fred VanVleet going scoreless and Shaq Morris scoring just one point. And just two players, Ron Baker and Conner Frankamp, managed to make multiple field goals in the game’s final 20 minutes. Illinois State certainly deserves credit for that, as they took away the quality looks Wichita State was able to find in building its lead.

And on the other end of the floor Paris Lee took control of the game during Illinois State’s comeback, scoring 13 of his 19 points in the second half with Deontae Hawkins adding 11 second-half points. Illinois State was even worse from the field, finishing the game shooting just over 27 percent from the field. But they were able to attack the Wichita State defense and get to the foul line, outscoring the Shockers 22-9 from the charity stripe. And in a game in which neither team could get much going offensively, the ability to get points from the line proved to be the difference.

This defeat doesn’t help Wichita State, but did anything really change? Maybe the margin for error when it comes to an at-large bid gets a little smaller with the loss in the eyes of some. But when considering injuries to the likes of VanVleet and Anton Grady in non-conference play, those early season losses are understandable. Saturday was a rough night for Wichita State, but given the maturity and talent on at Gregg Marshall’s disposal the Shockers will be fine moving forward.

VIDEO: New Mexico loses game on blown call by officials

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Nothing like a nice, controversial finish to get the blood flowing.

New Mexico was on the receiving end of a rule misinterpretation on Saturday afternoon, and that interpretation likely cost the Lobos a win over San Diego State and, arguably, a shot at the MWC regular season title.

Here’s the situation: New Mexico is up by three with 12 seconds left and the ball under their own basket. Their allowed to run the baseline, so Craig Neal calls a play where the inbounder throws the ball to a player running out of bounds.

Totally league as long as the player establishes out of bounds before touching the ball. The referee rules that he doesn’t.

Here’s the video:

The problem?

According to the rules, Xavier Adams — the player receiving the pass from Cullen Neal — only needed one foot on the floor out of bounds in order to establish himself as an inbounder that was able to catch that ball. He got one foot down (see the picture above), but the referees appeared to rule that he needed to have both feet down.

That was incorrect, according to the Mountain West office.

“While this was a very close judgment call made at full speed, it has been determined after careful review of slow-motion video replays the call was in fact incorrect,” the league said in a release. “The New Mexico player did get one foot down (two feet are not required) out-of-bounds before receiving the ball, thus establishing his location in accordance NCAA Basketball Playing Rules 4.23.1.a and 7.1.1.  By rule, the officials were not permitted to go to the monitor during the game to review this play.”

And here’s the kicker: When SDSU got the ball back, they hit a three to send the game into overtime, where the Aztecs won. But if New Mexico had won this game, they’d be sitting at 8-2 in MWC play, one game behind SDSU in the loss column with a return game against them in The Pit.

Instead, they’re now three games back with seven to play, meaning that the race is effectively over.

It’s tough to blame the referees here — it was a bang-bang call that is only clear in slow-motion replay — but man, that’s a big call to miss.