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Late Night Snacks: No. 17 Ohio State snaps four-game skid

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GAME OF THE NIGHT: Portland 114, BYU 110 (3OT)

Portland has now beaten both Gonzaga and BYU at home this season, and their win over the Cougars may stand as one of the best games of the season when we reach early April. Tyler Haws, whose 48 points were the most scored in a WCC game since Loyola Marymount great Bo Kimble scored 50 in a game against San Francisco on February 4, 1990 (interestingly, the late Hank Gathers scored 49 in a game against LSU the day prior), tied the game at 80 with 30 seconds remaining in regulation. And his three-pointer with 12 seconds remaining in the first overtime would force a second extra session, only to have Portland’s Bobby Sharp return the favor and force a third extra session.

Sharp scored 27 points off the bench for the Pilots, who also received a 27-point, 18-rebound performance from Thomas van der Mars. In total nine players reached double figures (five for Portland, four for BYU), and if the Cougars are to look at any aspect of this game it would likely be their 9-for-24 night from beyond the arc. Portland outscored them by 15 points from deep, dropping BYU two games behind Gonzaga two days ahead of their meeting in Spokane.

IMPORTANT OUTCOMES

1) No. 17 Ohio State 62, Illinois 55

Both teams entered the game with four-game losing streaks but it was Ohio State who made enough shots in the end. LaQuinton Ross scored 14 of his 18 points after halftime and Lenzelle Smith Jr. snapped out of his six-game slump by hitting four of his eight three-point attempts. As for Illinois they need to get Rayvonte Rice, who missed all eight of his shot attempts and went scoreless, back on track.

2) Washington 80, Oregon 76

A C.J. Wilcox three-pointer in the game’s final minute sealed the deal for Washington, who handed the Ducks their fifth consecutive loss. Wilcox hit five of his six three-point attempts and scored 23 points to lead the Huskies, who shot 57.8% from the field. Joseph Young scored 18 to lead Oregon but the struggles of the other starters combined with more defensive woes resulted in yet another defeat.

3) Mercer 68, FGCU 55

In a matchup of the top two teams in the Atlantic Sun the home standing Bears gained a small measure of revenge for last season’s A-Sun tournament final with a 13-point victory in Macon. Langston Hall led the way with 18 points and 11 assists for Mercer, which limited FGCU to 35% shooting from the field and 1-for-17 from beyond the arc. Bernard Thompson scored 21 to lead the way for the Eagles but needed 18 attempts to do so.

STARRED

1) Tyler Haws (BYU) and Thomas van der Mars (Portland) 

Haws scored 48 points (17-for-34 FG, 10-for-13 FT) for the Cougars, only to fall at Portland in triple overtime with van der Mars putting up 27 points (9-for-14 FG) and 18 rebounds (ten offensive).

2) Tyler Harvey (Eastern Washington)

Harvey set a new Big Sky record by going 20-for-20 from the foul line in the Eagles’ 90-83 win over Southern Utah. Harvey finished the game with 36 points and eight rebounds.

3) R.J. Hunter (Georgia State)

Hunter scored 33 points and grabbed seven rebounds in the Panthers’ 77-70 win at Louisiana.

STRUGGLED

1) Rayvonte Rice (Illinois)

Rice went scoreless in Illinois’ 62-55 loss at No. 17 Ohio State, shooting 0-for-8 from the field.

2) UCF

In their 69-51 loss at No. 15 Cincinnati the Knights managed to shoot 6-for-17 from the foul line.  

3) Chasson Randle (Stanford) 

While he did finish with 14 points, six rebounds and four assists Randle shot 3-for-16 from the field in the Cardinal’s 91-74 loss at UCLA.

NOTABLES

  • No. 1 Arizona scored 18 of the first 22 points in their 69-57 win over Colorado, with the final margin not being an indication of the difference between the two teams.
  • Also in Pac-12 play Arizona State ended its four-game skid with a 79-75 win over Utah, giving older brother Jordan Bachynski temporary bragging rights over younger brother Dallin. Jahii Carson led the Sun Devils with 23 points and eight rebounds.
  • Neil Watson scored 28 points to lead Southern Miss to a 75-60 win at Old Dominion, handing the Monarchs their first Conference USA defeat.
  • Sir’Dominic Pointer’s defense in the final seconds preserved a 77-76 win over Seton Hall for St. John’s, the Red Storm’s first Big East win this season.
  • First-year head coach Will Wade has Chattanooga rolling right now, as the Mocs moved to 7-0 in SoCon play with an 84-63 win over preseason favorite Elon.
  • Craig Bradshaw scored 24 points in Belmont’s 80-66 win over Morehead State, moving to 6-1 in OVC play as a result.
  • Despite 28 points and 11 rebounds from Javon McCrea, Buffalo was upset 71-68 at Bowling Green with their three-point shooting (1-for-14) being one of the reasons why.
  • Northern Colorado made 11 of its 16 three-pointers in an 87-72 win over Northern Arizona, moving to 6-1 in Big Sky play.
  • Tony Parker scored 22 points and grabbed seven rebounds to help lead UCLA to their 91-74 win over Stanford.

THE REST OF THE TOP 25

Northwestern finds new home for 2017-18

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Northwestern has found a temporary home while its arena undergoes a nine-figure renovation.

The Wildcats will play the 2017-18 season at Allstate Arena, about 15 miles west of Evanston, Ill. in Rosemont, the school announced Tuesday.

“We are excited to partner with Allstate Arena to host Northwestern men’s basketball games during the 2017-18 season while Welsh-Ryan Arena is undergoing its renovation,” Northwestern vice president for athletics and recreation Jim Phillips said in a statement. “The venue has a rich college basketball tradition in the Chicagoland area. I know that our fans will enjoy cheering on our team at Allstate Arena during what will be an exciting season.”

Allstate Arena previously had been home to DePaul, which is moving into its own new building this year. Capacity is around 18,000 for basketball.

Northwestern had its best season under coach Chris Collins last year, going 20-12 overall and 8-10 in the Big Ten.

The renovation to Welsh-Ryan Arena will bring the building – which opened in 1952 and last renovated in 1983 – into the 21st century by replacing wood bleachers, widening concourses, adding concessions, improving arena technology and adding new locker rooms at the cost of at least $110 million.

Construction is slated to begin in spring of 2017 and be completed in the fall of 2018.

George Washington tabs Maurice Joseph interim head coach

GW Athletics
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George Washington announced on Tuesday that Maurice Joseph has been named interim head coach for the 2016-17 season.

“I am eager and well prepared to begin this journey with the 13 student-athletes in our locker room and the tight-knit group of coaches that I will rely upon heavily,” said Joseph. “It is a distinct honor to have the opportunity to be a mentor to our team in this new role. I have the utmost confidence that I will validate the trust that Provost Maltzman and Patrick Nero have placed in me, and that we will deliver a product that makes our students, alumni and fans across the globe proud of GW Basketball and the university.”

Joseph has been a part of the GW coaching staff for the last five years, a full-time assistant for the last three.

He takes over for Mike Lonergan, who coached Joseph for three years at Vermont. Lonergan was fired two weeks ago stemming from an investigation into allegations of abuse.

Lonergan’s other two assistants, Hajj Turner and Carmen Marciariello, both were interviewed for the position as well, according to sources. Turner had been Lonergan’s associate head coach for the past five years, since Lonergan took over at GW.

“In his five years at GW, Maurice has shown himself to be selflessly dedicated to the success of our student-athletes and fully committed to our department and university,” said Nero, GW’s athletic director. “His leadership ability and basketball acumen will bring focus and stability to the talented team we have this year. Our team, basketball staff and athletic department are looking forward to working together for a successful season.”

2016-17 CBT Expert Picks

WASHINGTON, DC - MARCH 10:  Head coach Mike Krzyzewski hugs Grayson Allen #3 of the Duke Blue Devils after he fouled out against the Notre Dame Fighting Irish during their 84-79 overtime loss during the quarterfinals of the 2016 ACC Basketball Tournament Verizon Center on March 10, 2016 in Washington, DC.  (Photo by Rob Carr/Getty Images)
Rob Carr/Getty Images
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We are now less than six weeks away from the start of the college basketball season, which means that it is time for us to officially get our picks on the record.

Here, our four writers pick who we think will win each league, the national title and the major awards:

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CBT Podcast: Listen as we put together the NBC Sports Preseason All-American Team

LOUISVILLE, KY - MARCH 26:  Josh Hart #3 of the Villanova Wildcats reacts in the second half against the Kansas Jayhawks during the 2016 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament South Regional at KFC YUM! Center on March 26, 2016 in Louisville, Kentucky.  (Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)
Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images
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We figured that it wasn’t enough just to simply list out who was on our All-America teams and who was our National Player of the Year, not when the decision is so wide open. Not when there are so many worthwhile candidates.

So while you can go and see the NBCSports.com Preseason All-American team here and you can read our feature story on Duke’s Grayson Allen, the NBCSports.com Preseason National Player of the Year, here, you can also listen along as we try to hash out just who we wanted slotted in which spot.

Because we recorded it all on a podcast.

As always, you can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, Stitcher, Audioboom or anywhere else that podcasts are given away for free.

If you enjoy what you hear on this podcast, please rate and review the podcast, as it will help us reach more listeners.

Thanks for listening!

MORE: 2016-17 Season Preview Coverage | Conference Previews | Preview Schedule

NBCSports.com 2016-17 Preseason All-American Team

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PRESEASON NATIONAL PLAYER OF THE YEAR: Grayson Allen, Duke

Picking the Preseason National Player of the Year this season was not an easy thing to do. This year’s freshman class will rival the Class of 2013 — Andrew Wiggins, Julius Randle, Aaron Gordon, etc. — in terms of overall talent, and there are a number of newcomers entering into a situation in which they should be able to shine. Hell, there are two potential No. 1 picks and a third projected lottery pick on Duke’s roster this season, and none of them are named Grayson Allen.

But the reason we picked all for this award is actually pretty simple: He’s the best player on the best team in the country. Don’t believe me? Think about this: As a sophomore, his first season playing consistent minutes at the collegiate level, Allen averaged 21.6 points, 4.6 boards and 3.5 assists while posting a 61.6 true shooting percentage. That hasn’t been done by a high major basketball player since 1993, which is as far back as the CBB Reference database has statistics. As far as I know, it’s never happened before by a player at the high major level. For comparison’s sake, when Damian Lillard was a senior at Weber State, he was one of the three other players to post those stats.

And Allen did it while playing in a conference that sent six teams to the Sweet 16 and two to the Final Four last season.

You may hate him, but you cannot deny that the kid can flat out play.

RELATED: A Different Shade of Grayson

Washingtons Markelle Fultz, USA Basketball
Washingtons Markelle Fultz, USA Basketball

FIRST TEAM ALL-AMERICA

Markelle Fultz, Washington: Fultz was one of just two other guys that we truly considered for Preseason Player of the Year. He’s the current favorite to be the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft and, given Washington’s uptempo style of play, he has a chance to post massive numbers. The biggest question mark here is whether or not the Huskies are going to be good enough to dance; to win the award on a team that’s not a national title contender is hard to do. It’s only happened three times in the last two decades, and all three of those winners — Doug McDermott, Jimmer Fredette and Kevin Durant — averaged more than 26 points. McDermott and Fredette were on teams that earned No. 3 seeds in the NCAA tournament.

Josh Hart, Villanova: Hart was the third player to get serious consideration for National Player of the Year. He’s the guy that is most likely to have a Buddy Hield-esque, breakout senior season. As a junior with the Wildcats, Hart averaged a team-high 15.5 points and 6.8 boards, playing an integral role in Villanova’s small-ball attack. His ability to attack the glass and playing bigger than his 6-foot-5 frame will be even more important for Jay Wright’s club this season as they deal with a lack of size on the interior, but the key for Hart’s long-term future will be his three-point shooting. He made 35.7 percent of his threes last season and 46.4 percent the season before, but that was on relatively limited attempts and his flat shot and awkward release makes it tough to project him as a floor-spacer at the next level. Did he put in the work this offseason to make a jump the way Hield did last season?

Josh Jackson, Kansas: Jackson was ranked the No. 1 prospect in the Class of 2016 by a number of outlets, and there are still people that believe he’ll eventually be the best NBA player out of this group. A freak athlete like Andrew Wiggins, Jackson is a bit more polished and a whole lot tougher than Wiggins was a freshman. It’s not crazy to think that he can match Wiggins’ output (17.7 points, 5.9 boards, nation’s top perimeter defender), and considering Kansas is a preseason top five team, that puts him firmly in the All-America discussion. But here’s what will limit him: If Carlton Bragg makes the improvement many expect him to, Jackson’s offense may be cut into, and considering there are a pair of alpha-dogs that will be the guys called on to make big shots in key moments, it’s hard to see him having any “Wooden Moments”.

Ivan Rabb, California: We went with Rabb as the nation’s best big man this season. Like Fultz, Rabb could end up playing on a team that doesn’t reach the NCAA tournament. That’s concerning, but there’s a real chance that Rabb could end up averaging 18 points and 10 boards this season. Last season as a freshman, he averaged 12.6 points and 8.5 boards playing as a tertiary option on the offensive end. He would have been a lottery pick had he opted to declare for June’s NBA Draft.

TCU guard Michael Williams (2) defends as Iowa State guard Monte Morris (11) leaps to the basket for a shot in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game, Saturday, Jan. 23, 2016, in Fort Worth, Texas. Morris had 18 points and six assists and No. 19 Iowa State followed a win over top-ranked Oklahoma with a 73-60 victory over TCU on Saturday. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)
Iowa State guard Monte Morris (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

SECOND TEAM ALL-AMERICA

Monte’ Morris, Iowa State: Morris is in an interesting situation this season. For the past three years, he’s defined himself as the model of point guard efficiency, a facilitator who makes big shots when he has to but who excelled as running a team and creating for the guys around him. This year? That talent around him is depleted, meaning Morris will be asked to become more of a volume scorer. We expect him to embrace that role and excel in it.

Dennis Smith Jr., N.C. State: Smith tore his ACL last August, forcing him to miss his senior season of high school. But the injury meant that he was able to graduate high school early, enroll in college in January and spend the majority of his rehab time doing so with the Wolfpack trainers. The result? He’s returned from the injury as good as new, which is important considering the fact that so much of what makes Smith dangerous is his explosiveness. A potential top five pick, Smith is talented enough that he could take a perennially under-achieving team to the NCAA tournament.

Nigel Williams-Goss, Gonzaga: You may not recognize this name. A former top 30 recruit, Williams-Goss transferred out of Washington after an all-Pac 12 season as a sophomore. He sat out last year as a transfer and will step in to the starting point guard role this season. Gonzaga lost Kyle Wiltjer and Domas Sabonis, but with the talent they have returning — and becoming eligible this season — the Zags have the look of a top ten team, and we expect Williams-Goss to be their engine.

Austin Nichols, Virginia: Nichols is going to be the star for this year’s Virginia team, which is once again a contender for the ACC title. As a sophomore at Memphis, the former McDonald’s All-American averaged 13.4 points, 6.7 boards and 3.4 blocks. He spent last season redshirting at Virginia and learning the system, which he is a perfect fit for. He’s a better big man that Anthony Gill, and Anthony Gill was one of the most underrated players in the country last season.

Thomas Bryant, Indiana: Bryant is another guy that had a chance to be a first round pick last season but opted to return to school. He had a promising first year in Bloomington, but it came with typical freshman mistakes: He was lost early in the year, especially on the defensive end. But Bryant has the tools, he plays extremely hard and he’s young for his grade; he was born five months after Josh Jackson.

Oregon forward Dillon Brooks (AP Photo/John Locher)

THIRD TEAM ALL-AMERICA

Dillon Brooks, Oregon: Health is the big question with Brooks, and the reason that he’s a third-teamer instead of being in contention for the first team. Brooks has a foot injury, one that Oregon has already said could keep him out at the start of the season. If healthy, he’s a junior that averaged 16.7 points, 5.4 boards and 3.1 assists last season for a preseason top five team.

Jaron Blossomgame, Clemson: Blossomgame had a chance to leave college and head to the NBA Draft this spring, but he opted to return to school for his senior season. Blossomgame is certainly talented enough to be on this list — he averaged 18.7 points last season — but without the hype of a guy like Smith or Fultz, will he be able to get the Tigers to be a good enough team that people will play attention to him?

Jayson Tatum, Duke: The Blue Devils are the most talented team in the country, and trying to predict where production is going to come from in that offense is tough. Tatum is one of the best pure scorers in college basketball this season, but there’s a real possibility he could end up being the third or fourth leading scorer on this team. The good news? Jabari Parker and Brandon Ingram thrived in the role he’ll play. The bad news? Harry Giles III may be the best player on Duke come March.

Alec Peters, Valparaiso: Peters is the best player at the mid-major level in the country, a kid that graduated from school in three years and had the chance to leave for literally any other program in the country. He didn’t. He opted to stay at Valpo, where he’ll be the centerpiece of new head coach Matt Lottich’s offense. It’s not crazy to think he could average 23 points.

Bam Adebayo, Kentucky: Who is going to be Kentucky’s leading scorer this season? It’s tough to figure out, right? Our money is on Adebayo, their 6-foot-10 center. He’s a freak athletically with more of a face-up game than he gets credit for. Given the lack of perimeter shooting for the Wildcats this season, Adebayo will be asked to carry much of the load.

Bam Adebayo (Photo by Roberto Serra/Iguana Press/Getty Images)
Kentucky’s Bam Adebayo (Photo by Roberto Serra/Iguana Press/Getty Images)