Late Night Snacks: Michigan State, Kentucky win at home

Leave a comment

GAME OF THE NIGHT: No. 3 Michigan State 71, Indiana 66

This was an important game for the Hoosiers and after one half, led Michigan State — without Adreian Payne — with a one-point lead. In the second half, Gary Harris took over scoring 20 of his 24 points in the second half.


No. 14 Kentucky 68, Texas A&M 51Last season the Aggies picked up a win on the Rupp Arena floor. This time, Kentucky handed Texas A&M a 68-51 conference loss. Alex Poythress had himself a night, scoring a season-high 16 points and added five rebounds. Julius Randle ended with a double-double of 13 points and 11 boards.

LSU 77, Missouri 71: Despite 28 points from Jabari Brown and taking the lead with under four minutes to play, Missouri still didn’t have enough to leave Baton Rouge with an SEC victory. Jordan Mickey and Anthony Hickey connected on field goals and free throws down the stretch for LSU.

New Mexico 84, Boise State 75The Lobos benefitted from an early start, and first half shooting woes from the Broncos to build a double-digit halftime lead. In the second half, Boise State tried to dig itself out of its first half hole, cutting the lead to seven twice, getting it as close as five. But Boise State couldn’t make the shots down the stretch, while Hugh Greenwood and Cameron Bairstow did for New Mexico.


1) DeAndre Daniels and Shabazz Napier, UConn: combined for 58 points, 19 rebounds, and six assists in Connecticut’s drubbing of Temple, 90-66.

2) Cameron Bairstow, New Mexico: The Lobos got off to a hot start, and throughout the game Bairstow was a constant presence. The New Mexico forward iced the game with a transition layup after the Lobos beat the Boise State press. 

3) Ian Miller, Florida State: While Aaron Thomas led the Seminoles with 20 points, Miller did his best Michael Snear impression with a floater with four second left to survive a rally from Notre Dame.


1) Harvard: The Crimson lost to Florida Atlantic tonight 68-53, in a game that was as ugly as the score may indicate. The Crimson shot a paltry 23% FG (14-61). Given that they don’t have a very strong resume to begin with, an at-large bid — if necessary — was slim, and tonight’s loss all but clinches that they must win the Ivy League championship.

2) Clemson: The Pitt Panthers 56 percent to Clemson’s 32 and 53 percent from deep compared to the Tigers’ 21. The end result was a 76-43 road loss. Talib Zanna, Lamar Patterson and Cameron Wright outscored the entire Clemson team by four.

3) Willie Cauley-Stein, Kentucky: In the last three games for Kentucky, Cauley Stein has put up a combined three points, off 1-for-9 shooting, with 10 rebounds and two blocks. On Tuesday night he went for one point and one rebound.

TOP 25


  • Connecticut 90, Temple 66
  • Wright State 73, Milwaukee 57
  • SMU 70, Rutgers 56
  • Florida State 76, Notre Dame 74
  • Providence 65, Butler 56
  • Georgia Tech 68, Boston College 60

Michigan’s hot shooting carries them into the Elite Eight past Texas A&M

Ezra Shaw/Getty Images
1 Comment

Historically known as a team that lived and died with the three-ball, No. 3-seed Michigan had spent the first weekend of the NCAA tournament proving history wrong.

In an ugly game in their opener against Montana, the Wolverines shot 5-for-16 from three while turning the ball over 14 times and managing a measly 61 points. Against Houston in the second round, Michigan shot 8-for-30 from beyond the arc, with one of those threes coming courtesy of Jordan Poole at the buzzer, sending the Wolverines into the Sweet 16 with a 64-63 win.

Put another way, Michigan looked the part of the defensive grinder that they turned into this season.

Against No. 7-seed Texas A&M in the Sweet 16, however, the Wolverines turned into the Golden State Warriors.

Michigan bested the number of three that they had made in the tournament to date, hitting 14-of-24 bombs while shooting 62 percent from the floor in a 99-72 win over an Aggies team that had finally, for the first time since November, looked the part of the SEC title contender that they have the talent to be.

No. 11 Loyola moves on to Elite Eight after beating No. 7 Nevada

Getty Images
1 Comment

Loyola is in the Elite Eight.

The Ramblers’ dream run through March continued Thursday as they knocked off No. 7 Nevada, 69-68, in South Region semifinal in Atlanta.

Loyola, an 11th seed making its first NCAA tournament appearance since 1985, will play the winner of Kansas State and Kentucky on Sunday for a chance to return to the Final Four for the first time since it won the 1963 national championship.

Marques Townes hit a 3-pointer with under 10 seconds to play to put the Ramblers up four and put the game all but out of reach for Nevada. Townes finished with 18 points while Clayton Custer had 15.  Loyola shot 55.8 percent from the floor for the game.

The Wolf Pack’s Caleb Martin had 21 points while Jordan Caroline had 19. Nevada shot 41.4 percent from the floor.

Nevada looked like it may overwhelm Loyola early as it built a 12-point lead less than seven minutes into the game. The Ramblers, though, struck back by keeping the Wolf Pack off the board for nearly the last 8 minutes of the first half to take a four-point lead into the break.

The strong play considered on the other side of halftime for Loyola, which astonishingly made its first 13 shots of the second half. Still, despite the perfect start, the Ramblers only briefly took a double-digit lead before Nevada sliced it back down below 10.

Loyola’s inability to build a substantial lead came back to bite it as Nevada, the comeback kids of this tournament, mounted its attack on the deficit and had it erased before the under-four timeout, setting up the final frantic minutes of a battle for a spot in the Elite Eight that the Ramblers claimed thanks to Townes’ late triple.

2018 March Madness: Fans in Times Square pick fake teams in Sweet 16 predictions

Leave a comment

NBC Sports went into Times Square this week to ask basketball fans for their Sweet 16 picks.

The only problem?

The teams in the games are not actually playing in the NCAA Tournament.

They aren’t even actually teams.

Hilarity ensued.

Miami’s Bruce Brown declares for draft without an agent

Photo by Al Bello/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Bruce Brown wants to hear what the NBA has to say.

The Miami sophomore has declared for the draft but will not hire an agent, the school announced Thursday.

The 6-foot-5 guard averaged 11.4 points, 7.5 rebounds and 4.0 assists per game during his second season with the Hurricanes. He did, though, see his shooting numbers take a tumble compared to his freshman season with his field goal percentage down from 45.9 to 41.5 percent and his 3-point shoot go from 34.7 to 26.7 percent. There’s also the matter of a foot injury that required surgery and kept him off the floor for the ‘Canes’ last 12 games.

By declaring for the draft, Brown can get in front of NBA teams, who will likely take a very close look at his shooting mechanics after that sophomore season downturn. It will also be an opportunity for him to build up his reputation in the professional ranks after spending much of his sophomore season injured.

Big East makes its rules recommendations in wake of FBI probe

Mike Stobe/Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Big East has ideas.

The conference on Thursday unveiled its recommendations to change college basketball in the wake of the federal investigation of corruption that resulted in 10 initial arrests and general tumult across the sport.

Among the recommendations are allowing players to go pro out of high school but requiring those who go to college to stay there at least two seasons.  They also posit increased regulation of agents, shoe companies and its own members as well as a changed recruiting calendar and more coordination with USA Basketball.

These all seem well-intentioned, but probably not destined for implementation or success.

First off, the age limit that creates one-and-dones is an NBA rule, and no matter what lobbying the NCAA does, they’re not likely to change it on college’s behalf. Any change there will come at the behest of the National Basketball Players Association. The only real leverage the NCAA has on this front would be to declare freshmen ineligible as they once were, but that seems incredibly unlikely. The idea was floated a few years back, but felt entirely like a bluff.

Even if the NCAA somehow mandated players spend at least two seasons on campus, that seems incredibly anti-player. Trae Young probably wouldn’t have left Norman North High School after his senior year, but it would be silly to make him stay another season at Oklahoma if he didn’t want to after the year he just had. Going to college helped Young’s draft stock, but staying there would almost certainly hurt him.

Players that play their way into a multi-million future being made to stick around and play for free for an extra year doesn’t seem to be a viable solution in 2018. Beyond being anti-player on its face, it could fuel even more negative consequences for players who feel they are fringe candidates. Instead of just going to school for a year and proving themselves, some players may just decide they don’t want to risk being there for two years and declare, essentially, a year early.

It also is worth noting that the same document that calls for shoe company influence to be curtailed while also bringing in USA Basketball, which is very intertwined with Nike, is…interesting.

At the end of the day, these recommendations address symptoms – and probably not that well – rather than the root cause, which is amateurism. As long as players, who clearly, literally and inarguably have value beyond their scholarship, are unable to cash in on their skills, there will be people willing to pay them surreptitiously.

It’s hard to “clean up the game” when the “dirty money” isn’t going anywhere.