Late Night Snacks: No. 9 Iowa State, two other ranked teams fall

Leave a comment

GAME OF THE DAY: No. 6 Wichita State 72, Missouri State (OT) 

Wichita State trailed by as many as 19 points in the second half but Gregg Marshall’s team refused to lie down, with Fred VanVleet scoring 12 of the Shockers’ final 13 points to cap the comeback. Cleanthony Early tallied 22 points and 14 rebounds to lead the way for Wichita State, which is now 17-0 on the season.


1) Oklahoma 87, No. 9 Iowa State 82

And then there were four. Oklahoma knocked the Cyclones from the ranks of the unbeaten on Saturday afternoon, with Buddy Hield leading four double-digit scorers with 22 points and Ryan Spangler posting a 16-point, 15-rebound double-double. DeAndre Kane scored 23 points to lead all scorers but Iowa State shot just 6-for-26 from beyond the arc. And of greater concern with a game against No. 18 Kansas scheduled for Monday night is the sprained ankle suffered by Kane in the game’s final minute.

2) Clemson 72, No. 16 Duke 59 

The Blue Devils dropped to 1-2 in ACC play with a disappointing loss at Clemson, with K.J. McDaniels being the best player on the floor. The Clemson wing accounted for 24 points, ten rebounds and three blocks on the afternoon, and defensively the Tigers limited Duke to 33.9% shooting from the field. Next up for Duke: a home game Monday night against Virginia.

3) No. 10 Florida 84, Arkansas 82 (OT)

With leading scorer Casey Prather out due to swelling in his knee Florida’s trip to Fayetteville became even tougher, and they needed a late basket from Scottie Wilbekin to force overtime before winning in the extra session. Wilbekin would score 18 off the bench and Dorian Finney-Smith added a game-high 22 to go along with 15 rebounds to lead the way for the Gators. Rashad Madden led four Razorback starters in double figures with 23 points.


1) D.J. Balentine (Evansville)

Balentine played all 40 minutes in Evansville’s 75-69 win at Southern Illinois, scoring 33 points to go along with six rebounds and five assists.

2) Alan Williams (UCSB)

Williams posted 33 points and 15 rebounds in the Gauchos’ 72-64 loss to Cal Poly.

3) Patrick Miller (Tennessee State) 

Miller tallied 37 points, seven assists, four rebounds and three steals in the Tigers’ 98-97 loss to Southeast Missouri State.


1) N.C. State

The Wolfpack shot 28.9% in their 76-45 home loss to Virginia, with leading scorer T.J. Warren limited to four points on 1-for-9 shooting.

2) UL Monroe

The Warhawks shot 26.4% from the field in their 61-36 home loss to Texas State, scoring just nine points in the second half.

3) Albany

Shot 29.8% from the field and finished with more turnovers (18) than made field goals (14) in their 68-38 loss at Vermont.


  • Markel Brown’s three-pointer with 11 seconds remaining proved to be the difference as No. 11 Oklahoma State won 73-72 at West Virginia. Brown hadn’t made a three-pointer in nearly a month.
  • With Adreian Payne sidelined with a foot injury No. 5 Michigan State needed overtime to beat Minnesota, with Keith Appling and Gary Harris combining to score 43 points in the Spartans’ 86-75 victory.
  • No. 18 Kansas rolled in-state rival No. 25 Kansas State 86-60 in Lawrence, with Andrew Wiggins scoring 22 points and Wayne Selden adding 20 for the victors.
  • A Markel Starks three-pointer forced overtime for Georgetown in its game at Butler, with the Hoyas winning 70-67 at Hinkle Fieldhouse. The result drops the Bulldogs to 0-4 in Big East play.
  • Texas A&M came back from a 14-point deficit to win 57-56 at Tennessee, with an Antwan Space three-pointer with 4.4 seconds remaining giving the Aggies their lone lead of the game.
  • Cole Huff scored 16 points and Deonte Burton added 14 as Nevada moved to 4-0 in Mountain West play with their 62-54 win over Utah State.
  • Justin Cobbs scored all 20 of his points in the second half to lead Cal to an 88-83 win at Oregon State. The win moved Cal to 3-0 in Pac-12 play, and this is the first time since 1957 that the Golden Bears have opened league play with three road wins since 1957.
  • A Larry Nance Jr. basket with 1.6 seconds remaining gave Wyoming a 52-50 win at Boise State.
  • With 11:40 remaining in the game BYU led Loyola Marymount 60-58. Final score: BYU 91, LMU 68, with Tyler Haws scoring 31 points to lead the way.


Michigan State playing zone? It’s possible

Tom Izzo
Associated Press
Leave a comment

Throughout Tom Izzo’s tenure at Michigan State the team’s half-court man-to-man defense has been a staple, and the Spartans have generally proven difficult to have a high rate of offensive success against. The reliance on that defense is why Izzo’s conversations earlier this summer about using some token full-court pressure due to the shortening of the shot clock caught some people off-guard.

According to the Detroit Free Press there’s another wrinkle the Spartans may use, and it’s likely that this wrinkle will show up more often than the full-court press. During Friday’s opening practice the Spartans worked on a 2-3 zone, and Izzo wants his assistants to make sure the team works on the defense consistently throughout the season.

That’s also why zone in general isn’t going to get heavy play at MSU, but having it as a tool could be beneficial — especially in games with touch fouls on the perimeter called in droves.

“I told (my assistant coaches): ‘You hold me accountable to working on it every day some’ … I have a tendency to drift off on that, and I don’t want to drift off on it,” Izzo said of the 2-3 zone. “But we will be, rest assured, a 90-some percent man-to-man team still and hopefully take some of those principles to zone.”

As noted in the story one of the risks in using pressure is allowing quality shots, which is why it’s unlikely that Michigan State will go to it. But even with Izzo vowing that his team will work on the zone, that doesn’t mean they’ll be playing it as often as Syracuse does.

Man-to-man has been Michigan State’s staple and it will continue to be. But it doesn’t hurt to look for other ways to keep opponents from getting the looks they want, especially if teams have five fewer seconds to find those shots.

Virginia used 3-on-3 to adjust to new shot clock

Malcolm Brogdon
Associated Press
Leave a comment

When the college basketball rules committee made the decision to trim the shot clock down to 30 second from 35, one reason for the switch was the desire to improve offensive production. With offensive numbers at their lowest point in years, proponents of the move see the shot clock change as a necessary move if scoring is to improve.

Whether or not that winds up being the case will be seen throughout the upcoming season, but teams are still having to make adjustments during the preseason.

Virginia, which has played at a snail’s pace (and with great success, mind you) in recent years, made some adjustments to their summer work in anticipation of playing with a 30-second shot clock. One adjustment was more games of 3-on-3 with a 15-second shot clock, which forced all involved to be more decisive in their offensive decision-making.

While the pack-line defense will always be a staple of Tony Bennett’s teams, the feeling in Charlottesville is that they’ve got the offensive firepower needed to both play faster and be more efficient offensively than they were in 2014-15 (29th nationally in adjusted offensive efficiency per Ken Pomeroy). One of the players who will lead the way is senior guard Malcolm Brogdon, who led the team in scoring and was a first team All-ACC selection, and he discussed the team’s outlook with Mike Barber of the Richmond Times-Dispatch.

And even though Anderson’s highlight-reel shot blocking was the thing that frequently fueled fast-breaks for U.Va. last season, Brogdon and [Anthony] Gill said they expect this year’s team to actually push the tempo even more.

“I think we’re going to be a team that gets out and runs more,” Brogdon said. “I think we’ll have three guards on the floor, most of the time, will be able to handle the ball as a point guard and get out in transition. I think we’ll play a lot faster.”

Brogdon and Gill are two of the team’s three returning starters with point guard London Perrantes being the other, and the Cavaliers also return most of their reserves from last year’s rotation. That experience will help them on both ends of the floor as they prepare for a run at a third straight ACC regular season title. And in theory it also allows them to extend themselves a bit more offensively than they did a season ago.