If college hoops had the BCS, who would you want in the National Title game?

1 Comment

Jameis Winston and Florida State beat Auburn for the BCS National Title on Monday night in one of the most thrilling football games that you’ll ever see.

Was it the best ever?

I’m probably the wrong person to ask, but I feel comfortable saying that there has never been a national title game that was markedly better than last night’s. It got me to thinking: if you could pick a matchup for the NCAA Tournament Title game right now, who would it be and why? Our panel answered. You can chime in in the comments:

Raphielle Johnson: Arizona vs. Syracuse.

This would be the ideal title game matchup right now if we were to go with a BCS-style game. Why? These are two of the most talented teams in the country, and they’ve backed it up with results as well.

While Arizona may not have the deepest rotation, head coach Sean Miller does have the pieces needed to attack just about any system they’ll encounter. And for as much as their need for a consistent perimeter shooter has been discussed, they’re still a Top 25 team in adjusted offensive efficiency per kenpom.com. Defensively their work has been excellent to this point in the season, and it helps to have athletes such as Nick Johnson, Rondae Hollis-Jefferson, and Brandon Ashley when it comes to defending. As for Syracuse Jim Boeheim’s team put forth an uncharacteristic performance against Miami on Saturday, which is a credit to the Hurricanes more than an indictment of the Orange. Tyler Ennis has been one of the nation’s best point guards, and forwards C.J. Fair and Jerami Grant have done what was expected of them when the season began. The combination of talent and depth makes Syracuse a logical selection for this game.

Scott Phillips: Kansas vs. Kentucky

I’ll preface this by saying that I want to see the two teams playing the best ball in the country facing each other for the NCAA title, I just hope that it happens to be Kansas and Kentucky because they’re the two most talented teams I’ve seen play this season. No disrespect to the other top contenders that are playing better ball than the Jayhawks and Wildcats, but they don’t boast the type of talent that these two teams possess. Can you imagine the intrigue around the storylines? Wiggins in the title game. Kentucky’s freshmen trying to prove everyone wrong. Embiid vs. Cauley-Stein in the post. Self vs. Calipari. Now wrap your mind around those four incredible storylines for a second and realize that none of the four even intertwined. This would be a matchup for the ages; two titans of college basketball colliding with the best talent in the country on the floor. Hardcore fans, casual fans; they’d all tune in for this one. And it would hopefully be a hell of a game.

Terrence Payne: Florida vs. Syracuse

Personally, after going through the preseason debate of Michigan State or Kentucky for the No. 1 spot, I’d like to see a national title between the Spartans and Wildcats, to have that initial argument come full circle. Even though they played a week into the season. I’m not sure will see a rematch. I’m going with Florida and Syracuse as my ideal national championship. The Gators look the part of the contender as they get players back in the lineup (still waiting on Chris Walker) and as they begin to mesh as a team. The Orange still have key pieces from last season’s Final Four team in addition to point guard Tyler Ennis, who’s playing as well as any freshman in the nation. Maybe I’m wrong, but the ACC-SEC battle seemed to work last night in the BCS Championship Game, right?

Rob Dauster: Arizona vs. Michigan State

There’s been a lot of talk here about so-and-so being the two best teams in the country, and it’s all been wrong.


Because Arizona and Michigan State are the two best teams in the country, at least right now. That could end up changing if some of these super-talented freshmen turn into super-human basketball players in the next three months, but as of today, the matchup this is the matchup that I would most look forward to.

Think about it: there may not be two better game-planners and in-game coaches that Sean Miller and Tom Izzo, which is saying a lot considering the quality of coaching at the top level of college basketball. Nick Johnson is one of the nation’s best defenders, and he’ll be locked-up with the now-healthy Gary Harris, creating a matchup almost as intriguing as watching two of the nation’s most physically-gifted players in Aaron Gordon and Branden Dawson square off. Brandon Ashley and Adreian Payne will spend 40 minutes trying to out-face-up-game each other, while the key to the game could end up being the play of the point guards (Keith Appling and T.J. McConnell).

You guys are crazy if you don’t want to see this game happen with everything on the line.

Kevin Doyle: Arizona vs. Florida

If Arizona has holes, they’ve masked them well to date. The Wildcats are one of the most sound defensive teams in the country, have a rock solid point guard in T.J. McConnell, a center in Kaleb Tarczewski who is leaps and bounds better than a season ago, and a dynamite wing in Nick Johnson. All of that, and I haven’t even mentioned Aaron Gordon. The X-factor on this team is Gabe York. He has one role: to shoot and hit threes. He has been sub-par in that regard thus far, but if Sean Miller can rely on him for a couple of threes per game, Arizona’s offense becomes that much better.

As for Florida, they may seem like a peculiar pick, but I don’t think we have seen this Gators team even close to their best this season. Remember, they were playing without Scottie Wilbekin and Dorian Finney-Smith to begin the season, and Kasey Hill has missed time due to injury. As good and talented as Kenny Boynton was during his career, Wilbekin is an upgrade, in my opinion. Plus, Casey Prather is better than anyone could have possibly projected this year. Florida hasn’t come close to peaking yet. If we have learned anything about Billy Donovan, it’s to not doubt him in March. Florida has been to the Elite Eight the past three seasons, and this season they make it to the championship.

Top 16 Players of the Sweet 16

Getty Images
Leave a comment

After the mayhem of the opening weekend, the NCAA tournament is down to a sweet 16. We’ve already ranked the remaining teams, and in this space we’re going to rank some of the top players based upon who we’d want on our team.

1. Marvin Bagley III, Duke

Bagley’s in the running for being the top overall pick in this summer’s NBA Draft (should he decide to enter, of course), but there’s still business to attend to in the NCAA tournament. Averaging 21.2 points and 11.3 rebounds per game on the season, Bagley shot 75.0 percent from the field and accounted for 22.0 points and 8.0 rebounds in wins over Iona and Rhode Island. With his size and athleticism Bagley’s a tough matchup for opposing defenses, and Syracuse will certainly account for his presence when the two teams meet Friday night.

2. Jalen Brunson, Villanova

Brunson’s opening weekend was a bit of a mixed bag, as foul trouble placed the national player of the year candidate on the bench for a significant portion of the first half in Villanova’s win over Alabama. Donte DiVincenzo and Mikal Bridges picked up the slack in that one, but there’s no denying the importance of Brunson. From his skill set, which affords Villanova the ability to play though its point guard in the post, to his intangibles there aren’t many players more valuable than Brunson.

3. Devonte’ Graham, Kansas

The Big 12 Player of the Year didn’t shoot the ball particularly well this past weekend, shooting 32.3 percent from the field and 7-for-19 from three. But Graham still managed to average 7.5 assists and 2.0 steals per game in wins over Penn and Seton Hall. Kansas will need Graham to shoot the ball better this week in Omaha, and he’s more than capable of rebounding in that regard while continuing to put his teammates in spots where they can be most successful.

4. Wendell Carter Jr., Duke

The 6-foot-10 freshman offers up a quality counter to Bagley in the Duke front court, as his presence in the post affords Bagley the freedom to play both inside and out. Last weekend Cater averaged 11.0 points, 7.0 rebounds and 2.5 assists per game, making ten of his 15 shots from the field. If there’s one thing Carter will need to change this week it would be getting to the foul line, as he attempted two total in the wins over Iona and Rhode Island.

5. Keenan Evans, Texas Tech

Remember when former North Carolina guard Marcus Paige received the nickname “Second Half Marcus” for his work in the game’s final 20 minutes? For as good as Evans has been throughout the season, his play in the second half of wins over Stephen F. Austin and Florida is a big reason why the Red Raiders are in the Sweet 16. After going off for 19 second-half points in Texas Tech’s win over SFA, Evans followed that up with 14 second-half points against Florida.

6. Mikal Bridges, Villanova

Throughout the course of the season Bridges has shown that he has the potential to be more than the “three and D” guy he’s been projected as at the next level. After putting up a respectable 13 points and six rebounds in the win over Radford, Bridges was even better against Alabama. The 6-foot-7 wing tallied 23 points on Saturday, with the majority of those coming during an early second half run that essentially served as the game’s “knockout blow.”

7. Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, Kentucky

After beginning the season as a reserve, Gilgeous-Alexander has developed into being Kentucky’s most indispensable player. The 6-foot-6 freshman was outstanding in wins over Davidson and Buffalo, averaging 23.0 points, 7.0 rebounds, 6.5 assists and 3.5 steals per game. Gilgeous-Alexander shot 60.0 percent from the field in those games, making the sound decisions with the basketball that Kentucky needs if they’re to continue to advance.

8. Carsen Edwards, Purdue

Admittedly Edwards did not have his best weekend in Detroit, shooting a combined 8-for-29 from the field and 4-for-15 in wins over Cal-State Fullerton and Butler. But if Purdue is to reach the Final Four for the first time since 1980 Edwards will be key, especially with Isaac Haas dealing with a fractured right elbow. It can be argued that Edwards is Purdue’s most dynamic offensive talent, which will be key in the Boilermakers’ matchup with Texas Tech.

9. Jevon Carter, West Virginia

By now Carter’s defensive reputation is well-known, but don’t sleep on his offensive abilities either. In wins over Murray State and Marshall, the senior point guard shot 14-for-27 from the field and averaged 24.5 points, 6.5 assists, 5.0 steals and 4.5 rebounds per game.

10. Gabe DeVoe, Clemson

DeVoe is one of the big reasons why Brad Brownell’s team has managed to not only withstand the season-ending injury suffered by Donte Grantham but reach the Sweet 16. DeVoe scored 22 points in both of the Tigers’ wins in San Diego (shooting 18-for-28 from the field), and in the blowout of 4-seed Auburn he also had five rebounds and five assists.

11. Tyler Davis, Texas A&M

Robert Williams may be the Aggies’ most-discussed player from an NBA Draft standpoint, but Davis is the team’s best front court offensive weapon. The 6-foot-10 junior followed up his 14-point, 15-rebound performance against Providence with 18 points, nine rebounds and three blocks in the win over North Carolina.

12. Caleb Martin, Nevada

Both Martin twins made big plays to ensure the Wolf Pack passage into the Sweet 16, but it’s Caleb who was named the Mountain West’s top newcomer and player of the year. Caleb Martin’s averaging 18.8 points, 5.4 rebounds and 2.6 assists per game on the season, shooting 45.3 percent from the field and 40.1 percent from three.

13. Kevin Knox, Kentucky

The 6-foot-9 freshman certainly has his moments when instead of using his tools to make things happen offensively he settles, firing up tough shots. But there’s no denying the fact that Knox can put up points, as he did in scoring 25 points in Kentucky’s win over Davidson. With Kansas State’s perimeter attack able to get after opponents defensively, Kentucky will need a big game from Knox Thursday night.

14. Sagaba Konate, West Virginia

Why’s West Virginia able to get after opponents defensively in the open floor? A big reason for that is the presence of Konate, who’s done an exceptional job of protecting the rim. At 6-foot-8 Konate may not have the height that some would expect from an elite shot blocker, but he’s got the strength, timing and instincts to cover for his teammates when they’re beaten on the perimeter.

15. Zach Norvell Jr., Gonzaga

While some inexperienced players can shrink from the spotlight in high-pressure situations, others rise to the occasion. That’s exactly what Norvell did in wins over UNCG and Ohio State, with his three giving the Bulldogs the lead for good against the Spartans in the first round. Two days later Norvell found his groove shooting-wise, making six three pointers and scoring 28 points to go along with 12 rebounds and four assists.

16. Barry Brown, Kansas State

With first team All-Big 12 forward Dean Wade out due to a foot injury, Brown stepped up as Kansas State picked up wins over Creighton and UMBC. Brown scored 18 points in both of those games, and while the field goal percentage (37.0 percent) wasn’t great he did manage to go 15-for-18 from the foul line.

One player from each team not mentioned above: Terence Mann, Florida State; Clayton Custer, Loyola-Chicago; Muhammad-Ali Abdur-Rahkman, Michigan; Tyus Battle, Syracuse.

Texas freshman Mo Bamba declares for NBA draft

Getty Images
1 Comment

Texas freshman Mo Bamba announced on Tuesday that he will be declaring for the NBA Draft, which comes as no major surprise to anyone that has been paying attention.

“After an incredibly rewarding year at The University of Texas, I will not be returning to school as I will be entering the NBA Draft,” Bamba said in a statement released by the program.

Bamba is a projected top ten pick in this year’s NBA Draft that has a chance to go in the top five. He was always going to be a one-and-done player. A 6-foot-11 center with a 7-foot-9 wingspan, he averaged 12.9 points, 10.5 rebounds and 3.7 blocks per game during his one season with the Longhorns.

New Ole Miss coach Kermit Davis: My team will ‘respect the flag and the National Anthem’

Jamie Squire/Getty Images

New Ole Miss head coach Kermit Davis didn’t exactly get his tenure off on the right foot on Monday evening.

At his introductory press conference, Davis had this to say about the way that he’s going to run his program: “What is Ole Miss Basketball going to look like? It’s going to be relentless, athletic, explosive, a team that’s going to have to play on and on and on to beat. It’s going to be a team that’s going to be unselfish. We’re going to play fast and smart in transition. We’re going to try to get easy baskets. We’re going to try to play with great body language. We’re going to be a respectful team that respects the flag and the National Anthem. All those things from culture is what we’re about. It’s who we’re going to be.”

At Ole Miss, Davis is going to be recruiting young men that, for the most part, are African-American, which is precisely the demographic that has dealt with the institutionalized racism and police brutality that sparked the Black Lives Matter movement and spawned Colin Kaepernick’s initial protest.

When you’re already at a recruiting disadvantage because you’re Ole Miss, giving every other coach in the conference ammo to use against you on the recruiting trail — Do I need to spell that one out for you? — is probably not the best idea.

But that’s neither here nor there.

Because we’re talking about how he’s building a program that respects the flag and the National Anthem, right?

The mascot for the school that he’s now coaching is, quite literally, named after confederate soldiers. If he’s such a proud American that he cannot tolerate black men protesting against institutionalized racism within our borders, how can he coach a team named after the soldiers that tried to tear this country apart 150 years ago just because they wanted to be able to own those black men?

If that’s not hypocrisy at its finest, I don’t know what is.

Purdue looking to get engineering students to help with Isaac Haas’ elbow brace

Elsa/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Purdue University is an engineering school, and if you know anything about engineers, it’s that they like to build and invent stuff.

And so the basketball program is tapping into that. According to the Journal & Courier, those engineers are trying to find a way to make a brace for 7-foot-3 center Isaac Haas that would allow him to play this weekend. Haas, who broke his elbow in a first round win over Cal St.-Fullerton, tried to play with a brace on Sunday against Butler but it was not approved by the NCAA.

The problem, however, is that regardless of the brace that Purdue puts on Haas, he is still going to be asked to play with a broken elbow on his shooting hand. How will he make free throws? How will he score in the post if he can’t shoot right-handed jump-hooks? How can he, you know, play basketball with one arm?

“He has the best brace you can possibly have on that they didn’t approve,” Painter told reporters on Purdue’s campus Monday afternoon. “So if he has the best brace possible and he can’t shoot a right-handed free throw, this brace isn’t going to be better. It’s just going to be one that’s a little bit less [bulky] and it’s going to get approved. He still has a broken elbow.”

“Maybe with some decrease in inflammation. Maybe with some opportunities to rest it without any kind of additional treatment, maybe some natural healing will do it well,” Haas added on Sunday. “One thing is for sure: I’m going to ride with these guys as long as they last. I know they’ll make it all the way.”

If I’m Purdue, I chase the hell out of this. I do everything I can to find a way to get Haas cleared to at least get on the floor, because — as cliche as this is going to sound — the emotional boost that those other three seniors are going to get from seeing the fourth member of their class on the court with a broken elbow in the last games they’ll ever play together will be a benefit.

There is no way that Haas will be a better option than Matt Haarms with this injury.

But getting him on the court, even if just for a few possessions here and there, is something that would be a major boost to the Purdue team.

Get it done, engineers.

Winter Storm Toby ruining West Virginia’s travel plans

Getty Images
1 Comment

West Virginia already had to deal with one of the tougher travel schedules of anyone in the NCAA tournament.

A team in the eastern timezone, the Mountaineers had to travel all the way out to San Diego for their first weekend games. They played the last game on Sunday night before flying back to Morgantown on Monday morning.

Now they’re on the move again. West Virginia announced Monday that the team will leave a day early for Boston, where No. 5-seed West Virginia takes on top-seeded Villanova in the East Region semifinals at TD Garden on Friday night.

The National Weather Service says the bulk of the wind-driven snow and sleet is expected to hit New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware and parts of eastern Pennsylvania before heading off to Massachusetts early Thursday.

Good thing these student-athletes don’t have to worry about missing class or anything.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.