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College Basketball Talk’s Player of the Year Power Rankings

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source: Getty Images

The 2013-2014 season is sure to be a thrilling Player of the Year race, so to keep track of it, we will be posting weekly Player of the Year Power Rankings for your reading goodness.

Who’d we miss? Who’s ranked too high? We love to overlook your team’s best player and overrate your rival’s superstar.

1. Jabari Parker, Duke: On Saturday, Parker scored seven points on 2-for-10 shooting and got himself benched for the final 3:35 in a loss to Notre Dame in South Bend that dropped the Blue Devils from the top 10 to No. 16 in the AP poll. So what? If we were doing a college hoops draft, Parker is still the first pick. There’s only one guy in the country that would be in the conversation with him …

2. Doug McDermott, Creighton: … and that’s Dougie McBuckets. I hope everyone that gets a chance to watching Doug play this season truly appreciates what they’re watching. He’s unquestionably one of the best college basketball players that we’ve seen at any time in recent memory. You wanna know how good he is? The kid put of 30 points, 10 boards and five assists in a road win at Seton Hall and you heard nothing about it on Saturday. Not a peep. That’s because a night like that is not uncommon for McDermott, who is on the verge of becoming the first three-time first-team all-american since Patrick Ewing and Wayman Tisdale.

Here is a stat, sent out by Creighton’s SID, for you to chew on before I move on: McDermott is averaging 24.7 points and 7.5 boards and shooting 42.7% from three. Since 1998, the only other college player to post those numbers? Kevin Durant. Enjoy it while it lasts.

3. Deandre Kane, Iowa State: I’m not sure there is a more under-appreciated player in the country that Deandre Kane, who transferred to Iowa State after getting dismissed from the team at Marshall. He’s been the biggest reason the Cyclones are still undefeated.

Here’s a breakdown of Kane’s numbers compared to the other four point guards on this list:

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4. Julius Randle, Kentucky: Randle’s numbers — 18.1 points and 10.6 boards — could look even more impressive if he didn’t bow out of the game against Louisville with cramps. You saw what he did, right? 17 points on 7-for-8 shooting in the first half.

source: Getty Images5. Tyler Ennis, Syracuse: A lot of people would pick C.J. Fair as the best player on Syracuse, but I think Ennis is easily the most valuable player and the biggest reason the Orange entered ACC play undefeated. He’s the only point guard on the roster, he’s a freshman, he doesn’t turn the ball over and he’s got a tremendous sense of timing. He seems to remain deferential until the exact moment the Orange need him to take over.

6. Marcus Smart, Oklahoma State: If you include the loss to Memphis, Marcus Smart has been rather human in the last seven games. His numbers: 12.3 points, 4.4 assists, 4.3 boards, 2.9 t/o’s and shooting numbers of 43.9/22.6/72.4.

7. Shabazz Napier, UConn: UConn had an awful, o-2 swing through Texas last week and outside of a 25-point second half against Houston, Napier was 2-for-14 from the floor with just 14 points. Not good enough.

8. Casey Prather, Florida: Prather’s last two games have been rather quiet, averaging just 11.0 points in wins over Richmond and Savannah State, but that doesn’t change the fact that he’s been the best player on Florida this season.

9. Nick Johnson, Arizona: The best perimeter defender, the best perimeter shoot and the leading scorer on the best team in the country deserves a spot on this list.

10. Keith Appling, Michigan State: It’s hard to pick just one guy off of the Michigan State team, but for my money, Appling’s play down the stretch in close games early in the season and the fact that he’s been the facilitator for this loaded offense sets him apart.

Others: Jordan Adams, Kyle Anderson, Ron Baker, Cameron Bairstow, Jahii Carson, Jordan Clarkson, Aaron Craft, Joel Embiid, C.J. Fair, Aaron Gordon, Rodney Hood, Marcus Paige, Lamar Patterson, Adreian Payne, Elfrid Payton, Russ Smith, T.J. Warren, Andrew Wiggins, Chaz Williams, Joseph Young

Report: Former Buckeye Mitchell headed to Arizona State

INDIANAPOLIS, IN - MARCH 11: Head coach Thad Matta of the Ohio State Buckeyes talks to Mickey Mitchell #00 against the Michigan State Spartans in the quarterfinal round of the Big Ten Basketball Tournament at Bankers Life Fieldhouse on March 11, 2016 in Indianapolis, Indiana. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)
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Yet another one of the members of the heralded 2015 Ohio State recruiting class won’t be playing at his second choice of school either.

Mickey Mitchell will transfer to Arizona State after initially planning on going to UC-Santa Barbara upon his exit from the Buckeyes, according to Scout.

Thad Matta lost four players from that top-10 five-man recruiting class with Austin Grandstaff, Daniel Giddens and A.J. Harris all also deciding to leave Columbus.

Grandstaff also did not play at his first choice after Ohio State, deciding to ultimately depart Oklahoma for DePaul after heading to Norman from OSU.

Mitchell, once a four-star recruit, appeared in 23 games for the Buckeyes as a freshman, averaging 2 points and 2.8 rebounds per game. He is expected to enroll at Arizona State in time for the next semester and will be eligible at the semester break next year for the Sun Devils.

Utah’s Krystkowiak reveals he had cancerous thyroid removed

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Utah coach Larry Krystkowiak had surgery this spring to remove his thyroid after cancer was discovered in it, he revealed Monday during his coach’s radio show, according to the Deseret News.

“I had my thyroid taken out this spring,” Krystkowiak said. “Found some cancer in it.”

Krystkowiak made light of the situation, mentioning it contributed to some weight game.

“It’s OK if I skip a meal from time to time,” he said. “I gotta watch the midsection. That’s one of the byproducts of not having a thyroid. I guess you get a little chunky.”

Krystkowiak, who has been at Utah since 2011, and the Utes are currently 6-1 with their lone loss coming to Butler. They travel to face Xavier on Saturday.

Bobby Hurley ridicules his Arizona State team’s effort in loss

LAS VEGAS, NV - DECEMBER 16:  Head coach Bobby Hurley of the Arizona State Sun Devils yells to his players during their game against the UNLV Rebels at the Thomas & Mack Center on December 16, 2015 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Arizona State won 66-56.  (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
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NEW YORK — A totally forgettable Arizona State performance in the Jimmy V Classic on Tuesday night led to some truly unforgettable comments from head coach Bobby Hurley.

Hurley, who has a reputation for having something of a temper, teed off on his team in the press conference after the game, criticizing them as harshly as you’ll ever see a coach do in public. He called them “embarrassing” and the performance “disturbing”.

“I thought we competed for about eight minutes out of 40,” Hurley said. The Sun Devils were down 47-21 at the half, by as many as 42 points in the second half and eventually lost 97-64 to a Purdue team that scored 19 first half points against Louisville exactly a week ago. “It’s unfortunate that our team didn’t even come close to the energy that Jimmy V had in his life and his passion. We had no passion for playing. We did a disservice to this game and this event and what he represented.”

It’s not often that you see a coach publicly ridicule players like that. Humiliation isn’t always the best motivating tactic. Oftentimes, it’s the easiest way to lose a locker room.

Hurley wasn’t done.

“For a city that’s a blue-collar city and an arena that has so much tradition and so many good players that have played on this court — to look like that, it was embarrassing,” he said. “And then the cause, such a great cause that we’re playing for tonight. Did my players play as hard as the people that are going through what they go through in cancer, as families go through in their personal situations? I don’t think so.”

Oh, there’s more.

“That was really disturbing, how we competed,” Hurley said. “It’s not a reflection of my personality or the teams I’ve coached in the past, so we have to make some changes.”

For better or worse, this is the second time in Hurley’s tenure with Arizona State that he’s made national headlines. Last season, he went viral during a theatrical ejection in an Arizona State loss against in-state rival Arizona.

Hurley is trying to make Arizona State relevant, which is why he’s scheduling games against anyone and everyone in an effort to get his brand on national television.

And he’s succeeded in a sense.

After this rant, you’ll see his name on every sports website this morning.

I’m not so sure that’s the best way to build recruiting momentum.

CBT Podcast: Recapping Kentucky-UCLA, Player of the Year ranks, Cuse-UConn

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In the latest episode of the NBCSports.com College Basketball Talk podcast, I was joined by my former colleague Raphielle Johnson to discuss everything from Kentucky-UCLA to Syracuse-UConn to who deserves to be the Player of the Year after the first month of the season.

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You can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes, Stitcher and Audioboom

Return on Investment: Dixon era already paying dividends for TCU

Pittsburgh v Wichita State
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KANSAS CITY, Mo. — Jaylen Fisher was in demand.

Not only is the Tennessee native talented, rated by most services as a four-star recruit, he suddenly became available when players of his caliber are in short supply, having decommitted from UNLV last spring.

The likes of Baylor, Ohio State, Florida and UConn were all interested. So, too, was TCU.

While rarely a player for prospects of Fisher’s pedigree, the Horned Frogs had a strong recruiting pitch, starting with a new coach, Jamie Dixon, taking over for his alma mater after 11 NCAA tournaments in 13 years at Pitt, plus the assistant who got him to commit to UNLV, Ryan Miller, joining the staff.

TCU, though, had a perception problem.

“Last year they didn’t charter (to away games),” Dixon told NBCSports.com in October, “and everybody else chartered.

“Everybody was using it against us in the conference, saying TCU doesn’t charter to games. I didn’t know that because they had told me we were going to charter to every game. So we had to address that and get that out there.”

Such is life at a place that has long prioritized football and baseball, with winter being the time before spring football, not basketball season.

That, though, may be changing.

TCU is investing in basketball, from chartered flights, to a new arena to Dixon himself. The race is on to climb out of the Big 12 cellar, get to the program’s first NCAA tournament in nearly two decades and then win its first game there in three.

“We’re trying,” senior Karviar Shepherd said, “to make basketball a big thing.”

LAWRENCE, KS - FEBRUARY 21: Head coach Trent Johnson of the TCU Horned Frogs reacts during the second half of the game against the Kansas Jayhawks at Allen Fieldhouse on February 21, 2015 in Lawrence, Kansas. (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images

Since bolting the Mountain West for Big 12 to pursue football glory, basketball has been a disaster for TCU.

The Frogs have won eight conference games in four years, going 0-for-2014 with 18 league losses that season. The highwater mark came in 2015, when they went 4-14 and finished a game ahead of last. They’ve finished last in attendance every year, averaging fewer than 5,000 fans per game.

“I came in knowing that it was going to be that way, kind of,” Shepherd, a four-star recruit in 2013, said. “I didn’t know it was going to be that intense, but it happened.”

Losses were only part of the ignominy for the Horned Frogs.

The school’s largest public pronouncement of caring about basketball also caused the program to appear its most unimportant.

They spent 2014-15 playing in a high school gym.

Certainly, it was an ends justify the means situation as TCU was displaced by a $72 million renovation to the outdated Daniel-Meyer Coliseum (now Schollmaier Arena).

But a season’s worth of games at the Wilkerson-Greines Athletic Center, home of the Fort Worth Independent School District, was no picnic.

“Playing at the high school was more like an away game,” Shepherd said. “We didn’t have that much of a crowd come in.

“It was kind of compact, orange all over. We had to get through it.”

TCU's Jalen Fisher, left scrambles for a loose basketball against Washington's Markelle Fultz during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Wednesday, No. 30, 2016, in Fort Worth, Texas. (Bob Haynes/Star-Telegram via AP)
Bob Haynes/Star-Telegram via AP

The Horned Frogs now hope the growing pains have been worth it.

They spent last year in the Schollmaier Arena, a modern facility that helps keep pace with the rest of the league. The losses eventually proved too much for the school to stay with Trent Johnson, but their decision to act aggressively with his dismissal allowed them to pursue Dixon, who not only won at the highest levels at Pitt but graduated from TCU in 1987 after winning back-to-back Southwest Conference titles.

“Losing a coach that’s been with you for three years, any coach, that’s hard to do,” Shepherd said. “(Dixon) came in with a positive attitude, which helped us and guided us in to what he wanted to do.”

Dixon status as not only an alum, but one with connections to one of the few successful eras of TCU basketball is something that makes him uniquely qualified to turn the Frogs from cellar-dwellers to contenders.

“I think it gives more passion,” Shepherd said. “It’s TCU for TCU. He has that type of thing going on. He wants to do the best for his community, which is TCU.”

Dixon’s degree makes for a nice recruiting pitch, too.

“I think it brings something different,” he said. “Not many coaches out there are coaching at the place they went to school. I made the choice to come there. I had choices to be at other great places, other great programs, move to other great places and I think I‘m recognizing it more.

“I don’t think I saw it initially but now that I’ve been at it and I’ve seen and I’ve looked around, you can sell, you can talk about a different experience than the other coaches can. We talk about once you go to TCU, it’s not a four-year decision, it’s a decision for life.

“There’s no better example than myself.”

FILE - In this March 22,, 2016, file photo, TCU's new men's basketball coach Jamie Dixon acknowledges the crowds response as he was introduced during an NCAA college basketball news conference, in Fort Worth, Texas. Dixon’s Horned Frogs have started 4-0 in his first season but have gone 8-64 in Big 12 play over the past four years. (Ron T. Ennis/Star-Telegram via AP, File)
Ron T. Ennis/Star-Telegram via AP, File

TCU’s investment in basketball appears to be initially paying off. The Frogs are 8-0 heading into tonight’s matchup with their crosstown counterpart, SMU, tonight. The schedule they’ve conquered to remain unbeaten is no Goliath, but when you’ve spent as much time as TCU has with that zero on the front end of your record, strength of schedule is of little consequence, at least at this point.

“It doesn’t happen overnight,” Dixon said at Big 12 media day before the season. “The administration is expressing that and there’s some things that I have to bring to their attention, too as well.

“And then there’s things that are happening over time. Next year there’s going to be something that’s hot that everybody’s going to do and you’ve got to stay up with that. That’s what I learned at Pitt. You’ve got to stay up with the times and advantages because it’s a war out there.”

The real war is always on the recruiting trail, where it looks as though TCU is making up ground in the talent-rich Lone Star State. Kevin Samuel, a four-star center from Houston, and R.J. Nembhard, a four-star guard from right outside Dallas, are both signed for the 2017 class.

The Horned Frogs may be seeing early returns, but their true return on investment won’t be known for some time. TCU, even with a fast start, wouldn’t appear to be on an NCAA tournament track this season. Building a program, especially one with little previous historical tradition and playing in one of the country’s toughest league, takes time.

“You don’t want to say, that’s how we did it at Pitt. You don’t want to say that every sentence,” Dixon said, “but we’ve had experience building something from nothing. That’s the reality of it at Pitt. We need to do that.”

Part of that begins with changing perception. An 8-0 start – and potentially a win against SMU – would helps in that department. Dixon, though, has already begun to change the way TCU is thought of.

Before they got Samuel and Nembhard, the Horned Frogs got Fisher, getting out in front of any aircraft-related negative recruiting.

“When you’re picked 10th and you finish at the bottom,” Dixon said, “we’re easier to take shots at. They can find them and people are more apt to believe it too.”

So are the darkest days now behind TCU?

“The losses that we had,” Shepherd said, “it built character within each player, just knowing where we came from, where we want to be and where we’re going.

“It builds character.”

With the character secure, it’s now on Dixon and TCU to build a program.