Steve Masiello

Vin Parise’s 30-second timeout: Five questions with Steve Masiello

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Vin Parise from CBT caught up with Manhattan head coach Steve Masiello.  The Jaspers are 8-2 and one of the hottest mid-majors in the country right now.

CBT: Steve, let’s start out with the most recent win in your 5 game winning streak – your road victory at South Carolina.

Masiello: It was proud night for our program as a whole; players, coaches, fans, alumni – everybody.  That is what Manhattan was known for in the 90’s under Steve Lappas, Fran Fraschilla and Bobby Gonzalez – winning games against BCS level schools.  For our team to win on the road in the SEC was a great night for the MAAC.

CBT: As of the interview today, your team has more road wins than anyone in the country.  How have you been able to win these games, while still continuing to play nearly 10 guys every night?

Masiello: To be honest, it’s all about the kids buying in.  Our roles are completely defined and the kids are on board with it.  Our 8th, 9th and 10th guys don’t try to be our 2nd, 3rd and 4th guys – and we’re taking pride in that.  Our 9th guy wants to be the best 9th guy in the country.

CBT: Can you explain your ball club to the college hoops junkie who hasn’t seen Manhattan play yet this season?

Masiello: Obviously those that have seen us play know we like to attack both ends of the court and press; but we’ve really simplified our philosophy over the course of this winning streak.  As a coaching staff we literally emphasize two things right now.  Our goal is to play harder than the opponent – not just play hard, play harder.  And the other emphasis to to talk more than the other team every possession.  So many things have fallen into place from us concentrating on those two things.

CBT: George Beamon is your senior leader after a season ending injury last year.  How do you feel about how he’s bounced back?

Masiello: First off, he’s a joy to coach.  And he’s all about the win.  Not the stats – just the win.  When your leading scorer preaches that everyday, it’s a lot easier as a coach.  And it’s more than just scoring when it comes to George.  He’s one of the best rebounders for his position in the nation and he still had a double-double in a poor performance at Marist.  A big reason we took the Bahamas trip in the summer was to get the rust off of his game from sitting out so long – but I couldn’t be happier with his start right now.

CBT: What are your thoughts on the MAAC this year?

Masiello:  Our league always represents well in non-conference early and this year has been no different.  No matter where our league is ranked year in and year out; we always have 4-5 teams that can win the conference tournament – I truly believe that.  I was an assistant here in 2004 and we needed double OT to beat Niagara in the MAAC tourney. We then went on to beat Florida in the 1st round of the Dance.  In a one bid league, it’s sometimes harder to get out of your own conference tournament than it is to play great in the NCAA’s.

*Vin Parise is the College Basketball Insider for NBC Sports Network and SportsNet NY.  He is also a contributor & analyst for ESPN3, MSG Network, Cox Sports-New England, Fox Sports 1, The Providence Coaches Show, St. John’s Radio & Iona College Radio.  He coached 8 seasons at FDU, Rutgers & Iona.  

Follow Vin on Twitter:  @VinParise

No. 4 Maryland refocuses, slows down No. 18 Purdue

Maryland head coach Mark Turgeon watches from the sideline during a break in play in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game against Purdue, Saturday, Feb. 6, 2016, in College Park, Md. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
AP Photo/Patrick Semansky
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No. 18 Purdue and No. 4 Maryland exchanged leads for most of the first 33 minutes before the Boilermakers scored five straight points on layups by Rapheal Davis (who was fouled on his make) and Caleb Swanigan. Purdue was getting the touches it wanted around the basket, and Mark Turgeon’s Terrapins weren’t doing a whole lot to keep it from happening either.

Turgeon called a timeout to get his team back in sync defensively, and as a result Maryland went on a 9-0 run that ultimately led to their winning by the final score of 72-61.

Maryland’s big men, Robert Carter Jr. and Diamond Stone, did a much better job down the stretch of keeping Purdue from getting the ball inside to senior center A.J. Hammons. Hammons finished the game with 18 points and ten rebounds, but only two of those points came after Maryland’s 9-0 second half run. But keeping the ball from getting inside is just as much about the players defending the passers as it is keeping the big(s) from getting to his preferred spot.

Defensively Maryland took away the passing angles and essentially made Purdue’s guards make plays, something they’ve struggled with at times this season. That led to far too many perimeter shots for Purdue, which shot 3-for-23 on the day from beyond the arc. Add in the fact that they attempted just five free throws as a team, making two, and areas in which the Boilermakers can benefit went neglected in College Park.

By comparison Maryland was able to make a habit of going to the foul line, shooting 24-for-27 from the charity stripe with Rasheed Sulaimon and Melo Trimble combining to go 17-for-19 on the day. The foul line helped Trimble make up for an off day from the field, as he shot 2-for-12, but the sophomore’s ability to work off of ball screens ultimately opened things up for Maryland even with his shots not falling.

Add in the fact that Sulaimon (21 points, ten rebounds) and Carter (19 points, seven rebounds) were able to pick up the slack, with Diamond Stone adding 12 points and six rebounds, and it’s easy to see why Maryland was able to turn things around down the stretch.

Maryland’s been a good defensive team this season, but they got away from that for a significant portion of Saturday’s game. A key timeout to get the team refocused paid off, the the Terrapins defending at a level that made it incredibly difficult for Purdue to get anything going. And as a result, Maryland remains within a game of leaders Iowa and Indiana in the Big Ten title race.

Darryl Reynolds shines, Kris Dunn struggles as No. 3 Villanova beat No. 11 Providence

Villanova forward Darryl Reynolds (45) dunks the ball in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game against Creighton, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016, in Villanova, Pa. Villanova won 83-58. (AP Photo/Laurence Kesterson)
(AP Photo/Laurence Kesterson)
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Replacing the injured Daniel Ochefu, who missed his third straight game as the result of a concussion, Darryl Reynolds finished with a career-high 19 points and 10 boards as No. 3 Villanova went into Providence and knocked off the No. 11 Friars, 72-60.

Josh Hart chipped in with 14 points and 13 boards (seven of which were offensive), Kris Jenkins notched a double-double as well and Ryan Arcidiacono added 16 points for the Wildcats, who improved to 10-1 in Big East play, keeping them all alone in first place in the league.

Perhaps the most impressive part of this win, which wasn’t quite as close as the final score would indicate, is that Villanova did it while shooting just 5-for-22 from three. The Wildcats have been reliant on the three during this recent run atop the conference, and on Saturday, they won by controlling the the glass and the paint.

Reynolds’ performance was something else. This is a guy who entered the game averaging just 2.3 points and a reputation for being little more than the reason that Ochefu played so many minutes, but it got to the point on Saturday that he was being double-teamed in the post to get the ball out of his hands. That’s pretty remarkable.

As if the fact that Villanova, playing without their best rebounder, grabbed 12 offensive rebounds and totally controlled the defensive glass.

 

Much of that is likely due to the fact that Ben Bentil, the 6-foot-8 forward for the Friars that is the Big East’s leading scorer, was dealing with an ankle injury he suffered at DePaul earlier this week. He finished 20 points, but much of that came in the form of jumpers and shots at the rim while his two rebounds was much more indicative of the impact that he was able to make with his ankle.

But what was really concerning for Providence was that Kris Dunn was downright awful. He shot 4-for-15 from the floor, committed six turnovers and simply made the wrong decision too many times. Yes, he was likely pressing due to the fact that Bentil was injured and Villanova’s defense was keying on him, but it’s not exactly comforting to know that this is what his floor is.

He’s Kris Dunn.

He’s going to be keyed on by defenses every single time he steps on a basketball court.

He has to be better than he was today.