Vin Parise’s 30-second timeout: Five questions with Steve Masiello

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Vin Parise from CBT caught up with Manhattan head coach Steve Masiello.  The Jaspers are 8-2 and one of the hottest mid-majors in the country right now.

CBT: Steve, let’s start out with the most recent win in your 5 game winning streak – your road victory at South Carolina.

Masiello: It was proud night for our program as a whole; players, coaches, fans, alumni – everybody.  That is what Manhattan was known for in the 90’s under Steve Lappas, Fran Fraschilla and Bobby Gonzalez – winning games against BCS level schools.  For our team to win on the road in the SEC was a great night for the MAAC.

CBT: As of the interview today, your team has more road wins than anyone in the country.  How have you been able to win these games, while still continuing to play nearly 10 guys every night?

Masiello: To be honest, it’s all about the kids buying in.  Our roles are completely defined and the kids are on board with it.  Our 8th, 9th and 10th guys don’t try to be our 2nd, 3rd and 4th guys – and we’re taking pride in that.  Our 9th guy wants to be the best 9th guy in the country.

CBT: Can you explain your ball club to the college hoops junkie who hasn’t seen Manhattan play yet this season?

Masiello: Obviously those that have seen us play know we like to attack both ends of the court and press; but we’ve really simplified our philosophy over the course of this winning streak.  As a coaching staff we literally emphasize two things right now.  Our goal is to play harder than the opponent – not just play hard, play harder.  And the other emphasis to to talk more than the other team every possession.  So many things have fallen into place from us concentrating on those two things.

CBT: George Beamon is your senior leader after a season ending injury last year.  How do you feel about how he’s bounced back?

Masiello: First off, he’s a joy to coach.  And he’s all about the win.  Not the stats – just the win.  When your leading scorer preaches that everyday, it’s a lot easier as a coach.  And it’s more than just scoring when it comes to George.  He’s one of the best rebounders for his position in the nation and he still had a double-double in a poor performance at Marist.  A big reason we took the Bahamas trip in the summer was to get the rust off of his game from sitting out so long – but I couldn’t be happier with his start right now.

CBT: What are your thoughts on the MAAC this year?

Masiello:  Our league always represents well in non-conference early and this year has been no different.  No matter where our league is ranked year in and year out; we always have 4-5 teams that can win the conference tournament – I truly believe that.  I was an assistant here in 2004 and we needed double OT to beat Niagara in the MAAC tourney. We then went on to beat Florida in the 1st round of the Dance.  In a one bid league, it’s sometimes harder to get out of your own conference tournament than it is to play great in the NCAA’s.

*Vin Parise is the College Basketball Insider for NBC Sports Network and SportsNet NY.  He is also a contributor & analyst for ESPN3, MSG Network, Cox Sports-New England, Fox Sports 1, The Providence Coaches Show, St. John’s Radio & Iona College Radio.  He coached 8 seasons at FDU, Rutgers & Iona.  

Follow Vin on Twitter:  @VinParise

VIDEO: Jay-Z’s nephew posterizes nation’s No. 1 recruit Marvin Bagley III

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Nahziah Carter is an unsigned 6-foot-6 wing in the Class of 2017.

He’s also Jay-Z’s nephew, and he just so happened to posterize Marvin Bagley III — the clearcut No. 1 prospect in the Class of 2018 — while Hova was in the stands watching him.

NCAA denies extra-year request by NC State guard Henderson

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RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The NCAA has denied North Carolina State guard Terry Henderson’s request for another year of eligibility.

Henderson announced the decision Friday in a statement issued by the school.

The Raleigh native played two seasons at West Virginia before transferring to N.C. State and redshirting in 2014-15. He played for only 7 minutes of the following season before suffering a season-ending ankle injury.

As a redshirt senior in 2016-17, he was the team’s second-leading scorer at 13.8 points per game and made a team-best 78 3-pointers.

Henderson called it “an honor and privilege” to play in his hometown.

SMU gets transfer in Georgetown’s Akoy Agau

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SMU pulled in a frontcourt player in Georgetown transfer Akoy Agau, a source confirmed to NBCSports.com. Agau is immediately eligible for next season as a graduate transfer.

The 6-foot-8 Agau started his career at Louisville before transferring to Georgetown after one season. Spending two seasons with the Hoyas, Agau was limited to 11 minutes in his first season due to injuries. He averaged 4.5 points and 4.3 rebounds per game last season.

Coming out of high school, Agau was a four-star prospect but he’s never lived up to that billing in-part because of injuries. Now, Agau gets one more chance to make a difference as he’s hoping to help replace some departed pieces like Ben Moore and Semi Ojeleye.

South Carolina loses big man Sedee Keita to transfer

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South Carolina big man Sedee Keita will transfer from the program, he announced on Friday.

The 6-foot-9 Keita was once regarded as a top-100 national prospect in the Class of 2016, but he never found consistent minutes with the Gamecocks for last season’s Final Four team.

Keita appeared in 29 games and averaged 1.1 points and 2.0 rebounds per game while shooting 27 percent from the field.

A native of Philadelphia, Keita will have to sit out next season before getting three more seasons of eligibility.

Although Keita failed to make an impact during his only season at South Carolina, he’ll be a coveted transfer thanks to his size and upside.

Mississippi State losing two to transfer

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Mississippi State will lose two players to transfer as freshmen Mario Kegler and Eli Wright are leaving the program.

Both Kegler and Wright were four-star prospects coming out of high school as they were apart of a six-man recruiting class that is supposed to be a major foundation for Ben Howland’s future with the Bulldogs.

The 6-foot-7 Kegler was Mississippi State’s third-leading scorer last season as he averaged 9.7 points and 5.5 rebounds per game. Kegler should command some quality schools on the transfer market, especially since he’ll still have three more years of eligibility after sitting out next season due to NCAA transfer regulations. Kegler’s loss is also notable for Mississippi State because it is the second consecutive offseason that Howland lost a top-100, in-state product to transfer after only one season after Malik Newman left for Kansas.

Wright, a 6-foot-4 guard, was never able to find consistent minutes as he was already behind underclass perimeter options like Quinndary Weatherspoon, Lamar Peters and Tyson Carter last season. With Nick Weatherspoon, Quinndary’s four-star brother, also joining the Bulldogs next season, the writing was likely on the wall that Wright wasn’t going to earn significant playing time.