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The Chase for 180: Nic Moore’s hot start

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Who is the best shooter in the country?

It’s a tough question to answer, isn’t it? Does being a “shooter” simply mean merely being a high-level marksman from beyond the arc? Can a player who thrives in the mid-range but rarely ventures out into three-point land be eligible? How heavily should we be valuing stats like efficiency and effective field goal percentage when taking all of this into account?

One number that we like to use is “180″. How do you become a 180 shooter? By shooting 50% or better from the field overall, 40% or better from three and at least 90% from the charity stripe. From this point forward we’ll track this until the end of the regular season, providing weekly updates as well as a look into how some of the nation’s best find (and connect on) their quality looks.

In their second season under Larry Brown the SMU Mustangs are off to an 8-2 start, and while they may not be mentioned with the likes of Louisville, Memphis and UConn in the American Athletic Conference there’s no denying the fact that the program has taken positive steps since his arrival. With five returning starters and some talented newcomers, SMU is expected to improve upon its 15-17 mark of a season ago.

One of the biggest reasons for the Mustangs’ 8-2 start is a transfer from Illinois State whose also the lone player under six feet tall. 5-foot-9 point guard Nic Moore was one of the best freshmen in the Missouri Valley Conference in 2011-12, earning MVC All-Freshman Team honors and helping lead the Redbirds to the MVC tournament title game. During that season Moore averaged 10.0 points and 3.9 assists per game but his shooting percentages were low, as he shot 39.6% from the field and 38.9% from beyond the arc.

That year in residency spent by the majority of transfers (yes, despite all the waivers that get handed out that rule does still exist) can be highly beneficial, because while it’s a nuisance to sit out players can also use the time to further refine their skills. For Moore, from a statistical standpoint he’s become a much better jump shooter at SMU. Per hoop-math.com, Moore made just 41% of his two-point jumpers in his lone season at Illinois State. Through ten games at SMU, that percentage is up to 56.5%

Overall Moore’s shooting 55.8% from the field, and he tied for seventh nationally in three-point percentage (60%). Moore’s failed to shoot at least 44% from the field in just one game this season, shooting 4-for-11 in the Mustangs’ season-opening win over TCU. A point guard’s primary responsibility is to run his team, but you have to be able to make shots as well.

Moore’s arrival is one of the reasons why SMU has experienced a sharp improvement in offensive efficiency (up to 68th nationally per Ken Pomeroy after ranking 215th last season), effective field goal percentage (20th compared to 207th) and three-point percentage (17th compared to 130th). And if he can keep on the current track that he’s on, Moore has the ability to finish the season as a “180” player while also leading the Mustangs to greater success than they experienced a season ago.

THE TOP TEN (Note: Players much be eligible to be ranked in FG%, 3PT% and FT%. And here’s a glossary that includes the stats you’ll see used in these posts.)

1) Austin Tillotson (Colgate)
67.1% FG, 64.0% 3PT, 78.6% FT = 209.7
Shot%: 18.3%
eFG%: 78.1%
True shooting%: 78.8%

2) Anthony Brown (Stanford)
58.3%, 60.0%, 77.8% = 196.1
Shot%: 19.6%
eFG%: 70.8%
True shooting%: 72.7%

3) Michael Frazier II (Florida)
50.6%, 52.0%, 93.3% = 195.9
Shot%: 20.1%
eFG%: 66.7%
True shooting%: 69.2%

4) Nic Moore (SMU)
55.8%, 60.0%, 79.2% = 195.0
Shot%: 20.4%
eFG%: 73.3%
True shooting%: 74.4%

5) Rashad Madden (Arkansas)
56.8%, 60.0%, 73.1% = 189.9
Shot%: 18.8%
eFG%: 70.5%
True shooting%: 71.9%

6) Drew Windler (Belmont)
56.6%, 56.0%, 73.5% = 186.1
Shot%: 22.1%
eFG%: 73.5%
True shooting%: 74.1%

7) Kevin Pangos (Gonzaga)
47.4%, 47.4%, 91.1% = 185.9
Shot%: 24.2%
eFG%: 61.1%
True shooting%: 65.9%

8) Steve Glowiak (Sacred Heart)
46.8%, 47.5%, 90.9% = 185.2
Shot%: 22.1%
eFG%: 64.6%
True shooting%: 66.5%

9) Shabazz Napier (UConn)
50.0%, 57.1%, 78.0% = 185.1
Shot%: 22.0%
eFG%: 58.9%
True shooting%: 63.0%

10) Joab Jerome (Winthrop)
53.6%, 59.1%, 71.0% = 183.7
Shot%: 22.6%
eFG%: 63.0%
True shooting%: 65.1%

*Tempo-neutral stats courtesy of kenpom.com.

Five Perimeter Marksmen (attempted ten or fewer two-point shots)
1) Jeff Elorriaga (Boise State)
60.0% 3PT (5-for-6 on two-pointers)

2) Norman Hobbie (Brown)
58.3% (1-for-3)

3) Jaylen Shaw (South Carolina)
58.3% (3-for-4)

4) Eli Harrison (Dartmouth)
55.6% (1-for-5)

5) Naz Long (Iowa State)
55.0% (6-for-9)

Previous Installments
November 11
December 4
December 11

VIDEO: Boise State robbed of insane, buzzer-beating win on incorrect timing by officials

Screen Shot 2016-02-11 at 1.07.34 AM
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It looked like James Webb III of Boise State had hit the season’s craziest buzzer-beater.

With 0.8 seconds left, he caught an in-bounds pass on the run on the right wing, hoisted up a prayer of a three and watched as it banked it as the buzzer sounded.

It’s pretty fantastic:

And it also clearly left his hands before time expired, but there was a reason for that. According to the officials, the clock (for the road team, mind you) did not start when the ball was caught.

They were right.

Where they were wrong was determining that it took more than a second for Webb to catch and release the shot, meaning that they were wrong to waive off the bucket.

This awesome slo-mo clip of the shot from Matt Stephens of the Coloradoan is all the evidence I need, but if you need more, Sportscenter anchor Scott Van Pelt clocked it at 0.7 seconds:

The game would go to overtime, where Colorado State would go on to win, 97-93.

As you can imagine, Boise State players and coaches were livid with the call.

“I hope it’s not a situation where you get an apology later but don’t get the win. I don’t understand it,” head coach Leon Rice said in a radio interview after the game. “I hope they got it right somehow, some way. I don’t know. It didn’t look right to me, but I’m not the official.”

This comes just four days after officials blew a call in a game between New Mexico and San Diego State that allowed the Aztecs to force overtime and eventually beat the Lobos. (That call may have determined the outcome of the Mountain West regular season title, to boot.)

New Mexico was essentially told, “my bad”, but the league as a result.

And Boise State will probably get the same treatment despite the fact that, if the league determines that the referees botched this call as well, the tame technically was over then.

Will they have the guts to award the Broncos a road win that they earned and deserve?

I doubt it.

UPDATE: Here’s a statement from the officiating crew:

Tulsa rallies to hand No. 16 SMU 1st home loss 82-77

Tulsa guard James Woodard (10) shoots a free throw during the second half of an NCAA college basketball game against SMU Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2016, in Dallas.  Tulsa won 82-77. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
(AP Photo/LM Otero)
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DALLAS (AP) Shaquille Harrison had 21 points, Pat Birt hit a crucial 3-pointer and scored 12 of his 17 points after halftime and Tulsa rallied from eight points down in the second half to beat No. 16 SMU 82-77 on Wednesday night.

Nic Moore scored 27 to lead the Mustangs (20-3, 9-3 American Athletic). They lost for the first time in 13 home games and dropped to 2-3 since their 18-0 start to a season that won’t include postseason play because of NCAA sanctions.

Moore twice hit 3-pointers to pull SMU within a point in the final minute, but Birt answered the first with a 3 and James Woodard followed the second with two of his six free throws in the final 1:04.

The Golden Hurricane (16-8, 8-4) ended a four-game losing streak against SMU with their eighth win in 10 games since an 0-2 conference start.