NCAA files new requests in O’Bannon lawsuit

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Less than a month after the plaintiffs in the Ed O’Bannon lawsuit filed a request for a summary judgement the NCAA filed a request of its own on Thursday night, asking U.S. District Federal Judge Claudia Wilken to not issue an injunction that would prohibit the NCAA and its membership from limiting what scholarship athletes receive. Also of note is the NCAA’s request that a decision be made regarding the use of player likenesses without going to trial.

In that request, according to Steve Berkowitz of USA Today, were new statements from conference and school administrators arguing that removing limits on what athletes can receive would impact competition. In its filing in November the plaintiffs argued that this would not be the case, and that the NCAA had not supplied enough evidence to back up that claim.

One of the reasons for the limits, as stated by the NCAA in its most recent filing, is what such measures would do to the competitive balance of collegiate athletics.

“Competitive balance” among schools is enhanced by limits on athlete compensation.

A statement from Baylor University President Kenneth Starr says in part: “Even for the schools that did decide to make payment to its student-athletes, there would be a wide variation of the amount and method of these payments which would ultimately result in a destruction of competitive balance among the paying schools.”

Aren’t these issues already becoming a factor in collegiate athletics? Coaching salaries, training/practice facilities and conference realignment have all impacted the competitive balance in college sports in recent years, as those who have such advantages are generally better-positioned than their counterparts who are lacking in such areas.

And in order to keep up with the arms race some schools have made tough choices, like Temple deciding last week to cut seven sports. Could taking steps to meet the full cost of attendance for scholarship athletes in revenue sports result in more schools having to cut sports that don’t bring in as much revenue? While that’s a tough question to answer definitively, administrators sound convinced that such a move would me a negative for collegiate athletics.

Michigan State athletics director Mark Hollis’ statement says, in part: “it is highly unlikely that Michigan State could offset a $10 million shortfall [created by paying certain student-athletes fifty percent of broadcast revenue] without cutting between 4 and 8 sports.”

The case is expected to go to trial in the summer of 2014, and the verdict will likely change the course of collegiate athletics one way or another.

Stanford loses key veteran guard to stress fracture

Marcus Allen
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Stanford guard Marcus Allen will be out indefinitely after suffering a stress fracture in his right foot, the school announced on Monday evening.

“We want to make sure Marcus is fully healthy before returning to the court,” Stanford coach Johnny Dawkins said in a statement. “Marcus played at a high level during our summer exhibition competition in Italy, where he was one of our leading scorers. We will certainly miss him as we continue to prepare for the season, but we are fortunate that this happened now and he will be back before he knows it.”

The loss of Allen is a potentially brutal blow in an already-thin back court. The 6-foot-3 Allen started 23 games as a sophomore last season, averaging 6.4 points and 3.5 boards. But he averaged 11.4 points and 5.4 boards as the Cardinal made a run to the NIT championship and looked poised to be able to replace the departed Chasson Randle’s production this year.

What’s worse is that without Allen, Stanford does not return a single player in their back court that averaged more than 11.5 minutes. Sophomore Robert Cartwright looks poised to step into the starting point guard role, but neither Dorian Pickens nor Christian Sanders looked like they were ready for that kind of role in the Pac-12 last season. Dawkins does return Malcolm Allen, Marcus’ twin brother, who sat out last season with a broken wrist.

The good news is that Stanford’s front court is strong enough to carry the Cardinal until Marcus is healthy. Rosco Allen, Reid Travis and Michael Humphrey will be able to hold their own against any front line in the Pac-12, while Grant Verhoeven and freshman Josh Sharma will provide adequate depth.

Utah lands top-75 center Jayce Johnson

Larry Krystkowiak
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Utah picked up its center of the future on Monday as four-star center Jayce Johnson pledged to the Runnin’ Utes, a source confirmed to The 7-foot Johnson recently cut his list to Cal, Colorado and Utah with the possibility of reclassifying to the Class of 2015.

Regarded as the No. 67 overall prospect in the Class of 2016, Johnson will look to attend Utah in December as a walk-on who will redshirt. While Johnson likely won’t play this season, he does give head coach Larry Krystkowiak another big man to use in practice to go against sophomore center Jakob Poeltl. A solid long-term prospect, Johnson has a good frame to add weight and he’s also skilled finishing with both hands. Utah now has its replacement for Poeltl if he opts to leave for the NBA after the season and he gets an extra semester to work with the program.

Johnson is coming off of his official visit to Utah this weekend as he joins junior college guard Jojo Zamora in the Class of 2016.