LIU-Brooklyn PG Jason Brickman becomes NEC’s all-time assist leader

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In his three-plus seasons at LIU-Brooklyn, senior point guard Jason Brickman has been one of the more productive point guards in the country. With a career average of 8.6 points per game the San Antonio native isn’t a prolific scorer, but when it comes to setting up his teammates Brickman’s been sensational.

On Thursday night Brickman accounted for 21 points and six assists in the Blackbirds’ 96-93 win at NJIT, breaking the Northeast Conference’s career assist record in the process. Now with 808 career assists, Brickman is four helpers ahead of former record-holder Drafton Davis of Marist (the Red Foxes were a member of the NEC before moving to the MAAC in 1997) and by the time this season’s over Brickman will shatter the mark established by Davis.

After averaging 8.5 assists per game last season Brickman’s up to 10.1 per contest, and he’s doing so without the assistance of senior forward Julian Boyd. Boyd suffered another torn ACL prior to the start of the season, and the hope is that the one-time NEC Player of the Year can rejoin the team when conference play begins in January. LIU’s made three straight trips to the NCAA tournament, and Brickman’s leadership at the point has been one of the key reasons why.

Without Boyd LIU’s relied on even greater offensive balance this season, with junior college transfer Gilbert Parga leading four players averaging double figures (entering Thursday’s game) with 11.8 points per game. With the Blackbirds still having at least 20 games left to play (not counting the conference tournament) this season, Brickman could very well eclipse the 1,000-assist mark before his career ends.

The NCAA’s all-time leader in assists is current Buffalo head coach Bobby Hurley, who amassed 1,076 in his four seasons at Duke (1989-93).

Texas lands commitment from top 100 center

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James Banks announced on Thursday that he has committed to Texas, joining Jacob Young in Shaka Smart’s first recruiting class as the head coach of the Longhorns.

Banks is an interesting prospect. A 6-foot-10 center from Georgia, Banks is a still-developing prospect that was recruited more on his potential than his immediate ability.

“James Banks emerged as a good low post prospect this spring and summer,” NBC Recruiting Analyst Scott Phillips said. “With a good set of hands, some offensive potential and a frame that can add weight, Banks is a nice upside grab for Texas.”

He’s probably a few years away from having a major impact in the Big 12, but he may not have that much time to develop. Cameron Ridley, Prince Ibeh and Conner Lamert all graduate after this season, meaning that Banks is going to have to contribute immediately when he sets foot on the Austin campus for the 2016-17 season.

Texas has three commitments in the Class of 2015. Smart convinced Kerwin Roach and Eric Davis to remain committed to the program when he took over for Rick Barnes while he landed a commitment from Tevin Mack, who pledged to Smart when he was at VCU.

Memphis guard could miss season with shoulder injury

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Memphis just cannot catch a break.


It’s to the point where I almost feel bad for Josh Pastner.

Today, reported that Kedren Johnson, a 6-foot-4 point guard that was on track towards being an all-SEC point guard at Vanderbilt, could end up missing the season due to a shoulder injury. If he can handle the pain he can avoid surgery and play with the injury, but at the very least, Johnson is going to be less than his best.

Johnson averaged 6.7 points and 2.7 assists last season for the Tigers. He sat out 2013-14 after leaving Vanderbilt and entered last season incredibly out of shape. There was hope that he would be able to make a bigger impact this season and help fill the void at the point guard spot.

This news comes on the heels of Memphis finding out that Jaylen Fisher is heading to UNLV. Who’s Jaylen Fisher? Well, he’s a point guard and top 40 recruit from Memphis that was Pastner’s No. 1 recruiting target that opted to leave the city for his college hoops instead of play for the Tigers.

That’s a bad sign, but not quite as bad as Memphis losing star center Austin Nichols — another local kid — to a transfer over the summer. Nichols transferred to Virginia.