Pregame Shootaround: No. 3 Kentucky meets No. 20 Baylor in Arlington

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GAME OF THE NIGHT: No. 3 Kentucky vs. No. 20 Baylor, 10:00 p.m. (ESPN)

This isn’t a difficult choice, as the meeting between the Wildcats and Bears at the site of this season’s Final Four is the only contest matching ranked teams. And it’s a chance to make a statement nationally for Baylor, with sophomore Isaiah Austin stating before the game that “Kentucky is not better than us in any way, shape or form.” He’s certainly entitled to that line of thinking, and Austin will be one of the key figures in this contest. Kentucky’s front court features Julius Randle and Willie Cauley-Stein, with the Bears countering with a deep group led by Austin and senior Cory Jefferson. The team that wins the rebounding battle will more than likely emerge victorious, with both teams rebounding at least 43% of their missed shots (UK: 48%, Baylor: 43.6%).

You can read more about this matchup and the other marquee games this weekend here.

WHO’S GETTING UPSET? California (at UCSB, 10:00 p.m.) 

First off, kudos to the Golden Bears for being willing to visit the “Thunderdome,” as few high-major programs would take on such a challenge. And it’s definitely a challenge, as the Gauchos hung with UCLA for much of the night on Tuesday before running out of steam late. Alan Williams is a very good interior player, and UCSB has multiple players capable of knocking down perimeter shots. Cal’s veterans, led by seniors Justin Cobbs and Richard Solomon, will need to keep the group (they have five freshmen) composed in front of what should be a frenzied atmosphere.

MID-MAJOR GAME OF THE NIGHT: Towson at Stephen F. Austin, 9:00 p.m. (ESPN3) 

Both the Tigers and Limberjacks have the pieces needed to make a run at an NCAA tournament berth this season, as both are considered to be serious contenders in their respective leagues. Towson’s Jerrelle Benimon (17.0 ppg, 9.6 rpg, 4.0 apg) should be well-known amongst college basketball diehards by now, but how about SFA’s Jacob Parker? Parker’s (17.1, 7.9) more than doubled his scoring average from a season ago, with his best performance of the season being a 31-point, 11-rebound night in a win over Marshall last month.


1) After suffering a sprained ankle in a loss to Miami on Sunday, Arizona State point guard Jahii Carson is expected to play tonight at DePaul (7:00 p.m., FS1). With Carson not at 100% the Sun Devils will need someone to step up offensively as the look to win at DePaul, with Cleveland Melvin leading the way for the Blue Demons (Brandon Young’s out with an ankle injury).

2) No. 9 Oklahoma State is back in action, as they host South Carolina in the SEC/Big 12 Challenge. Frank Martin’s Gamecocks are young but they compete, and they took Baylor down to the wire back in November. Marcus Smart will look to rebound from a subpar performance in the Cowboys’ Old Spice Classic final loss to Memphis.

3) Of the four ranked teams in action No. 12 UConn has the “easiest” matchup as they host Maine (7:00 p.m., ESPN3). One thing to keep an eye on in this one: how the big men rebound. This should be a game in which the Huskies, who have struggled on the glass, control that aspect of the game.

4) Four MAAC games on the slate, including newcomers Quinnipiac hosting Fairfield (8:30 p.m., ESPN3). The Stags have just one player averaging double figures (Marcus Gilbert- 13.0 ppg, 4.6 rpg) while QU has five, led by versatile guard Zaid Hurst (15.0, 10.7).

5) Not sure that Loyola Marymount has enough to knock off Pittsburgh, but in senior Anthony Ireland the Lions have one of the nation’s best floor generals. This experience should benefit Pitt sophomore PG James Robinson down the line.


  • No. 3 Kentucky vs. No. 20 Baylor, 10:00 p.m. (ESPN)
  • South Carolina at No. 9 Oklahoma State, 9:30 p.m. (ESPNU)
  • Maine at No. 12 UConn, 7:00 p.m. (ESPN3)


  • Loyola Marymount at Pittsburgh, 7:00 p.m. (ESPN3)
  • Arizona State at DePaul, 7:00 p.m. (FS1)
  • Fairfield at Quinnipiac, 8:30 p.m. (ESPN3)

Sister Jean: “I don’t care that you broke my bracket.”

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As Missouri Valley Conference player of the year Clayton Custer came off the floor after Loyola earned its spot in the Elite Eight after beating Nevada, he had to make a quick apology.

He had to tell the Ramblers’ star fan Sister Jean he was sorry. She, of course, had picked Loyola’s Cinderella run to end in the Sweet 16 in her bracket before the start of the tournament.

The apology was quickly accepted.

“I said I don’t care that you broke my bracket,” Sister Jean said. “I’m ready for the next one.

“For a nice little school like ours, we are just so proud of them.”

Michigan’s hot shooting carries them into the Elite Eight past Texas A&M

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Historically known as a team that lived and died with the three-ball, No. 3-seed Michigan had spent the first weekend of the NCAA tournament proving history wrong.

In an ugly game in their opener against Montana, the Wolverines shot 5-for-16 from three while turning the ball over 14 times and managing a measly 61 points. Against Houston in the second round, Michigan shot 8-for-30 from beyond the arc, with one of those threes coming courtesy of Jordan Poole at the buzzer, sending the Wolverines into the Sweet 16 with a 64-63 win.

Put another way, Michigan looked the part of the defensive grinder that they turned into this season.

Against No. 7-seed Texas A&M in the Sweet 16, however, the Wolverines turned into the Golden State Warriors.

Michigan bested the number of three that they had made in the tournament to date, hitting 14-of-24 bombs while shooting 62 percent from the floor in a 99-72 win over an Aggies team that had finally, for the first time since November, looked the part of the SEC title contender that they have the talent to be.

No. 11 Loyola moves on to Elite Eight after beating No. 7 Nevada

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Loyola is in the Elite Eight.

The Ramblers’ dream run through March continued Thursday as they knocked off No. 7 Nevada, 69-68, in South Region semifinal in Atlanta.

Loyola, an 11th seed making its first NCAA tournament appearance since 1985, will play the winner of Kansas State and Kentucky on Sunday for a chance to return to the Final Four for the first time since it won the 1963 national championship.

Marques Townes hit a 3-pointer with under 10 seconds to play to put the Ramblers up four and put the game all but out of reach for Nevada. Townes finished with 18 points while Clayton Custer had 15.  Loyola shot 55.8 percent from the floor for the game.

The Wolf Pack’s Caleb Martin had 21 points while Jordan Caroline had 19. Nevada shot 41.4 percent from the floor.

Nevada looked like it may overwhelm Loyola early as it built a 12-point lead less than seven minutes into the game. The Ramblers, though, struck back by keeping the Wolf Pack off the board for nearly the last 8 minutes of the first half to take a four-point lead into the break.

The strong play considered on the other side of halftime for Loyola, which astonishingly made its first 13 shots of the second half. Still, despite the perfect start, the Ramblers only briefly took a double-digit lead before Nevada sliced it back down below 10.

Loyola’s inability to build a substantial lead came back to bite it as Nevada, the comeback kids of this tournament, mounted its attack on the deficit and had it erased before the under-four timeout, setting up the final frantic minutes of a battle for a spot in the Elite Eight that the Ramblers claimed thanks to Townes’ late triple.

2018 March Madness: Fans in Times Square pick fake teams in Sweet 16 predictions

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NBC Sports went into Times Square this week to ask basketball fans for their Sweet 16 picks.

The only problem?

The teams in the games are not actually playing in the NCAA Tournament.

They aren’t even actually teams.

Hilarity ensued.

Miami’s Bruce Brown declares for draft without an agent

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Bruce Brown wants to hear what the NBA has to say.

The Miami sophomore has declared for the draft but will not hire an agent, the school announced Thursday.

The 6-foot-5 guard averaged 11.4 points, 7.5 rebounds and 4.0 assists per game during his second season with the Hurricanes. He did, though, see his shooting numbers take a tumble compared to his freshman season with his field goal percentage down from 45.9 to 41.5 percent and his 3-point shoot go from 34.7 to 26.7 percent. There’s also the matter of a foot injury that required surgery and kept him off the floor for the ‘Canes’ last 12 games.

By declaring for the draft, Brown can get in front of NBA teams, who will likely take a very close look at his shooting mechanics after that sophomore season downturn. It will also be an opportunity for him to build up his reputation in the professional ranks after spending much of his sophomore season injured.