Late Night Snacks: Big Ten/ACC Challenge concludes in a tie

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GAME OF THE NIGHT: Drexel 85, Cleveland State 82 (3OT) 

Frantz Massenat led the Dragons with 21 points, nine assists and six rebounds, and as a team Drexel converted 14 offensive rebounds into 23 second-chance points. Cleveland State’s Jon Harris scored 27 points to lead the way for the Vikings, with 24 of those points being scored after halftime. Bruiser Flint’s team is now 2-0 since they lost Damion Lee for the season with a torn ACL, and both victories have come in triple overtime. According to ESPN Stats Info, Drexel is the first team since Ball State in 2000 to play consecutive triple overtime contests.


1) North Carolina 79, No. 1 Michigan State 65

Outside of the players in the North Carolina locker room you’d be hard-pressed to find more than a handful of people who believed that the Tar Heels could not only win in East Lansing but do so by a comfortable margin. But that’s exactly what they did, with five players scoring in double figures and the team putting forth a much better effort on the boards. As for the Spartans, there are some questions that need answering in the aftermath of this defeat.

2) No. 8 Wisconsin 48, Virginia 38

This contest was offensively challenged to say the least, with both teams failing to shoot at least 30% from the field. But in the end the Badgers made the plays they needed to make, with guard Josh Gasser figuring prominently in the proceedings. Now 9-0, the Badgers already have wins over Florida (home), Saint Louis (neutral) and Virginia (road).

3) No. 5 Ohio State 76, Maryland 60

Ohio State took care of business as many expected, with Maryland’s turnover issues becoming a factor thanks to the Buckeyes’ perimeter defenders. But of more importance for Ohio State going forward was the performance of LaQuinton Ross, who scored 17 first-half points. They’ll be more balanced than a season ago, but for the Buckeyes to make a run at a national title Ross has to be a consistent scorer.


1) G Rian Pearson (Toledo): In the Rockets’ 91-75 win over Detroit Pearson finished with 30 points and eight rebounds.

2) G Tilman Dunbar (Navy): 28 points, eight rebounds and seven assists in the Midshipmen’s 79-74 win over The Citadel.

3) Iona three-point shooters: The Gaels set a Hynes Center record with 17 made three-pointers (30 attempts) in their 83-74 win over Marist.


1) G Joe Harris (Virginia): Harris scored just two points in the Cavaliers’ 48-38 loss to No. 8 Wisconsin, shooting 1-for-10 from the field.

2) G Ollie Jackson (St. Francis-PA): Jackson shot 1-for-12, scoring four points in the Red Flash’s 57-50 loss to Lehigh.

3) G Dave Sobolewski and JerShon Cobb (Northwestern): Combined to shoot 1-for-14, finishing with nine points, six rebounds and seven turnovers in the Wildcats’ 69-48 loss at N.C. State.


  • North Carolina 79, No. 1 Michigan State 65
  • No. 5 Ohio State 76, Maryland 60
  • No. 7 Louisville 90, Kansas City 62
  • No. 8 Wisconsin 48, Virginia 38
  • No. 14 Villanova 77, Penn 54
  • No. 25 Dayton 56, Delaware State 46


  • Louisville guard Russ Smith asked to come off the bench tonight, citing his poor performance in practice. Smith finished with ten points and 11 assists in the Cardinals’ 90-62 win over Kansas City.
  • George Washington, which finished third in the Wooden Legacy this past weekend, moved to 7-1 with a 93-87 win over Rutgers. Isaiah Armwood led five Colonials in double figures with 20 points and nine rebounds.
  • Tom Droney scored 21 points to help lead a depleted Davidson squad to an 87-78 overtime victory at Charlotte, which won the Puerto Rico Tip-Off last month.
  • Forwards Kyle Casey and Wesley Saunders scored 17 points apiece to lead Harvard to a 72-64 win at Northeastern.
  • Kasey Sheppard scored 22 points off the bench to lead Louisiana to an 89-80 win at Louisiana Tech. Elfrid Payton and Shawn Long added 17 apiece for the Ragin’ Cajuns.
  • T.J. Warren scored 22 points and grabbed eight rebounds to lead N.C. State past Northwestern, 69-48. The Wildcats shot 25% from the field.
  • Jamal Jones led four Aggies in double figures with 21 points to go along with seven rebounds in Texas A&M’s 74-57 win over Houston.
  • Terone Johnson scored 18 points and Ronnie Johnson added 15 in Purdue’s 88-67 win over Boston College.
  • Miami guard Rion Brown scored 25 points but no other Hurricane managed to score more than five in their 60-49 loss at Nebraska.
  • Will Cummings and Dalton Pepper scored 16 points apiece and Anthony Lee added a double-double (15 points, 11 rebounds) in Temple’s 77-69 win over Saint Joseph’s.

Book from former Indiana player alleges Knight abuse


Former Indiana coach Bob Knight is accused of punching a player with a closed fist, breaking a clipboard over a player’s head and grabbing players by the testicles and squeezing in a book authored by former Hoosier Todd Jadlow, according to a report from WTHR-TV in Indianapolis

“If (Knight) did those things today,” Jadlow told WTHR, “he would be in jail.”

The book, titled ‘Jadlow: On The Rebound,’ chronicles Jadlow’s time with the Hoosiers in the mid-to-late-1980s, including the program’s 1987 national championship, as well as his battle with drug and alcohol addiction.

What is likely to garner the most attention, though, is the alleged abuses from the Hall of Fame coach, who was accused of mistreating and berating players throughout his career.

Knight won three national championships and the 1984 Olympic gold medal but was dismissed from Indiana in 2000 after school president Myles Brand determined he had violated a “zero tolerance policy.” Knight went on to coach for seven years at Texas Tech before retiring.

“I’m a Knight guy,” Jadlow said. “I’m proud to have played for him and love him like a father; let’s not mistake that. But this was the life we led when we were playing for him.”

Jadlow’s claims aren’t exactly surprising given the history of allegations against Knight, but seeing them laid out is still rather disturbing. Among them in the book, according to WTHR, are as follows:

  • Jadlow was punched in the back of the head by Knight during a walkthrough for an NCAA tournament game against Seton Hall.
  • Knight broke a clipboard over Jadlow’s head in 1989 in a game against Louisville.
  • Jadlow’s sides were left with bruises after Knight dug his hands into him.
  • Knight “made a habit” of “grabbing players by the testicles and squeezing.”
  • Knight grabbed Daryl Thomas by the neck and shook him after the 1986 NCAA tournament.

Certainly ugly stuff.

UCLA freshman to miss 4-6 weeks with knee injury

UCLA head coach Steve Alford, second from right, watches action against Cal Poly with his assistant coaches in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game in Los Angeles, Sunday, Nov. 15, 2015. (AP Photo/Michael Baker)
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The degree of difficulty just went up for UCLA in a season that was already likely to be filled with intrigue.

Ike Anigbogu, one of the members of the Bruins’ highly-touted recruiting class, suffered a torn meniscus in his right knee and will miss 4-to-6 weeks, UCLA coach Steve Alford announced Tuesday.

The 6-foot-10 center is one-third of Alford’s top-10 2016 class, which also included five stars Lonzo Ball and T.J. Leaf. He wasn’t as highly regard as those two, but Anigbogu was a consensus top-50 recruit coming out of Corona, Calif. He averaged a double-double for UCLA during their foreign trip this summer.

“We’re optimistic we’ll have him back in four weeks so not going to miss a lot,” Alford said, according to Bruin Report Online. “The first three games probably.”

The Bruins aren’t without depth to weather the loss of Anigbogu as returning center Thomas Welsh averaged 11.2 points and 8.5 rebounds a game as a sophomore year ago and of course Leaf will play a major role.

Still, it’s a blow for a team that whose future appears so dependent on a group of freshmen, to lose one to start the season complicates the issue.

“Ike is doing a lot of good things,” Alford said. “Fortunately it’s a small tear. It’s not a major tear. I don’t think it’s going ot be a huge setback, but every time you have an injury there’s a setback.”

The timetable for Anigbogu’s return is interesting as if he’s able to hit the short end of the rehab window, which Alford repeatedly indicated they expected, he could be back for UCLA’s toughest stretch of non-conference games, starting with Kentucky on Dec. 3, then against Michigan on Dec. 10 and Ohio State on Dec. 17 before the Bruins open Pac-12 play against league favorite Oregon.

Duke’s Jayson Tatum injured during ‘Pro Day’ practice

Jayson Tatum (photo courtesy Duke Athletics)
Courtesy Duke Athletics
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Duke freshman Jayson Tatum suffered an injury to his left foot during Duke’s pro day practice on Tuesday.

The severity of the injury is not yet known.

Tatum suffered the injury on what was a “routine landing”, according to someone that attended the practice, and it was immediately apparent he was in pain. Another source added that Tatum left the court without putting any pressure on the foot.

Tatum is a top five prospect in the Class of 2016 and a potential No. 1 pick in the 2017 draft. He’s been as impressive as any player during the first month of practice, multiple sources have said.

Duke is currently without their other top five prospect, as freshman Harry Giles III is still recovering from a knee procedure last month. It’s unclear just how much Giles will provide this season, as this was the third surgery on his knees.

Miami beats out Kansas and Florida for 2017 center

Jim Larranaga
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Jim Larranaga and Miami just won a big recruiting battle.

Deng Gak, a 6-foot-11 center in the Class of 2017, committed to the Hurricanes on Tuesday over the likes of Kansas and Florida.

“First off I’d like to thank my family for supporting me throughout this long process,” Gak wrote on Twitter, “and all the coaches that recruited me up to this point.

“After thinking long and hard, I’ve decided that the University of Miami is the best fit for me to continue my education and basketball career!”

Gak made an official visit to Miami last month, but followed it up with visits to Gainesville and Lawrence before ultimately deciding to pledge to the Hurricanes.

Ranked in the top-100 by Rivals, Gak joins a strong 2017 class for Larranaga. The Hurricanes already have a commitment from four-star point guard Chris Lykes as well as highly-regarded New Zealand power forward Sam Waardenburg.

Miami would appear to have plenty recruiting momentum at the moment, coming off a 2016 class that included McDonald’s All-American Dewan Huell and top-50 guard Bruce Brown.

After busy summer, a healthy Krzyzewski ready to lead Duke

DURHAM, NC - FEBRUARY 06:  Head coach Mike Krzyzewski of the Duke Blue Devils directs his team during their game against the North Carolina State Wolfpack at Cameron Indoor Stadium on February 6, 2016 in Durham, North Carolina. Duke won 88-80.  (Photo by Grant Halverson/Getty Images)
Grant Halverson/Getty Images
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DURHAM, N.C. (AP) Mike Krzyzewski is embracing the grind of another year at Duke after an offseason that was exceptionally busy – even by his standards.

The winningest men’s coach in Division I history is coming off a summer in which he had four surgeries and led the U.S. men’s national basketball team to a third Olympic gold medal.

The Hall of Fame coach who turns 70 in February joked his summer was “a cruise” and proclaimed himself healthy and ready to lead a loaded Duke team that looks capable of contending for a sixth national championship and third since 2010.

“I’m good, and everything that happened was curable and needed to be taken care of, and was taken care of,” Krzyzewski said. “And now I’m raring to go.”

Krzyzewski’s offseason and subsequent return to full health figure to be popular topics of discussion Wednesday when Atlantic Coast Conference coaches and players gather in Charlotte, North Carolina, for the league’s annual preseason media day.

His health drew widespread concern last February when he missed a game at Georgia Tech – the first time he didn’t travel with his team since 1995 – and briefly was hospitalized with what he recently said was dehydration, high blood pressure and “a little bit of exhaustion,” though he was back at work the next day .

Krzyzewski – who had both hips replaced in the 1990s – also had his left knee replaced in April, had hernia surgery a month later and underwent two operations on his left ankle in June.

The procedure on his knee – which prompted his daughter, Debbie Krzyzewski Savarino, to dub him “the bionic man” – was key, he said.

“It’s one of those times that can happen to anybody where you get a series of physical setbacks,” Krzyzewski said. “Part of the reason I was exhausted was, I had a bad knee, and I really think that whatever happened when we were going to Georgia Tech, a lot of it had to do with me having a bad knee for a couple months and knowing I was already going to get the knee replacement, because I (was) still pushing it.”

Krzyzewski said he’s known both of his knees have been “bone-on-bone” for a while, started feeling pain in the left knee at the beginning of the 2015-16 season and knew it had to be replaced.

But he kept it a secret for most of the season – at times even hiding a knee brace underneath his long pants so Duke’s players and fans couldn’t tell he was wearing one. And while the public didn’t know there was a problem, Savarino said the family noticed in the summer of 2015 that her dad was walking differently.

“Although he never really said a word about it at all, it was hard to watch him walk out on the court and just be a little bit nervous about, is his knee going to lock up on him?” Savarino said.

Coincidentally, just down the road in Chapel Hill, Krzyzewski’s fiercest rival was dealing with a similar situation.

North Carolina coach Roy Williams had a similar surgery in May to replace his right knee , which means that between them, they have seven national titles and four artificial joints. Williams, 66, said he feels comfortable enough to stand for longer stretches than he did last season, while the Tar Heels advanced to the NCAA Tournament title game.

“It does feel better, and it’s been a long process,” Williams said.

Krzyzewski’s procedures left him feeling similarly spry, especially after completing pre- and post-surgery exercises to keep his quadriceps strong. He looked and felt fine during his final run with the U.S. team, leading them to one final gold medal before San Antonio Spurs coach Gregg Popovich takes over.

And with his focus now fully on the Blue Devils, he says he feels younger than before and is showing no signs of slowing down. He says now he can get more hands-on during practice than he could last year, when he left much of the on-court work with the players to his assistants.

“I knew I was going to be better. I knew that leg was going to be straight,” he said. “I knew that I’d have more energy and I knew that I needed to get ready for the Olympics. So in a very short period of time, I was well, and my knee is terrific. I’m like the poster boy for knee replacement.”

AP Basketball Writer Aaron Beard in Chapel Hill contributed to this report.

AP College Basketball site: http://collegebasketball.ap.org