Marshall Henderson’s on-court antics aren’t changing. Deal with it


BROOKLYN — Marshall gonna be Marshall.

At this point, I think it is safe to say that he’s never going to change, at least on the court.

And while he may be the scourge of every stodgy sportswriter on Twitter, in all honesty, is there really anything wrong with that?

On Saturday night, with seven minutes left in Ole Miss’ 79-76 win over Penn State in the finals of the Barclays Center Classic, Marshall Henderson buried a three with a Penn State defender in his face to open up a four-point lead. He immediately turned around and, quite clearly, yelled at a father and son sitting court side that had been razzing him the entire game. Keep in mind, the listed attendance for the game was 3,088, but that also included the folks that had made the trip from Queens to see St. John’s play in the opener. The gym was pretty empty, and the game was broadcast on the NBC Sports Network.

Simply put, everyone at the game and all the people back home watching on TV saw this. Teddy Valentine certainly did, as he immediately blew his whistle, wrapped his arm around Henderson’s waist and brought the fiery gunslinnger over to his sideline for a scolding.

“Someone said something to him from the crowd and he responded,” head coach Andy Kennedy said after the game. “Ted came over and said, ‘listen, don’t talk to the fans. They can talk to you, but you can’t talk to them.'”

This came a night after Henderson got into a bit of a tussle after the Rebels knocked off Georgia Tech. According to Matt Norlander, Henderson was knocked to the floor as the buzzer sounded and had to be pulled back by his teammates as he chirped at the Yellow Jackets in the handshake line.

That’s just who Henderson is on the court.

It hasn’t changed yet, and it’s probably never going to change.

Quite frankly, it’s not that big of a deal. So he gets a little too fired up and yaps a little bit too much. His coaches are clearly OK with it because he’s still playing. His suspension wasn’t for his actions on the floor. His teammates are OK with it because he’s not only the biggest trash-talker on the team, but he may also be the best teammate. This is the same guy that was so fired up on the bench while his teammates were making a run that he slapped Martavious Newby on the rear-end hard enough that Newby audibly yelped in pain. It’s the same guy who is coming off the bench and has seen his scoring average dip five points this season, yet was the first guy celebrating when it was announced Demarco Cox was the tourney MVP.

He’s not exactly the posterchild for sportsmanship and class clearly went out the window a long time ago, but all things considered, he’s pretty harmless on a basketball court.

The real issue is his behavior off the court, which has been well-documented. Multiple arrests, one for using counterfeit money to buy drugs, and quite a bit of drinking at inopportune times. That’s where his development needs to happen. That’s where he really needs to grow, and no one outside of that Ole Miss locker room — hell, no one outside of Marshall Henderson — will truly know if he’s made that change. A ban on media access and social media usage will keep him out of the headlines, but it’s not going to make Henderson a better person.

Henderson’s on-court antics make him, at best, entertaining and the villain of college hoops. At worst, he’s a distraction to his team and his team alone. He’s a volume-shooter on an Ole Miss team that would surprise if it made the NCAA tournament. He’s not an NBA prospect. He’s got five more months of relevance, if you can call it that. Hand-wringing over him “changing” on the court seems pointless.

Where Henderson needs to change is who he is off the court.

He’s the only one that can do that, and there’s certainly no way to know if that’s happened simply by watching him play basketball for two hours.

POSTERIZED: Wyoming’s Josh Adams takes flight

Josh Adams
Associated Press
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Not only is Wyoming senior guard Josh Adams the lone returning starter from a team that won the Mountain West tournament last season, but he’s also one of college basketball’s best dunkers. And if anyone may have forgotten about his jumping ability, Adams put it on display Saturday during the Cowboys’ win over Montana State.

After splitting two Montana State players at the top of the key Adams attacked the basket, dunking with two hands over a late-arriving help-side defender. If you’re going to rotate over, have to do it quicker than that.

Video credit: Wyoming Athletics

Defensive progress will determine No. 4 Iowa State’s ceiling

Monte Morris
Associated Press
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Even with the coaching change from Fred Hoiberg to Steve Prohm, No. 4 Iowa State remains one of the nation’s best offensive teams. Given their skills on that end of the floor many teams find it tough to go score for score with the Cyclones, and that’s what happened to Illinois in Iowa State’s 84-73 win in the Emerald Coast Classic title game.

Georges Niang scored 23 points and grabbed eight rebounds, with Monté Morris adding 20, nine rebounds and six assists and Abdel Nader 18 points as the Cyclones moved to 5-0 on the season. The three-pointers weren’t falling in the second half, as Iowa State shot 0-f0r-12, but they shot 19-for-24 inside of the arc to pull away from a team that lost big man Mike Thorne Jr. late in the first half to a left knee injury.

Illinois’ loss of size in the paint opened things up offensively for Iowa State, and the Cyclones took advantage. But where this group grabbed control of the game was on the defensive end of the floor, and that will be the key for a team with Big 12 and national title aspirations.

Nader took on the responsibility of defending Illinois’ Malcolm Hill (20 points) in the second half and did a solid job of keeping the junior wing in check, with that serving as the spark to a 12-2 run that put the game away. There’s no denying that the Cyclones can put points on the board; most of the talent from last season is back and the productivity on that end of the floor hasn’t changed as a result. Niang’s one of the nation’s best forwards, and both Morris (who now ranks among the country’s best point guards) and Nader have taken significant strides in their respective games.

Iowa State will add Deonte Burton in December, giving them another option to call upon. Front court depth is a bit of a concern, as Iowa State can ill afford to lose a Niang or Jameel McKay, but there’s enough on the roster to compensate for that and force mismatches in other areas.

But the biggest question for this group is how effective they can become at stringing together stops. Illinois certainly had its moments in both halves Saturday night, but Iowa State also showed during the game’s decisive stretch that they can step up defensively. The key now is to do so consistently, and if that occurs the Cyclones can be a threat both within the Big 12 and nationally.