Late Night Snacks: Arizona State earns big home win

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GAME OF THE DAY: Arizona State 79, Marquette 77

The Sun Devils earned a nice home win over a top-25 opponent as the No. 25 Golden Eagles lost a tough one after a second-half comeback. Jordan Bachynski had 14 points, 11 rebounds and seven blocks, as he swatted Derrick Walton’s runner at the end of the game to secure the victory for undefeated Arizona State (6-0).

The Sun Devils had 23 points from Jahii Carson and 21 points from Jermaine Marshall as well in the win.

THE OTHER GAME OF THE DAY: Syracuse 75, Minnesota 67

The Orange only led in this one by two points, 67-65 before pulling away at the end. Syracuse led most of this game despite a so-so effort from Tyler Ennis, who was 1-for-9 from the field, but 10-of-11 from the free throw line and had five assists and no turnovers and five steals.

C.J. Fair had 16 points and 10 rebounds to lead Syracuse while Trevor Cooney contributed 15. The No. 8 Orange advance to the semifinals of the Maui Invitational, where they’ll face California.

THE UPSET?: Dayton 84, No. 11 Gonzaga 79

The Flyers scored 56 second half points to erase a Gonzaga lead and advance in the Maui Invitational. They will play Baylor on Tuesday. More importantly, this was a potentially disastrous loss for Gonzaga. Read why here.


1) In the opening battle of undefeated teams in the Maui Invitational, Cal outlasted Arkansas 81-72 as the Bears showed that they have multiple scorers from multiple places on the floor. Senior guard Justin Cobbs is developed in the mid-range and in the post, senior Richard Soloman and junior David Kravish can both add some scoring punch. Kravish had 19 points and 15 rebounds for Cal and Bird was 3-for-4 behind the three-point for 15 points to lead five Golden Bears in double figures.

2) The No. 3 Kentucky Wildcats held on for a 68-61 win over Cleveland State despite not shooting the ball very well from deep. The Wildcats were only 21 percent from three and the Harrison twins struggled until the final minutes of the game. 

3) BYU held off Texas 86-82 and are off to a 5-1 start an advance to face Wichita State in the championship game of the CBE in Kansas City thanks to a 23-point second-half performance by Tyler Haws. Haws had 25 for the game and scored the go-ahead bucket with under two minutes remaining to give BYU a solid neutral site win against Texas. BYU will likely be the road team against a very pro Shockers crowd in the championship game.


1) The N0. 17 Cyclones moved to 5-0 on the young season with a 110-51 thrashing of UMKC at home. Twelve different players scored for Iowa State and they all played at least six minutes in the balanced scoring attacking for the Cyclones.

2) No. 5 Oklahoma State cruised to a 93-67 road win over South Florida as Marcus Smart and Markel Brown each had 25 points.

3) The No. 7 Buckeyes pulled away from Wyoming for a 65-50 home win. Lenzelle Smith had 20 points and eight rebounds while Amir Williams had 12 points and 16 rebounds.


1) Elon, one of the preseason favorites for the Southern Conference, lost 75-74 at home to Division II Metro State. Metro State nearly beat Rhode Island earlier this season.

2) DePaul allowed No. 12 Wichita State to shoot 59 percent from the field and only had four assists total in a 90-72 loss in the CBE semifinals in Kansas City.

3) Providence shot 27 percent from the field and only 18 percent from three-point range as they struggled to score in their 56-52 loss to Maryland in the opening round of the Paradise Jam. The loss was the first for the Friars on the season.


  •  The No. 15 Gators had 27 points from Casey Prather as Florida cruised to an 86-60 win over Jacksonville.
  • In the Maui Invitational, the No. 18 Baylor Bears defeated Division II host Chaminade 93-77.


  • Xavier cruised past Abilene Christian 93-65 as Semaj Christon had 17 points and six assists.
  • Missouri outlasted IUPUI 78-64 as Jabari Brown finished with 24 points for the 5-0 Tigers.
  • Kyle Fuller pumped in 20 points to lead Vanderbilt to a 77-68 win over St. Mary’s at the Paradise Jam.

Tom Izzo’s point is valid, but he’s wrong about the new fouling rules

Eron Harris, Tom Izzo
AP Photo/Jae C. Hong
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On Sunday night, after No. 3 Michigan State knocked off No. 23 Providence in the final of the Wooden Legacy, Spartans head coach Tom Izzo made sure to make his feelings known about the new college basketball officiating mandates.

He doesn’t like them.

At all.

“I just think we’re taking the flow of the game away,” Izzo said. “Maybe it’ll change. We’ll play by the same rules everybody else does. But I think I can voice my opinion to say that I don’t agree with it.”

Part of what frustrated Izzo was that, in a matchup between the two best players in college basketball, both Denzel Valentine and Kris Dunn were sent to the bench with foul trouble.

“I didn’t like it either way,” Izzo said. “I didn’t like having Denzel on the bench, and I didn’t even like watching Dunn on the bench.”

“Don’t tweet this now and leave out the officials,” he added, according to “It’s not their fault. Because that’s the way they’re mandated to call them. So I am really either blaming the rules committee, which ends up on the coaches somewhat. So I’m looking in the mirror and blaming myself because I should have argued it more maybe. I just don’t think it’s fun to have these guys sitting.”

This is nothing new for Izzo. This was calculated. He basically said the same thing after Michigan State, then No. 1 in the country, beat Oklahoma in the Coaches vs. Cancer Classic two seasons ago, when the rules committee tried to implement these same rules. It was his pushback that started the campaign to get rid of the freedom of movement rules.

But here’s the thing: we all knew this was going to happen. We knew there was going to be an adjustment period, for coaches and players and referees alike. In the long run, freedom of movement is good for basketball. It’s part of the reason the NBA is so much fun to watch these days, as their emphasis on the freedom of movement got us out of the days where the Detroit Pistons were winning titles without scoring 80 points.

Physicality is ingrained in college basketball. Coaches teach defense a certain way. Players play defense a certain way. The guys in the NBA are stronger, but the style of play is much more physical in the college game than the pro game. That doesn’t change overnight.

It changes when those rules are enforced and those fouls are called, and, as a result, the players and coaches learn to adjust to them.

Kennesaw State blows eight-point lead in 16 seconds, loses to Elon

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Kennesaw State entered Monday night at 1-6 on the season, but with 19 seconds left, it looked like the Owls have their second of the season locked up. Kendrick Ray made a pair of free throws with 19 seconds left to put KSU up 89-81, and all they had to do was avoid a complete meltdown to get out with a win.

They couldn’t.

A Luke Eddy layup with 16 seconds left cut the lead to six, and after KSU’s Nigel Pruitt missed two free throws, Dainan Swoope his a three with seven seconds left to make the score 89-86.

On the ensuing inbounds, Kennesaw State threw the ball away … and then proceeded to foul Eddy when he was shooting a three. This is what that disaster looked like:

Eddy would hit all three threes before, shockingly, KSU turned the ball over again. Elon could not capitalize this time, sending the game to overtime, where the Phoenix outscored the Owls 14-4.

Elon won 104-94.

Here’s what the comeback looked like on the play-by-play:

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