Tommy Amaker

Colorado’s second half run results in a missed opportunity for Harvard

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At halftime of their game at Colorado on Sunday afternoon, the Harvard Crimson had the look of a team poised to grab a needed resume-building victory. Leading 42-30, the Crimson executed well on both ends of the floor, finding quality shots offensively while limiting Colorado’s quality looks on the other end.

But as the Crimson began to wear down the Buffaloes were able to wrestle away control of the game with an 18-2 second half run, going on to win 70-62 with Spencer Dinwiddie leading four scorers in double figures with 17 points. But in the win there are concerns for Colorado moving forward, and with non-conference games against Kansas (December 7) and Oklahoma State (December 21 in Las Vegas) still yet to be played the Buffaloes’ execution on both ends needs to become more consistent.

Another concern going forward has to be the shooting of junior guard Askia Booker. Booker scored 12 points on Sunday but did so by shooting 5-for-15 from the field. And on the season he’s shooting 39.3%, and while that’s an improvement on his field goal percentage from a season ago (36.4%) Colorado won’t reach their full potential if Booker isn’t knocking down shots (and just as importantly, taking good shots) at a decent clip.

While Colorado picks up a solid win for their resume the same can’t be said for Harvard, and a look at their remaining non-conference schedule reveals just how important Sunday’s result was. Harvard still has games against Boston College and UConn, and their Great Alaska Shootout opener against Denver will be tougher than some realize. But there aren’t a high number of opportunities to land wins over teams from major conference remaining on the schedule. And if Harvard were to somehow not win the Ivy League that could be an issue for a team that has the look of a group capable of racking up a lot of wins this season.

The return of veterans Kyle Casey and Brandyn Curry gives Harvard two talented players who earned All-Ivy honors before missing the entire 2012-13 season. Add them to a group of returnees from last season’s NCAA tournament squad, which includes guards Siyani Chambers and Laurent Rivard and forward Wesley Saunders, and the Crimson have the pieces needed to not only return to the NCAA tournament but also win a game once there.

But their non-conference schedule doesn’t give Harvard much room for error once Ivy League play begins in January. Harvard should win the Ivy League once again, but if they don’t that could mean trouble come Selection Sunday.

Sun Belt approves new scheduling format

Sun Belt Conference
Sun Belt Conference
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With an 11-member setup the Sun Belt Conference has played a 20-game conference schedule the last couple of years, which may be seen as a positive when it comes to determining the regular season champion (home-and-home between every team). But for a conference that spans from North Carolina (Appalachian State) to Texas (UT-Arlington, Texas State) travel was far from easy in that setup.

And with Coastal Carolina joining next season, it was clear that the league needed to do something with its scheduling.

Thursday the Sun Belt members approved an 18-game conference schedule, which will begin with the 2016-17 season when the league consists of 12 members. Included in the agreement is the assignment of travel partners (similar to setups in the Pac-12 and Ivy League), and teams playing no more than three consecutive conference games on the road.

Schools will also be guaranteed at least five weekend home games during conference play, and there will be no more weekends in which teams play conference games both home and away (thus cutting down on travel). Obviously with the addition of Coastal Carolina the Sun Belt needed to make some changes in their scheduling, and this week the conference made the moves they needed to make.

Former Wichita State assistant returns as a consultant

Chris Jans, Gregg Marshall
Associated Press
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Prior to a one-year stint as the head coach coach at Bowling Green that came to an end in early April as a result of an incident at a Bowling Green restaurant, Chris Jans was a member of Gregg Marshall’s coaching staff at Wichita State from 2007-14. During those seven seasons Jans was a key figure as the Shockers made the progression to a respected national power.

Jans is back in Wichita, with Paul Suellentrop of the Wichita Eagle reporting Thursday that he’s serving as a consultant to the program. Jans’ consulting agreement runs for 45 days, which the school can renew, and he’ll be paid $10,000 for the work. While Jans isn’t allowed to do any coaching, he can watch practices and provide Marshall and the coaching staff with his observations.

“He will be able to consult with the coaching staff, only on what he observes in practice,” said Darron Boatright, WSU deputy athletics director. “By NCAA rule, a consultant is not allowed to have communication with student-athletes … not about basketball-related activities or performance.”

While Jans (who according to the story has served in a similar role for another school) can’t do any coaching in this role, his return does give Marshall another trusted voice to call upon when needed. Wichita State bid farewell to an assistant coach this spring with Steve Forbes being hired as the head coach at East Tennessee State, with his position being filled by former Sunrise Christian Academy coach Kyle Lindsted.