Wednesday’s Pregame Shootaround: No. 21 Iowa State visits Provo

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GAME OF THE NIGHT: No. 21 Iowa State at BYU (9:30 p.m., ESPNU) 

Just a couple days after beating then-No. 7 Michigan in Ames, Fred Hoiberg’s Cyclones visit BYU where they’ll encounter one of the nation’s better backcourt tandems (Tyler Haws and Matt Carlino) and one of the toughest environments around. Much will be made of the altitude, especially when considering the fact that Iowa State only played seven players on Sunday, but that Marriott Center crowd can be a handful as well. BYU has the highest adjusted tempo in America, and that could be an issue for ISU given their relative lack of depth.

WHO’S GETTING UPSET? Harvard (vs. Bryant; 7:00 p.m.) 

The Crimson have won their first three games, but none of those opponents have the talent that the Bryant Bulldogs possess. Expected to contend in the NEC, Tim O’Shea’s Bulldogs are led by the dynamic Dyami Starks (33.3 ppg), and veteran Alex Francis can hold his own as well. Bryant’s one defeat came at Gonzaga in their regular season opener and they’ve also soundly defeated Vermont, so they enter this game having been tested.

MID-MAJOR MATCHUP OF THE DAY: Lipscomb at Belmont (8:00 p.m.) 

Normally a team can be primed for a letdown in the game following a big win, but the fact that their rival is next in line may work to Belmont’s advantage. The Bruins won the first meeting in this season’s edition of the “Battle of the Boulevard,” with J.J. Mann leading five starters in double figures with 21 points in Belmont’s 87-83 victory. How can J.C. Hampton and the Bisons change their luck? By holding their own at the foul line, as Belmont outscored them 33-9 at the charity stripe in that first meeting.


1) Brian Gregory will face his former employer for the first time as Georgia Tech hosts Dayton (7:00 p.m., ESPN3) in Atlanta. Both teams enter the contest with 3-0 records, and one area to keep an eye on will be turnovers. While the Flyers have had some trouble taking care of the basketball (turnover percentage of 21.2%, per kenpom.com), Georgia Tech’s done a good job in this area (14.3%).

2) Northwestern looks to rebound from its loss to Illinois State on Sunday with a win at UIC (8:00 p.m., ESPN3). Chris Collins’ Wildcats trailed by as many as 18 points on Sunday, and they’ll need to keep UIC’s Marc Brown (21.7 ppg) under wraps if they’re to bounce back.

3) Northern Colorado isn’t a team many put atop the Big Sky alongside the likes of Weber State, Montana and North Dakota before the season began, but their win at Kansas State made some people take notice. Tonight the Bears visit preseason WAC favorite North Dakota State.

4) Baylor’s guards will need to keep Charleston Southern’s Saah Nimley in order for the Bears to win as comfortably as expected (7:00 p.m.). Through four games Nimley, one of the best players in theBig South, is averaging 19.3 points and 8.7 assists per contest.

5) There aren’t too many scorers as hot as Evansville’s D.J. Balentine, who’s led the Purple Aces to a 3-0 start with an average of 29.0 points per game. He’s been consistent, scoring 29 points in each of those games, and for the season he’s posted percentages of 52.3% FG, 50.0% 3PT and 92.1% FT.


  • American at No. 8 Ohio State, 7:30 p.m. (Big Ten Network)
  • No. 14 Wichita State at Tulsa, 8:00 p.m. (CBS Sports Network)
  • Charleston Southern at No. 20 Baylor, 7:00 p.m. (ESPN3)


Tom Izzo’s point is valid, but he’s wrong about the new fouling rules

Eron Harris, Tom Izzo
AP Photo/Jae C. Hong
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On Sunday night, after No. 3 Michigan State knocked off No. 23 Providence in the final of the Wooden Legacy, Spartans head coach Tom Izzo made sure to make his feelings known about the new college basketball officiating mandates.

He doesn’t like them.

At all.

“I just think we’re taking the flow of the game away,” Izzo said. “Maybe it’ll change. We’ll play by the same rules everybody else does. But I think I can voice my opinion to say that I don’t agree with it.”

Part of what frustrated Izzo was that, in a matchup between the two best players in college basketball, both Denzel Valentine and Kris Dunn were sent to the bench with foul trouble.

“I didn’t like it either way,” Izzo said. “I didn’t like having Denzel on the bench, and I didn’t even like watching Dunn on the bench.”

“Don’t tweet this now and leave out the officials,” he added, according to CBSSports.com. “It’s not their fault. Because that’s the way they’re mandated to call them. So I am really either blaming the rules committee, which ends up on the coaches somewhat. So I’m looking in the mirror and blaming myself because I should have argued it more maybe. I just don’t think it’s fun to have these guys sitting.”

This is nothing new for Izzo. This was calculated. He basically said the same thing after Michigan State, then No. 1 in the country, beat Oklahoma in the Coaches vs. Cancer Classic two seasons ago, when the rules committee tried to implement these same rules. It was his pushback that started the campaign to get rid of the freedom of movement rules.

But here’s the thing: we all knew this was going to happen. We knew there was going to be an adjustment period, for coaches and players and referees alike. In the long run, freedom of movement is good for basketball. It’s part of the reason the NBA is so much fun to watch these days, as their emphasis on the freedom of movement got us out of the days where the Detroit Pistons were winning titles without scoring 80 points.

Physicality is ingrained in college basketball. Coaches teach defense a certain way. Players play defense a certain way. The guys in the NBA are stronger, but the style of play is much more physical in the college game than the pro game. That doesn’t change overnight.

It changes when those rules are enforced and those fouls are called, and, as a result, the players and coaches learn to adjust to them.

Kennesaw State blows eight-point lead in 16 seconds, loses to Elon

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Kennesaw State entered Monday night at 1-6 on the season, but with 19 seconds left, it looked like the Owls have their second of the season locked up. Kendrick Ray made a pair of free throws with 19 seconds left to put KSU up 89-81, and all they had to do was avoid a complete meltdown to get out with a win.

They couldn’t.

A Luke Eddy layup with 16 seconds left cut the lead to six, and after KSU’s Nigel Pruitt missed two free throws, Dainan Swoope his a three with seven seconds left to make the score 89-86.

On the ensuing inbounds, Kennesaw State threw the ball away … and then proceeded to foul Eddy when he was shooting a three. This is what that disaster looked like:

Eddy would hit all three threes before, shockingly, KSU turned the ball over again. Elon could not capitalize this time, sending the game to overtime, where the Phoenix outscored the Owls 14-4.

Elon won 104-94.

Here’s what the comeback looked like on the play-by-play:

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