Marcus Smart

Tuesday’s Sophomore Showcase more evidence how awesome this season will be

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On Tuesday night, each of the nation’s top four freshmen took to the court.

Jabari Parker went for 21 points, nine boards and six blocks in a win over East Carolina, a performance that also just so happened to include his second ridiculous, coast-to-coast move of the young season. Kentucky’s Julius Randle had 22 points, 10 boards, four assists and two blocks, getting outshined by teammate James Young’s 26 points, in a win over UT-Arlington. Andrew Wiggins, who was overshadowed by 16 points and 13 boards from Joel Embiid, finished with a modest 13 points, seven boards, three assists and two steals in a win over Iona, while Aaron Gordon’s reverse alley-oop was the highlight of Arizona’s win over Rhode Island.

Those four teams and their freshmen phenoms have received an overwhelming amount of hype and coverage early on this season, so it should come as no surprise that the chance to see all four on the same night drew quite a bit of attention.

You’d have to think that irked Marcus Smart a bit.

A Preseason First-Team All-American and the reigning Big 12 Player of the Year, the attention that Smart has gotten this season has been, frankly, non-existent. That changed on Tuesday night, as he put on an absolute show, scoring 26 of his career-high 39 points in the first half as he led Oklahoma State to a dominating, 101-80 victory over No. 11 Memphis.

source:  It truly was an unbelievable performance. Smart was a terror on the defensive end, getting credited with five steals (which seemed low) and two blocks, while showcasing the intangible aspects of his game that has scouts and writers alike salivating. But more importantly, he gotten into a kind of offensive rhythm that we’ve rarely seen from the sophomore. Twice in the first half he reeled off 12 straight Oklahoma State points, including a flurry of three straight threes that put Memphis in a double-digit hole they’re never be able to climb out of.

(MORE: Marcus Smart throws down the gauntlet)

It was, unquestionably, the most dominant performance that we had seen to date.

The problem?

He wasn’t the only sophomore point guard with a statement to make.

Jahii Carson, Arizona State’s dynamic lead guard, may have done Smart one better. At the very least, he did in the scoring column, finishing with 40 points and seven assists as the Sun Devils went into the Thomas & Mack Center and knocked off a rejuvenated UNLV team.

Carson, another Preseason All-American that returned for his sophomore season, is more-or-less a known quantity at this point. He’s a super-quick, uber-athletic playmaker that is so difficult to keep out of the lane he can still put up numbers like he did tonight despite the fact that everyone knows he doesn’t go left.

I don’t think Smart was the only guy upset about all the attention that the freshmen class has been getting.

Don’t worry, fellas.

We haven’t forgotten about you.

In fact, this budding rivalry between the freshmen and the returners is part of what makes this season so special. Think about it. I’ve mention six legitimate superstars at the collegiate level to this point in this column. Six. With the exception of Carson, it’s not crazy to think that the other five could end up being the top five picks in the NBA Draft.

You know who I haven’t mentioned?

Doug McDermott. Or Russ Smith. Or Gary Harris. Or Mitch McGary. Or Aaron Craft. Or Shabazz Napier.

The list goes on.

There is as much star-power, from coast to coast, as there has been in college basketball since at least the 2007-2008 season, when Derrick Rose, Kevin Love, Michael Beasley, Eric Gordon and O.J. Mayo were dominating campuses across the country. And not only are there stars, but those stars play on really good teams. The general consensus is that the top six — Michigan State, Kansas, Kentucky, Duke, Louisville and Arizona — are all very legitimate title contenders, a number that is larger than we are used to seeing. And that was before Oklahoma State did everything they could to play their way onto that list.

Star power. Great teams. Balance. And as good as all of that is, it’s not what makes this season so special.

What makes this year so great is that, on a night where there was this much talent on display, the kid that was the best player to take the court was … Frank Kaminsky?

(MORE: Read about Kaminsky’s memorable night)

If you don’t know who that is, he’s Wisconsin’s newest starting center. He entered the day having scored 26 points this season and 133 points in his career. His career-high in college was 19 points. His career-high ever? 39 points.

And on Tuesday, he stole the show.

Kaminsky finished with 43 points on 16-for-18 shooting, hitting all six of his threes.

Should I mention we’re just 10 days into the year?

Yup.

This is going to be fun.

VIDEO: John Calipari vows to lose some weight

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John Calipari has a goal this offseason: to lose some weight.

“Mid-50s, I let it go a little bit,” Calipari said as he worked out on an elliptical. “Had a heck of a year. But going forward, gotta get in better shape. Gotta get the body right. Started a week ago. What I will say to you is really simple. I’m not showing you my body for a month.”

The reason why Cal needs to get into shape?

He’s going to have to coach this year, because Tyler Ulis is heading to the NBA.

“I shoulda got some of his salary,” Ulis joked.

Cal won’t have to coach too hard. He’s got one of the best recruiting classes in the country coming into the program, including three top ten players and five of the nation’s top 30 prospects.

Four-star PG Jaylen Fisher de-commits from UNLV

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Coaching changes can wreak havoc on a program’s recruiting class, and that’s been the case for UNLV thanks to the tumultuous nature of their search for a new head coach. Thursday evening one prospect who remained committed to the Mountain West program throughout the process that ultimately led to Marvin Menzies landing the job announced that he’s decided to reopen his recruitment.

Four-star point guard Jaylen Fisher, ranked 55th in the Class of 2016 by Rivals.com, announced via social media that he’s decided to de-commit from UNLV.

“I was very much looking forward to the opportunity to be a Rebel this year,” Fisher wrote. “But there have been a lot of changes with the program since I committed to UNLV; changes that have made me reconsider whether UNLV is still a good fit for me. So with that in mind and after much consideration with my family, I have decided it’s best that I reopen my recruitment.”

Fisher’s decision leaves wing Justin Jackson as the lone member of UNLV’s 2016 class at this point, with Jackson telling Scout.com in early April that he was undecided as to whether or not he’d reopen his recruitment. The school’s search for a coach began in January when they parted ways with Dave Rice, promoting Todd Simon in an interim role.

After deciding not to retain Simon, who’s now the head coach at Southern Utah, UNLV hired former Little Rock head coach Chris Beard…who left for Texas Tech less than two weeks later. UNLV landed Menzies, who they passed over for Beard, and he’s got a lot of work to do to field a roster that will be competitive in the Mountain West next season.

As for Fisher, the Arlington, Tennessee native should be a popular prospect with his decision to reopen things. And with Memphis losing former commit Charlie Moore, the Tigers are in need of help at the point. The question now is whether or not new head coach Tubby Smith will look to reach out to Fisher.

h/t Memphis Commercial-Appeal

NCAA rule change that impacts Memphis coaching staff now official

Memphis forward Dedric Lawson (1) goes up for a shot between Connecticut forward Shonn Miller (32) and guard Daniel Hamilton, right, during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game in the finals of the American Athletic Conference men's tournament in Orlando, Fla., Sunday, March 13, 2016. (AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack)
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One of the more popular topics in college basketball in recent weeks was the status of Memphis assistant coach Keelon Lawson and sons Dedric and K.J. in the aftermath of the school hiring Tubby Smith. Would Smith keep the elder Lawson on staff as an assistant, thus in all likelihood ensuring that Dedric and K.J. would return as well? Would he let go or attempt to reassign Keelon, and as a result risk losing two players from an already limited roster?

Ultimately Smith decided to reassign Keelon to a non-coaching position, making him director of player development. And with the NCAA having a rule that those with a connection to a prospective student-athlete had to serve in a coaching capacity for the player’s first two seasons, the question was whether or not Memphis would need a waiver to pull off the move.

Luckily for Memphis the NCAA was looking into an alteration of the rule, and on Thursday with the NCAA not taking action on Proposal 2015-30 the change became official.

Under the new rule a coach’s two years on staff would begin immediately upon his arrival. In the case of Lawson this is key as he spent a year on former Memphis head coach Josh Pastner’s staff before Dedric and K.J. enrolled. With the two-year requirement ruled to be served under the new proposal, Smith could reassign Keelon Lawson without having to ask the NCAA for a waiver.

The next step as far as Memphis is concerned is Dedric, who ultimately entered his name into the NBA Draft pool (without an agent), withdrawing and returning to school for his sophomore season. As a freshman Dedric was the best freshman in the American Athletic Conference, averaging 15.8 points and 9.3 rebounds per game for the Tigers. DraftExpress.com currently ranks him 28th amongst college freshmen, which makes him no sure thing to be drafted should he decide to stay in the draft.

At the very least the next month should result in Dedric receiving constructive feedback from NBA scouts and executives that he can use to improve next season.

K.J. played in just ten games last season due to a lingering Achilles tendon issue, averaging 8.8 points and 3.5 rebounds per game. The hope is that K.J. will be granted a medical redshirt for last season, thus preserving a year of eligibility.

Chattanooga men’s hoop coach McCall gets 2-year extension

Chattanooga head coach Matt McCall directs his team during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game against Iowa State, Monday, Nov. 23, 2015, in Ames, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
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CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) Chattanooga men’s basketball coach Matt McCall has received a two-year contract extension after leading the Mocs to an NCAA Tournament appearance in his debut season.

The school announced the extension Thursday. McCall’s contract now runs through the 2021-22 season.

Chattanooga went 29-6 last season to set a school record for victories. The Mocs captured their first Southern Conference regular-season title since 1994 and also won the league’s postseason tournament to earn their first NCAA bid since 2009.

Indiana beat Chattanooga 99-74 in the first round of the NCAA Tournament.

Athletic director David Blackburn said in a statement, “We had great confidence in who we hired a year ago, and that never wavered. This is in recognition of him and his staff’s great work in equipping our student-athletes for success.”

Jim Valvano’s title-winning N.C. State team to finally get White House visit

FILE - In this April 5, 1983, file photo, North Carolina State coach Jim Valvano embraces sophomore forward Lorenzo Charles moments after Charles had dunked a shot to give North Carolina State the win over Houston in the national championship game at the Final Four of the NCAA college basketball tournament in Albuquerque, N.M. (AP Photo/Leonard Ignelzi, File)
(AP Photo/Leonard Ignelzi, File)
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The N.C. State men’s basketball team never got invited to the White House after they won the 1983 National Title.

It wasn’t a tradition in those days. They spoke with President Ronald Reagan, but they did so from the confines of a television studio in Raleigh. It’s commonplace now to see title winners from all sports making their way to the Oval Office to shake hands with our nation’s leader, but back then, the funding and invitation weren’t always available.

And that never say right with the guys on that team. Since Lorenzo Charles, whose memorable dunk was the title-winning bucket, passed away in 2011, that team has had a reunion every spring, and the topic of going to the White House to celebrate the win always came up. That inspired Thurl Bailey, who was the No. 7 pick of the 1983 NBA Draft, and his friend, Utah Senator Orrin Hatch, to write letters to President Obama requesting that the ’83 iteration of the Wolfpack get their White House visit.

“As definitive as a National Championship sounds, as an athlete there always seems to be unfinished business,” Bailey told N.C. State’s website. “You’re always looking for the next challenge, the next opportunity. This was it for me.  If I could get this done, it would be yet another story for me and the other members of that team to be able to pass along to our kids, grandkids and generations after that.”

Bailey’s efforts proved successful.

On Thursday, N.C. State announced that President Obama had not only received the letters, but he has issued a May 9th invitation for that 1983 team to visit him in Washington, D.C., meaning that Bailey, Dereck Whittenburg and the rest of that 1983 title-winning team will finally get to meet the Commander-in-Chief.

“The joy and the euphoria of winning a national title against all odds, as well as the pain and devastation of losing members of that family, are important parts of who I am,” Bailey said. “Contacting President Obama was one piece of our incredible journey that had eluded us for far too long.”