The Secondary Break: Tuesday’s Links

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J.J. Mann’s journey from scholarship bubble to buzzer beater (Sports Illustrated)
Belmont’s J.J. Mann made national headlines on Sunday afternoon, as his three-pointer with 13.1 seconds remaining gave the Bruins a lead they would not relinquish at then-No. 12 North Carolina. So how did Mann wind up at Belmont? A prep year spent at Hargrave Military Academy proved to be the stop he needed in order to earn a scholarship offer, and in the end both Mann and Belmont have reaped the benefits.

Virginia’s Joe Harris has big dreams (ESPN)
Virginia senior guard Joe Harris is one of the nation’s best perimeter players, and in his final season in Charlottesville Harris aims to lead the Cavaliers back to the NCAA tournament. And, like many athletes, Harris has an affinity for inspirational quotes.

Wichita State looks to turn Final Four into a springboard (USA Today)
Like George Mason, Butler and VCU before them, Wichita State is hoping to use its appearance in the Final Four as a springboard to bigger and better things under Gregg Marshall. With Cleanthony Early leading the way, the Shockers are ranked 14th nationally and the preseason favorites to win the Missouri Valley Conference.

Fillyaw’s aggressiveness a surprise to Salukis (Carbondale Southern)
In Southern Illinois’ first three games of the season, sophomore guard Marcus Fillyaw attempted a total of nine shots from the field. In his fourth game as a Saluki, Fillyaw surprised his teammates to the tune of 17 points in a home loss to Saint Louis. And for SIU to improve its standing within the Missouri Valley, they’re going to need more aggressive offensive play from players such as Fillyaw.

Monmouth enters first season in the MAAC with one motto: “we’re no one’s day off” (Newark Star-Ledger)
King Rice’s Hawks fell at Seton Hall on Monday night, with Pirate Patrik Auda accounting for 27 points and ten rebounds. And the outcome isn’t a surprise, with little being expected of Rice’s team as they play their first season in the MAAC. Picked to finish last in the conference, Monmouth’s most basic goal is a simple one: to not be any opponent’s “day off.”

Ball State coach has high expectations for young leader (Fort Wayne News-Sentinel)
First-year Ball State head coach James Whitford will rely on a freshman to lead his team, handing the keys to the offense to rookie point guard Zavier Turner. And with that being the case there are a number of responsibilities on Turner’s plate, but the feeling is that the freshman’s capable of handling them.

Noah Vonleh quietly emerging onto the national scene (Inside the Hall)
A highly regarded freshman entering the season, Indiana forward Noah Vonleh’s flown under the radar somewhat due in large part to the Hoosiers not playing a marquee non-conference game to this point in the season. But Vonleh’s been highly productive for Indiana, posting double-doubles in each of Indiana’s first four games. And with two games in New York City later this week (including a possible matchup with UConn), Vonleh should receive some more attention nationally.

Offering equal pay to college athletes won’t work (CNN Money)
With the Ed O’Bannon lawsuit hovering over collegiate athletics, many have taken the time to ponder how the current model would change if the NCAA were to lose the case. Of course, for many this means discussing whether or not (and how) to pay college athletes, but the plan the plaintiffs have in mind may not be an effective one.

Top AAU basketball coach’s arrest shakes up New England Basketball (
The New England basketball community was hit hard by the arrest of Rhode Island Hawks coach Jay Elliott on child pornography charges. During his time with the Hawks Elliott has coached numerous players who have played at the Division I level, and the program is one of the region’s best grassroots programs.

Siena relying on Poole as a go-to guy (Troy Record)
After three down seasons the Siena basketball program went through a change in leadership in the spring, with Jimmy Patsos being hired to replace Mitch Buonaguro. And in Patsos’ first season at the helm junior Rob Poole is the team’s go-to scorer and he’s performed well in the role, as he ranks in the Top 10 in the MAAC in scoring.

Syracuse receives mixed news on sanctions appeals

Jim Boeheim
Associated Press
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Wednesday the NCAA made its ruling on two¬†appeals of sanctions made by Syracuse University, with the news being mixed for the men’s basketball program.

On the positive side the NCAA ruled that Syracuse will be docked two scholarships per season for the next four years, as opposed to the original ruling of three. As a result Jim Boeheim’s program only has to account for the loss of eight total scholarships, meaning that they’ll have 11 to fill in each of the next four seasons as opposed to ten.

One scholarship may not seem like a big deal, but in a sport where you only get 13 (when not dealing with sanctions) getting that grant-in-aid back really helps from a recruiting standpoint.

As for the negatives, they both concern Boeheim. Not only has there yet to be a ruling on Boeheim’s appeal of his nine-game suspension that goes into effect when ACC play begins in January (that appeal is being heard separately), but the appeal to reinstate the wins that were vacated as part of the sanctions was denied. As a result Boeheim officially has 868 wins instead of 969 (not counting today’s game against Charlotte).

And with Mike Hopkins set to take over as head coach in 2018, the denial means that college basketball will have to wait quite some time before anyone threatens to join Duke’s Mike Krzyzewski in the 1,000 wins club.

While not having the wins officially reinstated does hurt, getting a scholarship back for each of the next four seasons is a bigger deal when it comes to the long-term health of the Syracuse program. Also of great importance will be the ruling regarding Boeheim’s suspension, as a suspended coach is not allowed to have any contact with his players or coaching staff while serving the penalty.

And with the original ruling due to take up half of Syracuse’s league slate, not having Boeheim (or the chance to speak with him) is a big deal when it comes to this current team.

St. John’s forward Kassoum Yakwe cleared by NCAA

Chris Mullin
AP Photo/Rick Bowmer
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St. John’s forward Kassoum Yakwe has been cleared by the NCAA to play this season and will be eligible immediately, the school announced on Wednesday.

Yakwe is a 6-foot-8 forward that reclassified and enrolled at St. John’s this fall. He attended the same high school as Kansas forward Cheick Diallo, who was also cleared by the NCAA to play today.

St. John’s played in the Maui Invitational this week, and Yakwe did not take part. His first game with the Johnnies will be on Dec. 2nd against Fordham if the program plans to play his this season.

The question that must be asked, however, is whether or not he will suit up or simply redshirt. The Johnnies are in the midst of a serious rebuild and will be without their other elite recruit this season, Marcus Lovett. Lovett was ruled a partial qualifier. Would it make sense to burn a year of eligibility on what make amount to a wasted season, or will head coach Chris Mullin opt to save that year for down the road?