The Secondary Break: Tuesday’s Links

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Now that the college basketball season is finally here, it’s time to bring back the daily collection of links needed to catch you up on the happenings of the night before.

While you were asleep: 24-hour college basketball marathon links 

BYU puts up 112 points in their win at Stanford
Proponents of the changes to the way in which the game will be officiated must have loved this one, as the Cougars and Cardinal combined to score 215 in Palo Alto. Tyler Haws (31 points) and Matt Carlino (25) led the way for BYU, who with the victory picked up a non-conference victory that could prove valuable come March. Chasson Randle led Stanford with 33, but the attempt to run with BYU didn’t work out too well.

Wichita State takes care of business at home
Fred Van Vleet played very well for the Shockers, who beat Western Kentucky by the final score of 66-49. The sophomore finished with 17 points, five rebounds, four steals and three assists against the two-time defending Sun Belt tournament champions.

Saint Mary’s caps a 3-0 night for the WCC
West Coast Conference teams are now a combined 15-0 on the season thanks to the Gaels’ 85-63 beating of Akron early Tuesday morning. Brad Waldow scored 16 points to lead the way for Saint Mary’s, who pulled away after leading by seven at the intermission. Of note moving forward was the performance of James Walker III, who finished the game with 15 points (11 in the first half). If he can be a consistent double-figure scorer alongside Stephen Holt, Saint Mary’s could prove to be closer to Gonzaga and BYU than many believe them to be.

New Mexico State holds off Hawaii, 95-88 
This contest featured five technical fouls, one of which coming as a result of Hawaii calling a timeout when they had none remaining. In the end New Mexico State’s work inside of the arc and on the glass proved to be the difference, with five Aggies scoring 15 points or more.

And now for the morning reading material:

Boston College has a special teammate in 15-year old Robo Arcand (NESN)
Arcand’s been fighting leukemia, but he hasn’t done so alone. And just as he’s benefitted from their assistance, Steve Donohue’s program has received benefits as well.

UMass’ Cady Lalanne will be an important piece for UMass (Hoopville)
With LSU bringing its stable of solid big men to Amherst later this morning this is a good read on Lalanne, who’s looking to build on his outstanding performance against Boston College on Sunday.

More chatter about how displeased some coaches are with the new points of emphasis (Washington Post)
Once again, there will be growing pains when it comes to the move to “clean up” the game and limit contact both on and off the ball. But that doesn’t mean some coaches won’t pass up the opportunity to voice their displeasure.

Remember Grinnell’s Jack Taylor? His goal is to be remembered for more than scoring 138 points in a game (Associated Press)
When you score as many points in a single game as Taylor did last season, people tend to look at you as some kind of “carnival act.” Taylor’s aim in 2013-14 is to change that by being more productive on a consistent basis.

Zay Henderson’s broken hand leaves Murray State with eight available scholarship players (West Kentucky Star)
Steve Prohm’s squad will have to depth issues to deal with during the early portion of the season, with reserve forward Zay Henderson going down with a broken hand. The Racers will add Clemson transfer T.J. Sapp at the end of the semester, but this is a group that can’t afford any more roster issues.

Elite freshmen are all the rage, and a few will take center stage at the Champions Classic tonight (USA Today)
The freshmen are a big reason why there’s more excitement for both the college basketball season as a whole, and tonight’s Champions Classic in Chicago. Newcomers at Duke, Kansas and Kentucky will all be on display at the United Center (as well as some tough veterans at Michigan State).

Who should be blamed for Oregon’s Dominic Artis and Ben Carter selling team-issued sneakers? (Complex)
There’s no doubt that the two players, who were suspended for nine games apiece, violated an NCAA rule. But is there more blame to be passed around in the aftermath?

Video of the Morning: How did two Wichita State fans keep their energy levels up during the Shockers’ win over Western Kentucky?

It’s obviously too late for any advice on how to remain awake for the entire 24-hour college hoops marathon, but keep this in mind for next year (if you’re a fan of such beverages).

POSTERIZED: Texas guard Kerwin Roach throws down Dunk of the Year candidate on Duke (VIDEO)

Screengrab via ESPN
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Kerwin Roach is one of the best dunkers in college basketball, and he was at it again on Saturday afternoon in the PK80, as he went soaring in to throw down a dunk in the face of Duke forward Javin DeLaurier:

Luke Maye’s career-high 28 paces No. 9 North Carolina past Arkansas

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In hindsight, maybe we were a little too concerned about Luke Maye’s ability to anchor North Carolina’s front court.

In the toughest test that the Tar Heels have faced to date this season, Maye turned out the game of his life. He finished with career-highs of 28 points and 16 boards while tying a career-high with five assists and knocking down four threes as the No. 9 Tar Heels took care of Arkansas, 87-68, in the semifinals of the PK80.

The Tar Heels will advance to face the winner of this evening’s No. 4 Michigan State-UConn game.

But the story here is Maye, who became the first North Carolina player since Antawn Jamison to post 100 points and 50 boards in a season’s first five games. On the season, he’s averaging 20.8 points, 10.8 boards and 2.8 assists. He’s shooting better than 50 percent from three and nearly 60 percent from the floor. On a team that features a potential first-team all-american and the reigning Final Four Most Outstanding Player in Joel Berry II, it’s been Maye who has been the star of UNC’s season to date.

And there’s no reason to believe that this is a fluke, either.

Maye had 26 points and 10 boards in a win over a Northern Iowa team that just beat SMU and N.C. State. He had 20 points, nine boards and four assists against a good Bucknell team. He had 12 points, nine boards and five assists in a win at Stanford. And, of course, there was Friday afternoon’s performance.

What makes Maye’s development so important is the reliance of big men in Roy Williams’ system. He is one of the only high-major coaches that still builds his team around two big men. He values rebounding above all else. He runs his offense through post touches. The crux of his transition offense is the ability of his big men to beat their defenders down the floor.

Maye not only can do all of that, but his ability to make threes helps to space the floor.

After the year that he had last season, it’s not all that surprising that Maye was able to step in and have success this year.

But if you’re going to tell me that you thought Luke Maye would be doing this, I’m going to need to see the receipts.

No. 25 Alabama tops BYU in Barclays Center Classic

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NEW YORK (AP) — John Petty scored 16 points to spark No. 25 Alabama to a 71-59 win over BYU in the second game of the Barclays Center Classic on Friday.

Dazon Ingram added 15 for Alabama, which improved to 5-0, the best start for the Crimson Tide since 2012-13, when they began 6-0. Donta Hall had 12, and Collin Sexton finished with 10.

BYU fell to 3-2 with its second loss in its last three games. Yoeli Childs led the Cougars with 21 points.

In his third season, coach Avery Johnson is attempting to build Alabama into a program that can compete on a national level. And the matchup against BYU displayed why the Crimson Tide could be an intriguing team this season.

Alabama was able to build a 15-point lead in the second half following Riley Norris’ layup layup with 10:43 left. Part of that was because of the Crimson Tide’s ability to pressure BYU defensively. Alabama recorded six blocked shots and forced 11 turnovers.

But program building does mean growing pains. And the Crimson Tide’s youth also revealed itself in the second half. Following Petty’s 3 with 7:35 left, which gave Alabama a 61-47 lead, BYU outscored the Crimson Tide 8-2 in a span of 1:21 to cut the deficit to 63-55. Dalton Nixon made two free throws and Zac Seljaas made consecutive 3s for the Cougars in that stretch.

BYU got back into the game in part because of questionable shot selection in the second half from the Crimson Tide, who made 18 of 30 shots from the field before halftime.

Eight points was as close as BYU would get. Ingram knocked down two free throws, and Hall’s tip-in in the final two minutes gave the Crimson Tide the margin of victory.

BIG PICTURE

Alabama: Size matters. At least it does to the Crimson Tide. Alabama has 11 players 6-foot-5 or taller. That size and length allowed Alabama to create turnovers and contest shots, leading to fast breaks.

BYU: It may not be fair to say as Elijah Bryant goes, so does BYU. But Bryant, who entered the game averaging 21.5 points, was limited to three points in the first half and five for the game.

NOTES

The Crimson Tide entered the game having won their first four by an average of 18 points per game. Moreover, Alabama was holding opponents to .411 shooting from the field and .338 shooting from 3-point range, while blocking 6.8 shots and forcing 7.3 steals in those games. … The Cougars fell to 0-2 all-time against the Crimson Tide. In the only other meeting, BYU dropped a 77-74 decision on Dec. 30, 1957.

UP NEXT:

Alabama: Will play No. 14 Minnesota Saturday in the Barclays Center Classic.

BYU: Will play Massachusetts Saturday in Brooklyn.

Washington State knocks off No. 21 Saint Mary’s 84-79

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FULLERTON, Calif. (AP) — In less than 24 hours, Washington State went from playing another game of catch-up to dictating down the stretch against a ranked team.

Malachi Flynn scored 26 points and the Cougars held off No. 21 Saint Mary’s 84-79 to reach the title game of the Wooden Legacy on Friday.

In the opening round, Flynn hit a go-ahead 3-pointer with 5 seconds remaining to seal a 75-71 win against Saint Joseph’s after the Cougars rallied from 20 points down.

This time, the Cougars were the ones putting the Gaels (5-1) in a 16-point hole in the second half, and they stayed cool when Saint Mary’s got within three on a 3-pointer by Jordan Ford with 47 seconds left.

Robert Franks and Jeff Pollard made layups to preserve the win for the Cougars (5-0), who shot 62 percent in the second half.

“It was a 10:30 a.m. game, not too many people in the crowd, and we had to come out first and hit them with a lot of energy,” Flynn said.

Cougars coach Ernie Kent added, “On an off-day, college students usually sleep until 2.”

Washington State led 42-40 at halftime, just its second lead at the break this season. They outscored Saint Mary’s 42-39 in the second half just as they’ve done in every game so far.

“We continue to grow up a little bit with each challenge,” Kent said. “We’re already better than when we got on the plane to come here. The bigger the challenge, the bigger the stage, the more they rise up.”

Saint Mary’s opened the second half on a 10-4 spurt before Flynn’s basket tied it at 50-all. He followed with a 3-pointer that gave the Cougars the lead for good. He came up one point short of tying his career high.

The Gaels got to 65-61 on a basket by Jock Landale before the Cougars went on a 13-1 run. Kwinton Hinson had five points and Flynn added eight to extend Washington State’s lead to 78-62.

Saint Mary’s rallied on back-to-back 3-pointers by Calvin Hermanson that cut its deficit to 10. Evan Fitzner’s layup got the Gaels within six, leaving them to foul in the final minute.

“It’s probably one of our worst games of the year defensively,” Hermanson said. “We just got to be tougher and not let guys beat us.”

Emmett Naar scored 17 points for Saint Mary’s, which will play in the third-place game on Sunday. Fellow Aussie Landale added 14 points and nine rebounds while playing with three fouls. Ford finished with a career-high 15 points and Hermanson had 14.

“It’s simple, we didn’t guard anywhere close to well enough to beat a team like Washington State,” Gaels coach Randy Bennett said. “That’s been our Achilles’ heel thus far.”

STREAK BUSTED

Saint Mary shot 52 percent but its 64-game winning streak when shooting at least 50 percent from the floor ended. On the defensive side, the Gaels allowed Washington State to shoot 59 percent from the floor, just the seventh time since the start of the 2015-16 season that an opponent has topped 50 percent against them.

REPPIN’ THE PAC-12

For the fifth time, a Pac-12 team will play for the title. The league is 4-0 in the event. Washington State will try to join previous conference winners Southern California, California, Washington and UCLA.

BIG PICTURE

Saint Mary’s never led by more than six and had three players in foul trouble as the Gaels’ five-game winning streak ended.

Washington State has been living on the edge, digging itself big holes in the first half of games only to rally in the second half. But the Cougars grew up in less than 24 hours. They led Saint Mary’s by 2 at halftime and played with poise down the stretch.

UP NEXT

Saint Mary’s: Advances to the third-place game Sunday.

Washington State: Moves on to the championship game Sunday.

Villanova’s Battle 4 Atlantis title could end up hurting their NCAA tournament profile

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When Villanova made the decision to play in the 2017 Battle 4 Atlantis, they expected that the event would give them a shot at landing at least two quality wins, if not three.

Instead, the Wildcats will be leaving paradise with a title that came with victories over Western Kentucky, Tennessee and Northern Iowa, after Friday’s 64-50 triumph.

It’s hard to say that winning three games in three days in a resort’s ballroom on a tropical island is a bad thing, but this certainly was not a best-case scenario for Jay Wright’s club. Instead of playing – and, in theory, beating – No. 19 Purdue in the semifinals and No. 3 Arizona in the title games, upsets took those matchups out of play.

Great!

That means that Villanova brings themselves home a trophy and a couple more strands of net.

But that’s not exactly the reason that teams play in these events. The experience of playing a neutral site game after a crazy amount of travel on back-to-back nights certainly does good for the team as a whole, but that’s not quite as important as strengthening non-conference schedules and adding the kind of quality wins that could bump them up a seed line or two.

Think about it like this: The only two quality non-conference opponents that Villanova has left on their schedule are No. 17 Gonzaga, UConn and Temple. Maybe Tennessee will do them a favor and get good enough to be looked at as a quality win, and there’s always a chance that Northern Iowa will end up being one of the nation’s best mid-major programs, but this is still a major blow to Villanova’s non-conference profile.

So when Bracketology season starts and Villanova finds themselves getting mentioned as a No. 2 or No. 3 seed because they don’t have the kind of quality wins that other contenders for the top seed line do, remember this week.

Villanova may be good enough that it does not matter.

But it would be foolish to pretend like those upsets don’t have some kind of effect.