2013-2014 College Basketball Dream Team

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All month long, CBT will be rolling out our 2013-2014 season preview. Check back throughout the day, as we’ll be posting three or four preview items every day.

To browse through the preview posts we’ve already published, click here. To see the rest of our preview lists, click here. For a schedule of our previews for the month, click here.

Every year around this time, we put together a Dream Team of college guys. The parameters this year? The NBA has announced that they’re added a 31st team for just this season and named us as the coaching staff. The only players available to us are guys on currently on college rosters, meaning that we’ve got 13 spots to fill on a team that will be playing 82 games against NBA teams over the next six months.

Here are the guys that made the cut:

G: Marcus Smart (Oklahoma State): Smart was the easy pick at the point guard spot. He’s a winner and a leader and the kind of player that will make everyone around him better, which is important considering that this team of college guys will be playing an NBA slate. He’s also got the ability on the defensive end of the floor to stay in front of NBA point guards. His perimeter shooting is a concern, but we’re going to have to hope he put in the work this summer.

G: Gary Harris (Michigan State): Harris had a shoulder that was more banged up than he let on all of last season, yet he still managed to average 12.9 points and shoot 41.1% from three. Now that he’s healthy, we’ll get a chance to see just how good of a basketball player he is. Plus, the kid was also a star on the gridiron in high school. He’s tough, just like Smart. Our back court won’t back down from anyone.

source: APF: Andrew Wiggins (Kansas): At this point in his development, Wiggins makes the cut here more for his ability on the defensive end of the floor and for his athleticism than the fact that we need a go-to scorer that can get 20 a night in the league. If he does score like that, however, this team might have a chance to win more than 15 games. Physicality will be an issue, but he’s as ready as anyone to hold his own at the next level.

F: Julius Randle (Kentucky): Like Wiggins, Randle’s physical tools leave him ready for the next level, although the 19 year old’s skill set will lag a little bit behind. That said, his ability to bully people around the basket should allow him to have an impact immediately, and as the season goes on, the hope would be that he’ll develop enough of a face-up game to be a legitimate secondary scoring option.

C: Mitch McGary (Michigan): The center spot is where we ran into a bit of an issue here, as no one in college is really an ideal fit to help in the pivot at the next level right away. We went with McGary because you know what you’re going to get out of him: physicality and toughness in the lane, max effort for 48 minutes, and a presence on the glass.

Bench:

  • Jahii Carson (Arizona State): Carson is our change-of-pace point guard, the guy that we’ll bring in when things get stagnant or when we need an injection of energy into the lineup. He’ll run the floor, but can he defend?
  • Willie Cauley-Stein (Kentucky): We were enamored with Cauley-Stein’s ability to run, his athleticism and the shot-blocking presence that he’ll provide. He’s coming off the bench because McGary’s more physical.
  • Spencer Dinwiddie (Colorado): Dinwiddie’s versatility is what earned him a spot here. At 6-foot-6, he can defend multiple positions, but he’s also capable of playing the point or off the ball.
  • Aaron Gordon (Arizona): Gordon’s athleticism is off the charts, and it’s silly to leave a guy at home in a league where your athleticism needs to be off the charts. We’ll use him in four-out, one-in sets, but he’ll be used more as a four than a wing.
  • Doug McDermott (Creighton): You just don’t leave guys that can shoot it the way that McDermott can at home. The concern, obviously, is on the defensive end of the floor, where he could have trouble against wings or big men.
  • Jabari Parker (Duke): Parker’s versatility was just too much to pass up. He’s coming off the bench, but he’ll be used in a lot of lineups on a wing, bumping Wiggins to off-guard.
  • Adreian Payne (Michigan State): We needed a third-string center, and Payne was the pick for two reasons: his size and athleticism and the fact that he can hit a three.
  • James Young (Kentucky): The biggest weakness on this team is perimeter shooting, which is why Young made the cut. We toyed with Joe Harris and Tyler Haws for this spot, but took Young because we believed he was better equipped for the defensive end of the floor.

Ohio State lands grad transfer Keyshawn Woods

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With three of the team’s top five scorers from this season, led by Big Ten Player of the Year Keita Bates-Diop, moving on Ohio State entered the offseason in need of players who could potentially have an immediate impact in 2018-19.

Tuesday evening the Buckeyes picked up a commitment from a grad transfer, as former Wake Forest guard Keyshawn Woods announced that he will play his final season at Ohio State.

Woods appeared in 28 games for the Demon Deacons in 2017-18, averaging 11.9 points, 2.5 rebounds and 1.9 assists in 25.7 minutes per game. The 6-foot-3 guard was used primarily as a reserve this past season, making just five starts for Wake Forest. Woods began his collegiate career at Charlotte, playing the 2014-15 season there before transferring to Wake Forest.

During the 2016-17 season, the first in which he was eligible to play at Wake Forest, Woods started 22 of the 33 games he played in and averaged 12.5 points, 4.2 rebounds and 3.5 assists per game. Woods shot 49.5 percent from the field and 43.8 percent from three during that campaign, and the hope in Columbus is that he can get back to that level in his lone season as a Buckeye.

Ohio State’s best returnee on the perimeter next season will be rising junior C.J. Jackson, who averaged 12.6 points, 3.9 rebounds and 3.9 assists per game as a sophomore. Ohio State also adds a talented freshman class that includes guards Duane Washington Jr. and Luther Muhammad. Florida State transfer C.J. Walker will have two seasons of eligibility remaining after sitting out the upcoming campaign per NCAA transfer rules.

Memphis to recruit in style with new souped-up van

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Traveling during live recruiting periods isn’t the most enjoyable process for college basketball coaches, with many having to work their way through airports and car rental lines in order to keep tabs on players they’re recruiting. For the programs at the top of the sport a private plane may be available, which certainly helps.

In the case of Penny Hardaway’s Memphis program, the coaching staff will be hitting the road in style as he showed off a new, souped-up van via his Twitter account Tuesday afternoon.

Notice the “One Cent” logo in the headrests, making it clear whose van it is and what Hardaway’s accomplished in the game of basketball as a player. For those too young to be intimately familiar with his playing career, Hardaway’s work with the Bluff City Legends (named Team Penny when he was in charge) on the Nike EYBL circuit and at Memphis East HS will likely register.

Since Hardaway’s hiring he and his staff, which includes assistants Tony Madlock and two-time NBA champion Mike Miller, have made Memphis a player on the recruiting trail. Will the van reel in top prospects? Maybe, maybe not. But there’s no denying the fact that Hardaway and his staff have already managed to connect in a way that the prior coaching staff was unable to.

Now we wait for the anonymous complaint from another athletic department to the NCAA about Hardaway and Memphis having this van, because that’s generally the way in which these things work.

NABC sends out talking points ahead of Rice Commission announcement

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Wednesday morning the NCAA will announced the recommendations of the Rice Commission, which is headed by former Secretary of State Condoleeza Rice. The commission was formed in the aftermath of the FBI’s September arrest of ten individuals in connection with an investigation into corruption and bribes in college basketball recruiting back, with the stated goal being to introduce reforms that would “clean up” the sport.

NBC Sports obtained an email the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) sent out to its members in preparation for Wednesday’s announcement. In the email, the NABC provided “talking points” while also encouraging coaches to support the Rice Commission’s findings — whether they agree with them or not.

“In short, it is imperative that the Commission’s recommendations be met with unequivocal support from each of us. The NABC Board of Directors affirmed the necessity of this unified response on a conference call earlier today,” the statement sent out by the NABC read.

The key talking points are:

  • Change was necessary, and we knew change was coming. As coaches on the front lines, we are uniquely positioned to offer valuable insight as the Commission’s recommendations progress through the legislative process;
  • As coaches, we are committed to working with the NCAA in evaluating the recommendations and will provide appropriate input as legislation is drafted;
  • We are appreciative of the Commission’s efforts to address necessary change, and for welcoming the input of the NABC.

The Rice Commission’s recommendations are highly anticipated in college basketball circles, and it remains to be seen just how quickly the NCAA would go about implementing them. One topic that’s bound to be discussed is the “one and done” player, but it once again must be noted that this is something controlled by the NBA and its Players Association (via the collective bargaining agreement). There’s also the connection with shoe companies, which became an even bigger point of conversation in the aftermath of the FBI arrest.

Hearing what coaches have to say about the Rice Commission’s findings would have been interesting. But with the NABC looking to present a unified front, there may not be much to take from what the coaches say in the aftermath of Wednesday’s announcement.

Kansas made no written report of its athletics review

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LAWRENCE, Kan. (AP) — The University of Kansas did not produce any written reports of an independent examination of its athletics department amid a federal investigation of corruption in college basketball because an external report wasn’t necessary, Chancellor Douglas Girod said.

The university review came before Kansas was named earlier this month as one of the schools where a former Adidas representative allegedly arranged payments to parents of athletes to ensure the athletes committed to the schools.

Girold said Monday he was given verbal briefings after last fall’s review but he didn’t receive any written reports. The university’s review was prompted by an Oct. 11 memo from the NCAA requiring Division I basketball programs to examine their men’s basketball programs “for possible NCAA rules violations, including violations related to offers, inducements, agents, extra benefits, and other similar issues.”

On April 13, Girod said in a statement that he had “complete confidence” that the athletics department had followed all rules.

“We didn’t feel the need to release an external report,” Girod said. “What we needed to be sure of is that we are comfortable and confident in the way our team operates and in meeting any and every requirement necessary.”

When The Lawrence Journal-World filed an open records request seeking all written reports related to the review Kansas officials said no such records exist. The newspaper said without a written report it was difficult to determine what the university examined and what methods were used.

Kansas hired an outside law firm but said the firm only provided assistance on technical matters.

Girod said Monday the examination reviewed several records to determine whether there is anything the university should be concerned about and found nothing.

The latest federal indictment in the wider investigation alleges that a former Adidas executive paid a mother and a guardian of two basketball players at least $130,000 to ensure they would play for the Jayhawks. No Kansas officials were implicated.

“We have gone back to look at anything we have access to, and we can’t find any evidence of that,” Girod said. “But we don’t have access to everything. That is all we really can do — make sure that on our side of the house we are doing everything appropriately and properly.”

Milwaukee to lose top three scorers to transfer

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Milwaukee announced this week that the three leading scorers off of last season’s fifth-place Horizon League team have been given their release to transfer out of the program.

Jeremiah Bell (14.1 ppg) and Brock Stull (13.4 ppg), both junior guards, as well as sophomore forward Bryce Nze (10.3 ppg) will all pursue other opportunities, which is trouble for a program with a coach that just finished his first season and a roster that finished below .500 on the season.

“Our staff wishes this group of players nothing but the best,” coach Pat Baldwin said in the statement. “We never like to see players leave, but each student-athlete has a unique set of circumstances and feels what is best for them is somewhere else. As they all wish to pursue options at the high-major level, we do want to thank them for their contributions to the Milwaukee basketball program.”